Bristol Business School shortlisted for Times Higher ‘Business School of the Year’ award

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The Bristol Business School has been shortlisted for ‘Business School of the Year’ at the Times Higher Education awards.

This is the 2nd year in a row the Business School has been shortlisted for the prestigious award.

The shortlisted submission was build around impactful research, engagement with business and innovation in entrepreneurship.

The submission showcases the success of two students from the Team Entrepreneurship programme who secured national awards: Jamie Rawsthorne, named IoD Student Director of the Year and Oliver Haddon, TARGETjobs Future Leader in Business Undergraduate of the Year, as well as highlighting the opening of the purpose built £55 million building. Reflecting the strong links to industry and the growing reputation of the business school as a hub for knowledge exchange, last year saw the milestone 100th speaker in the Bristol Distinguished Address Series.

The Business School is not alone in receiving recognition for a success over the last year, the Centre for Fine Print Research has also made the shortlist for Most Innovative Contribution to Business within the University Collaboration Category for their Knowledge Transfer Partnership with Burleigh Pottery.

Thanks to AHRC-funded research, the Centre for Fine Print Research was able to use innovative digital technologies to rescue the traditional engraving techniques which are used to create Burleighware’s distinctive designs. These techniques, developed in the late 18th century, have been vanishing and Burleigh is the only company in the world to keep them alive.

Vice-Chancellor Steve West, said, “I’m sure the whole University community will join me in wishing the best of luck to everyone involved in both submissions. We’re extremely proud of the successes made by the Bristol Business School in the first year in their new building, and delighted that our links with industry and the opportunities they open for students are being recognised by the shortlisting of the Burleigh project.”

The winners will be announced on Thursday 29 November at a gala event at Grosvenor House Hotel, London.

Introducing the Trailblazer programme: Free CPD for Bristol Business School alumni

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Bristol Business School are offering our alumni a pioneering and exclusive complimentary professional development programme, relevant across disciplines, regardless of when you graduated.

Launching in September 2018, our Trailblazer Programme will blend face-to-face sessions with webinars and social events. You will be motivated to maximise personal impact, boost effectiveness and develop leadership skills.

Facilitated by experienced academics, seasoned practitioners, and inspirational speakers, this programme echoes the mantra of learning by doing what is integral to our Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School.

Who is it for?

Offered exclusively to UWE Bristol alumni on a complimentary basis, this is a chance to continue the learning that you began when you were a student. The programme enables you to take advantage of your lifelong connection to our expertise and community.

Entry requirements

There are no formal entry requirements for this programme, however places will be offered exclusively to UWE Bristol alumni from our undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.

Content

The programme incorporates four face-to-face sessions alongside online learning through webinars and two social events per a cohort.

Session 1 – Leading Self for Personal Effectiveness: Learn how to adapt your behaviour and actions when dealing with different individuals, tasks and situations. Acquire the skills to deliver exceptional performance, authentically.

Session 2 – Leading Others for Impact: Practical tips on creating high performing teams focusing on; healthy team dynamics, influencing and communicating.

Session 3 – Coaching and Mentoring: Transform your personal management style in this practical session by developing your coaching and mentoring skills to enhance performance and encourage self-exploration.

Session 4 – Design Thinking: Experience the creative process of finding new and transformative solutions to problems whilst also generating innovative ideas and opportunities.

Webinars: Webinar topics will be decided at the start of the programme to ensure these are relevant to the current business environment.They will be available live or pre-recorded.

Graduation: Graduation event for the year’s cohorts.

Professional accreditation

We are seeking to get this programme approved by the CPD Certification Service, meaning you will receive a certificate to demonstrate your CPD hours through completion of this programme*.

The growing network of participants will benefit from lasting relationships with likeminded professionals.

*subject to approval being granted.

Places for the course are limited to 40 participants per cohort. For more information and to apply for your free place, please see here.

 

Tenth Developing Leadership Capacity Conference (DLCC)

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In mid July, the Bristol Business School hosted the tenth Developing Leadership Capacity Conference (DLCC). The two day conference was attended by around 70 participants who all came to present ideas and share knowledge.

The DLCC was originally developed with the aim of having a combination of those interested in researching the area of leadership learning and development and those interested in new ideas for practice. This year the conference had a healthy mix of both.

Keynotes were given by Professor Carole Elliot (Roehampton University) on Women’s Leadership Development, Dr Kevin Flinn (Hertfordshire University) presenting on a complexity approach to leadership learning and Professor Paul Hibbert (St Andrews University) who presented on an aesthetic approach to understanding leadership experiences.

Alongside the keynotes, delegates could attend streamed sessions across the categories of case studies, theory and workshops.

This year the conference was particularly interested in innovative and creative approaches to learning and developing leadership. There was stimulating conversation across all the streamed session over the two days around this theme.

The 70 plus delegates came from as far afield as Canada, Ghana, Saudi Arabia and Australia.

The keynotes are pictured below with the conference hosts and founders Dr Doris Schedlitzki and Dr Gareth Edwards and the Director of the Bristol Leadership and Change Centre, Professor Richard Bolden.

Starting the conversation: what to say to your potential online mentor

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It can seem daunting to be the person that makes the first move – even when we’re talking about online mentoring.

Relax, you’ve already got at least one thing in common with the people who’ve volunteered to be mentors on Alumni Connect – UWE Bristol. But where do you go from there?

First impressions count online, and you want your potential mentor to want to help you. Here’s some tips on what to include in your opening gambit.

  1. Introduce yourself

This is about writing a short summary that will help your mentor understand what you need. Tell them what you study/have studied and the main reason you’re looking for a mentor right now. You don’t have to send your CV straight away (or at all), and you might feel more comfortable doing this after someone has replied to your first question. Short and sweet will do just fine here.

  1. Explain why you’ve picked them

Even mentors like to feel special! There’s a reason you’ve considered this mentor, so don’t be shy to let them know.

  1. Ask a question that Google can’t answer

You don’t need to go in with a question straight away, but if you do make sure you don’t ask something could find on the first page of a search engine. Alumni Connect gives you the chance to make unique connections and learn from others’ experiences. So ask your potential mentor something only they can answer.

Example:

I’ve just graduated in Marketing Communications and I’m looking for someone to help me get my first job in Social Media Marketing.

I notice that you worked in Marketing for the Olympic Park, and I’d be really interested to know more about what that involved.

What do you love most about your job?

Or

I’m in my final year studying Graphic Design. It would be brilliant if you could take a look at my website and let me know if there are any areas I could work on to help me get work experience with your company.

I think your approach is really unique and I love the project you did for Santander.

What do you think was the most important factor in getting your job?

Once the conversation has started, it’s up to you and your mentor when it stops!

With the right introduction you can grab their attention and they’ll be able to see how they can help you. Explaining who you are, what help you need and why you think they might be the right mentor to assist you creates an instant confidence.

You might have just established a valuable connection and a helpful stepping stone in your career.

Leanne Newton, Careers Consultant

 

 

What’s happening in the world of research?

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Originally posted on Business Leader.

Professor Glenn Parry of Bristol Business School talks about his research on business model Innovation through the Internet of Things, and the privacy concerns it raises: 

The research Dr Alex Kharlamov and I have been doing at UWE in partnership with colleagues at other institutions has been focused on personal data.

In the first major piece we developed the Hub of All Things. This is a place where you can store all your personal data. What we developed is a personal data micro-server; a platform that allows you to store, analyse and send out data, giving individuals more control over their digital labour. My research relates to how personal data from the home might help inform business models. IoT (Internet of Things) provides an opportunity to gather direct data from the home on how we use products and services.

We gave a group of people different IoT devices and they allowed us access to their data. We analysed what resources there  are in the home and created four categories of associated ways they can be measured, which we named use visibility measures; depletion measures, consumption measures, experience measures, and interaction measures. So, if we consider a tin of beans, it is a depletion resource with a very long shelf life. The home owner may have several tins in their cupboard.

The supplier currently has no visibility of the number of tins in storage or the rate and time of consumption. With the power of the IoT and user permission, it would be possible to track this and replenish in a smart way such that when a tin is consumed another is automatically delivered. This changes the business model for the retailer and the nature of the resource moves from depletion to consumption. It also offers possibilities for more sustainable supply.

IoT data allows us to see how a resource is used. For example, does the homeowner microwave or stove heat the beans, how are they used in combination with other foods, what times of day are they consumed and by whom? Access to such detailed data reveals opportunities to create new offers and for the provider to engage in dialogue with the homeowner to improve their experience.

However, data sharing at this level raises concerns about privacy and vulnerability. Our current research is addressing this important issue.

We started researching in the domain of medical data, as we perceive this as the most sensitive data and the principles of privacy and confidentiality are paramount. With medical data, we have found that people do evaluate the risk and benefit of sharing.

However, we find that the majority of patient’s share their medical data. Some of the possible interpretations of this finding is that individuals neglect the potential risk or over-estimate the potential benefit. Another possible interpretation is that patients do not fully understand the implications of sharing and quite how many people can access it. There is more work to be done here.

In a different study, we focused on assessing perceived individual vulnerability towards sharing personal data. We find that people overestimate the likelihood of rare types of data loss and underestimate of the most common  and most likely types of data loss. When it comes to data relating to their finances (credit card or bank account details) or account access (passwords to different websites, or social media) people are rightly careful.

This was met with challenges as we found that individuals tend to be generally risk-taking, and do not feel vulnerable with regards to  their identity data, email address, affiliation, etc. Identity data can be used to masquerade as someone else and causes one of the most common and eminent threats today. .

Our latest work seeks to measure individual risk-taking and risk perception for data, and we created a psychometric scale Cyber-Domain-Specific Risk-Taking Scale (CyberDOSPERT). Institutions tend to judge and model data loss from a financial point of view. Our findings show this differs from consumers who do not assess their information privacy from a financial point of view, but rather from an ethical standpoint.

The work suggests modelling risk associated with consumer data loss purely on financial terms is wrong and models needs to factor in the ethical judgements made by the consumer in the case of data breach.

International Women’s Day at UWE Bristol

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Come help us celebrate the entrepreneurial, political, social and cultural achievements of women, and their acts of courage and determination in the pursuit of gender parity in their workplaces, communities and countries.

To mark the day, we have planned a series of events and workshops at UWE which are all free to attend and open to all.

Alongside the events there will be stalls set up through the Atrium showcasing the amazing work that women in our region produce.

There will be a charity raffle with prizes including a Spa day from The Gainsborough Bath Spa, two tickets to the Affordable Art Fair in London, a coaching session from Sequoia Bridge as well as many more. All proceeds from the raffle will go to Bristol charity one25 who reach out to women trapped in, or vulnerable to, street sex work, supporting them to break free and build new lives away from violence, poverty and addiction. Further information can be found here!

There will be a free lunch provided by Bini Fine Foods for all attendees.

In order to register for this event, please email: fbl.execsupport@uwe.ac.uk 

Agenda

Arrival & Refreshments

10.00 – 10.15

Welcome

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10.15 – 10.45

Female entrepreneurs: Inspirational case studies 6X269
Refreshments

11.00 – 12.00

Panel discussion: ‘Barriers to and opportunities for enabling more successful women in business’

·         Professor Jane Roscoe (Chair) – Pro Vice Chancellor and Executive Dean, ACE

·         Kalpna Woolf – Award winning ex BBC Head. Author -Spice Yourself Slim

·         Sado Jirde – Director of Black South West Network (BSWN)

·         Vashti Seth – Success Redefined Coach

·         Professor Sue Durbin – Professor in Human Resource Management

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Lunch

International Women’s Day Choir

Stalls ran by female entrepreneurs

Raffle announcement

Drop in sessions

Available between 12.00-14.00

Screening of Barefoot in Business

This is a film created by BAFTA award winning film maker Carol Cooke about female entrepreneurs in Uganda.

7X201

13.15- 14:15

CV Surgery

Careers Space X Block

13.15-14.15

Speed Mentoring

Speed mentoring (with a focus on enterprise)

TE Space

Workshops

14.20-15.00

Athena SWAN Workshop

The Role of Athena SWAN in engaging gender equality in UK university settings: Accreditation or lever of change?’

2X116

14.20-15.15 Creating and Telling your Leadership Story

3X105

15.20-15.50 Difficult Conversations

‘Based on one of UWEs Learning and Development Centre courses, this will workshop will leave you with some tips on how to better handle difficult conversations.’

 

2X116

 

 

Wandering about Bristol

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Throughout 2015 – 2017, Senior Lecturer Pam Seanor has been working on the Wandering about Bristol project.

Wandering about Bristol is a Small Research Grant for the project ‘Thinking urban spaces differently: Articulating and contesting “green” imageries of Bristol as an enterprising city’ and is supported by the British Academy and Leverhulme Trust.

The project involved three collective walks and culminated in a workshop at the Arnolfini.

The workshop was attended by those who had participated in the 3 wanders including initiative, local government, consultants, architects, landscape architects and artists to name a few.

The workshop was opened by David Relph, Director of Bristol Health Partners who set the scene for the importance of people feeling they have power to act and how Health is about a connection with place.

A short film of the wanders was shown during the workshop.

The findings from the workshop will be shared in the few months.

Bristol Business School 2017 round up

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As 2017 comes to a close we want to share with you some of our highlights from the past year:

Back in January we launched our new Research Centres and groups.

In February, we helped alumnus Jeremiah Daliel’s launch his first book, inspired by his real life experiences 

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Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School students at the UWE Talent awards

At the UWE Talent awards in March, students from the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School won 5 categories and were runners up in 5 categories.

In April, we opened the doors to our £55 million new building which is now home to the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School.

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Bristol Business School

We invited our alumni to be some of the first to visit the building at a networking event in May.

In June, we announced our 5 year partnership with Glastonbury Festival.

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Steve West and Fiona Jordan at Glastonbury Festival

July saw us celebrate our student success at our Graduation ceremonies. The ceremonies in July included the first cohort of students from our partnership University, Villa College in the Maldives.

Villa College students graduation
Our Villa College students at Graduation 

Bristol Business School academic Svetlana Cicmil was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award for Research in August.

Research Achievement Award
Svetlana Cicmil

In September, the Times Higher Education awards shortlisted the Bristol Business School as Business School of the Year.

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Bristol Business School nominated for Business School of the Year

October saw our first cohort from the Hire Association Europe and Event Hire Association finish their ILM Level 5 in Leadership and Management. Read about how the Bristol Business School helped them develop a qualification for the industry in this case study.

In November, we announced our partnership with the Aldridge Foundation with a guest blog from Sir Rod Aldridge.

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Sir Rod Aldridge

Finally, in December one of our students was named CIPD West of England Branch Student of the Year.

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CIPD Student of the Year 

To see more of our highlights from 2017 visit our blog. Roll on 2018!

“The chancellor is out of ideas. Today’s budget is one to forget” Associate Professor Dr Jo Michell comments on the budget

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Associate Professor in Economics Dr Jo Michell provides comment on today’s budget: 

It is unlikely that UK Chancellor Phillip Hammond was looking forward to his budget speech. He would have seen the latest economic forecasts from the independent Office for Budget Responsibility. There is no way to spin them as good news.

The newspaper front pages will not make for comfortable reading.

The OBR is tasked with producing detailed forecasts of the UK economy. These forecasts form the basis for evaluation of the Government’s performance against the rules it sets itself on public debt.

In reality, the rules change so often they have little meaning. Today was no exception. By reclassifying housing associations as “private” institutions and fiddling the accounting rules for the upcoming privatisation of RBS, the chancellor conjured up extra £5bn a year of spending – a trivially small amount.

The OBR forecasts of the outlook for the UK economy are of more interest: they are the nearest thing we have to official projections of our future prospects for income, employment and prosperity.

Since its inception in 2010, the OBR has been wrong about one of the most important economic indicators: labour productivity. This is a measure of the goods and services produced on average by each worker. Without productivity growth, living standards can’t rise.

The OBR has consistently over-estimated productivity, as the chart below shows. Twice a year for the last seven years, the OBR has predicted a return to pre-crisis trend growth of two per cent per annum. It was wrong every time: productivity growth has averaged near enough zero over the period.

chart1

In its latest forecasts, the OBR admitted defeat and downgraded productivity forecasts to 1.5%, in line with recent projections by the Bank of England. While these look optimistic given the recent performance, the implications for growth, incomes and public services are dramatic. Government revenues are predicted to be £20bn per year lower than previously forecast. By 2022, wages will still be more than £500 per year lower than in 2007. And this is without taking the possible effects of a ‘hard Brexit’ into account.

Against such a dismal backdrop, the chancellor’s announcement of new productivity-boosting measures, such as an R&D tax credit, inevitably rang hollow.

To try and sugar the pill, the chancellor announced a few short-term giveaways. The most headline-grabbing was the abolition of stamp duty for first-time house-buyers. This might sound like a welcome boost for young people looking to get a foot on the housing ladder. But the OBR were quick to debunk this: they predict that the resulting increase in house prices will exceed  savings on stamp duty: “prices paid by first-time buyers would actually be higher with the relief than without it. Thus the main gainers from the policy are people who already own property, not the first time buyers themselves.” (p. 128).

Instead of given a leg-up to young people struggling to own a home, the chancellor has poured petrol on the fire and given another hand-out to the already-wealthy.

This will only increase the severity of the debt problem that the chancellor didn’t mention in today’s speech: the debt of UK households. Research at UWE Bristol has found that, while austerity has so far failed to reduce public debt, it has been accompanied by ever-faster growth of household debt. As the chart below shows, for every £2bn the chancellor has cut from the deficit, the rate at which households take on new debt has increased by £1bn.

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Nothing in today’s budget will reverse this trend. With incomes set to stagnate for years, and households already struggling, more will be forced to take on debt to make ends meet.

The chancellor had the opportunity to recognise the scale of the challenges faced by the country – flat productivity, unaffordable housing, stagnant incomes and government services pushed to the limit – and to announce a real change in direction. He should have announced a significant programme of public investment – in infrastructure, in R&D and in housing.

Instead, he did nothing of substance: a couple of new tax cuts and another nudge for house prices.

The chancellor is out of ideas. Today’s budget is one to forget.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five things businesses can do to become digitally savvy

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Author: Tim Hughes, Professor of Applied Marketing 

In recent years, digital marketing has fundamentally changed the nature of communication with customers. This is true of both Business-to-Consumer and Business-to-Business markets. Digital marketing captured 48% of U.K advertising revenue in 2016.

  • Update your website – For commercial and non-commercial organisations your website is your shop window to the world. It needs to reflect your brand values and be easy to use. Websites built on older platforms may be expensive to update. Using a specialist agency may be the best way to create a new website, although building your own is relatively simple.
  • Ensure your customers can find you – Get familiar with Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), Pay Per Click (PPC), advertising and email marketing, then use these to direct traffic to your website.
  • Engage your customers and potential customers – Social Media provides a great opportunity to talk to people with particular interests and profiles. Success in this is all about developing stimulating content over a sustained period.
  • Listen to your customers- Social Media, Blogs and Customer Review sites allow you to hear what customers are saying without having to commission expensive research.
  • Use data effectively – Understanding Data Analytics is the key to making the most of the extensive data that is created digitally. Use analytics to see what’s working and what isn’t.

Digital marketing can be daunting for small and medium companies and organisations. Using an agency may be a solution for some, but this can be expensive and does not necessarily provide an integrated solution. Another way is to equip your own staff with the skills to manage your digital marketing. Bristol Business School offers a Digital Marketing Institute qualification to support this (link). The next course runs from February 2018. See here for more information.