What’s happening in the world of research?

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Originally posted on Business Leader.

Professor Glenn Parry of Bristol Business School talks about his research on business model Innovation through the Internet of Things, and the privacy concerns it raises: 

The research Dr Alex Kharlamov and I have been doing at UWE in partnership with colleagues at other institutions has been focused on personal data.

In the first major piece we developed the Hub of All Things. This is a place where you can store all your personal data. What we developed is a personal data micro-server; a platform that allows you to store, analyse and send out data, giving individuals more control over their digital labour. My research relates to how personal data from the home might help inform business models. IoT (Internet of Things) provides an opportunity to gather direct data from the home on how we use products and services.

We gave a group of people different IoT devices and they allowed us access to their data. We analysed what resources there  are in the home and created four categories of associated ways they can be measured, which we named use visibility measures; depletion measures, consumption measures, experience measures, and interaction measures. So, if we consider a tin of beans, it is a depletion resource with a very long shelf life. The home owner may have several tins in their cupboard.

The supplier currently has no visibility of the number of tins in storage or the rate and time of consumption. With the power of the IoT and user permission, it would be possible to track this and replenish in a smart way such that when a tin is consumed another is automatically delivered. This changes the business model for the retailer and the nature of the resource moves from depletion to consumption. It also offers possibilities for more sustainable supply.

IoT data allows us to see how a resource is used. For example, does the homeowner microwave or stove heat the beans, how are they used in combination with other foods, what times of day are they consumed and by whom? Access to such detailed data reveals opportunities to create new offers and for the provider to engage in dialogue with the homeowner to improve their experience.

However, data sharing at this level raises concerns about privacy and vulnerability. Our current research is addressing this important issue.

We started researching in the domain of medical data, as we perceive this as the most sensitive data and the principles of privacy and confidentiality are paramount. With medical data, we have found that people do evaluate the risk and benefit of sharing.

However, we find that the majority of patient’s share their medical data. Some of the possible interpretations of this finding is that individuals neglect the potential risk or over-estimate the potential benefit. Another possible interpretation is that patients do not fully understand the implications of sharing and quite how many people can access it. There is more work to be done here.

In a different study, we focused on assessing perceived individual vulnerability towards sharing personal data. We find that people overestimate the likelihood of rare types of data loss and underestimate of the most common  and most likely types of data loss. When it comes to data relating to their finances (credit card or bank account details) or account access (passwords to different websites, or social media) people are rightly careful.

This was met with challenges as we found that individuals tend to be generally risk-taking, and do not feel vulnerable with regards to  their identity data, email address, affiliation, etc. Identity data can be used to masquerade as someone else and causes one of the most common and eminent threats today. .

Our latest work seeks to measure individual risk-taking and risk perception for data, and we created a psychometric scale Cyber-Domain-Specific Risk-Taking Scale (CyberDOSPERT). Institutions tend to judge and model data loss from a financial point of view. Our findings show this differs from consumers who do not assess their information privacy from a financial point of view, but rather from an ethical standpoint.

The work suggests modelling risk associated with consumer data loss purely on financial terms is wrong and models needs to factor in the ethical judgements made by the consumer in the case of data breach.

We want your feedback on the new Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School building

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As part of an exciting new research project, the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School are looking to gather opinions on their new building.

Opened in April 2017, Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School is a flagship space to attract international and home students, facilitate links with businesses, and provide collaborative spaces for staff to work together.

Stride Treglown (the building architects), ISG (building contractors) and Godfrey Syrett (furniture suppliers) and UWE Bristol Business School are collaborating on this research project to explore personal, emotional and sensory user experiences of the building through the use of social media and photography.

They want to hear from staff, students and visitors on how they have used the building.  Over the next year, they are asking everyone to take photos to show how they are using the building and how they feel about the building.

Participants can then post their pictures on Instagram using #myUWEBBSview or you can email your pictures and comments to myUWEBBSview@uwe.ac.uk

The research project is led by Harriet Shortt, Associate Professor in Organisation Studies at UWE Bristol.

Take a look at the project website for more details.

 

 

 

International Women’s Day at UWE Bristol

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Come help us celebrate the entrepreneurial, political, social and cultural achievements of women, and their acts of courage and determination in the pursuit of gender parity in their workplaces, communities and countries.

To mark the day, we have planned a series of events and workshops at UWE which are all free to attend and open to all.

Alongside the events there will be stalls set up through the Atrium showcasing the amazing work that women in our region produce.

There will be a charity raffle with prizes including a Spa day from The Gainsborough Bath Spa, two tickets to the Affordable Art Fair in London, a coaching session from Sequoia Bridge as well as many more. All proceeds from the raffle will go to Bristol charity one25 who reach out to women trapped in, or vulnerable to, street sex work, supporting them to break free and build new lives away from violence, poverty and addiction. Further information can be found here!

There will be a free lunch provided by Bini Fine Foods for all attendees.

In order to register for this event, please email: fbl.execsupport@uwe.ac.uk 

Agenda

Arrival & Refreshments

10.00 – 10.15

Welcome

6X269

10.15 – 10.45

Female entrepreneurs: Inspirational case studies 6X269
Refreshments

11.00 – 12.00

Panel discussion: ‘Barriers to and opportunities for enabling more successful women in business’

·         Professor Jane Roscoe (Chair) – Pro Vice Chancellor and Executive Dean, ACE

·         Kalpna Woolf – Award winning ex BBC Head. Author -Spice Yourself Slim

·         Sado Jirde – Director of Black South West Network (BSWN)

·         Vashti Seth – Success Redefined Coach

·         Professor Sue Durbin – Professor in Human Resource Management

6X269
Lunch

International Women’s Day Choir

Stalls ran by female entrepreneurs

Raffle announcement

Drop in sessions

Available between 12.00-14.00

Screening of Barefoot in Business

This is a film created by BAFTA award winning film maker Carol Cooke about female entrepreneurs in Uganda.

7X201

13.15- 14:15

CV Surgery

Careers Space X Block

13.15-14.15

Speed Mentoring

Speed mentoring (with a focus on enterprise)

TE Space

Workshops

14.20-15.00

Athena SWAN Workshop

The Role of Athena SWAN in engaging gender equality in UK university settings: Accreditation or lever of change?’

2X116

14.20-15.15 Creating and Telling your Leadership Story

3X105

15.20-15.50 Difficult Conversations

‘Based on one of UWEs Learning and Development Centre courses, this will workshop will leave you with some tips on how to better handle difficult conversations.’

 

2X116

 

 

Wandering about Bristol

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Throughout 2015 – 2017, Senior Lecturer Pam Seanor has been working on the Wandering about Bristol project.

Wandering about Bristol is a Small Research Grant for the project ‘Thinking urban spaces differently: Articulating and contesting “green” imageries of Bristol as an enterprising city’ and is supported by the British Academy and Leverhulme Trust.

The project involved three collective walks and culminated in a workshop at the Arnolfini.

The workshop was attended by those who had participated in the 3 wanders including initiative, local government, consultants, architects, landscape architects and artists to name a few.

The workshop was opened by David Relph, Director of Bristol Health Partners who set the scene for the importance of people feeling they have power to act and how Health is about a connection with place.

A short film of the wanders was shown during the workshop.

The findings from the workshop will be shared in the few months.

Bristol Business School 2017 round up

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As 2017 comes to a close we want to share with you some of our highlights from the past year:

Back in January we launched our new Research Centres and groups.

In February, we helped alumnus Jeremiah Daliel’s launch his first book, inspired by his real life experiences 

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Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School students at the UWE Talent awards

At the UWE Talent awards in March, students from the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School won 5 categories and were runners up in 5 categories.

In April, we opened the doors to our £55 million new building which is now home to the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School.

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Bristol Business School

We invited our alumni to be some of the first to visit the building at a networking event in May.

In June, we announced our 5 year partnership with Glastonbury Festival.

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Steve West and Fiona Jordan at Glastonbury Festival

July saw us celebrate our student success at our Graduation ceremonies. The ceremonies in July included the first cohort of students from our partnership University, Villa College in the Maldives.

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Our Villa College students at Graduation 

Bristol Business School academic Svetlana Cicmil was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award for Research in August.

Research Achievement Award
Svetlana Cicmil

In September, the Times Higher Education awards shortlisted the Bristol Business School as Business School of the Year.

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Bristol Business School nominated for Business School of the Year

October saw our first cohort from the Hire Association Europe and Event Hire Association finish their ILM Level 5 in Leadership and Management. Read about how the Bristol Business School helped them develop a qualification for the industry in this case study.

In November, we announced our partnership with the Aldridge Foundation with a guest blog from Sir Rod Aldridge.

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Sir Rod Aldridge

Finally, in December one of our students was named CIPD West of England Branch Student of the Year.

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CIPD Student of the Year 

To see more of our highlights from 2017 visit our blog. Roll on 2018!

“The chancellor is out of ideas. Today’s budget is one to forget” Associate Professor Dr Jo Michell comments on the budget

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Associate Professor in Economics Dr Jo Michell provides comment on today’s budget: 

It is unlikely that UK Chancellor Phillip Hammond was looking forward to his budget speech. He would have seen the latest economic forecasts from the independent Office for Budget Responsibility. There is no way to spin them as good news.

The newspaper front pages will not make for comfortable reading.

The OBR is tasked with producing detailed forecasts of the UK economy. These forecasts form the basis for evaluation of the Government’s performance against the rules it sets itself on public debt.

In reality, the rules change so often they have little meaning. Today was no exception. By reclassifying housing associations as “private” institutions and fiddling the accounting rules for the upcoming privatisation of RBS, the chancellor conjured up extra £5bn a year of spending – a trivially small amount.

The OBR forecasts of the outlook for the UK economy are of more interest: they are the nearest thing we have to official projections of our future prospects for income, employment and prosperity.

Since its inception in 2010, the OBR has been wrong about one of the most important economic indicators: labour productivity. This is a measure of the goods and services produced on average by each worker. Without productivity growth, living standards can’t rise.

The OBR has consistently over-estimated productivity, as the chart below shows. Twice a year for the last seven years, the OBR has predicted a return to pre-crisis trend growth of two per cent per annum. It was wrong every time: productivity growth has averaged near enough zero over the period.

chart1

In its latest forecasts, the OBR admitted defeat and downgraded productivity forecasts to 1.5%, in line with recent projections by the Bank of England. While these look optimistic given the recent performance, the implications for growth, incomes and public services are dramatic. Government revenues are predicted to be £20bn per year lower than previously forecast. By 2022, wages will still be more than £500 per year lower than in 2007. And this is without taking the possible effects of a ‘hard Brexit’ into account.

Against such a dismal backdrop, the chancellor’s announcement of new productivity-boosting measures, such as an R&D tax credit, inevitably rang hollow.

To try and sugar the pill, the chancellor announced a few short-term giveaways. The most headline-grabbing was the abolition of stamp duty for first-time house-buyers. This might sound like a welcome boost for young people looking to get a foot on the housing ladder. But the OBR were quick to debunk this: they predict that the resulting increase in house prices will exceed  savings on stamp duty: “prices paid by first-time buyers would actually be higher with the relief than without it. Thus the main gainers from the policy are people who already own property, not the first time buyers themselves.” (p. 128).

Instead of given a leg-up to young people struggling to own a home, the chancellor has poured petrol on the fire and given another hand-out to the already-wealthy.

This will only increase the severity of the debt problem that the chancellor didn’t mention in today’s speech: the debt of UK households. Research at UWE Bristol has found that, while austerity has so far failed to reduce public debt, it has been accompanied by ever-faster growth of household debt. As the chart below shows, for every £2bn the chancellor has cut from the deficit, the rate at which households take on new debt has increased by £1bn.

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Nothing in today’s budget will reverse this trend. With incomes set to stagnate for years, and households already struggling, more will be forced to take on debt to make ends meet.

The chancellor had the opportunity to recognise the scale of the challenges faced by the country – flat productivity, unaffordable housing, stagnant incomes and government services pushed to the limit – and to announce a real change in direction. He should have announced a significant programme of public investment – in infrastructure, in R&D and in housing.

Instead, he did nothing of substance: a couple of new tax cuts and another nudge for house prices.

The chancellor is out of ideas. Today’s budget is one to forget.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five things businesses can do to become digitally savvy

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Author: Tim Hughes, Professor of Applied Marketing 

In recent years, digital marketing has fundamentally changed the nature of communication with customers. This is true of both Business-to-Consumer and Business-to-Business markets. Digital marketing captured 48% of U.K advertising revenue in 2016.

  • Update your website – For commercial and non-commercial organisations your website is your shop window to the world. It needs to reflect your brand values and be easy to use. Websites built on older platforms may be expensive to update. Using a specialist agency may be the best way to create a new website, although building your own is relatively simple.
  • Ensure your customers can find you – Get familiar with Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), Pay Per Click (PPC), advertising and email marketing, then use these to direct traffic to your website.
  • Engage your customers and potential customers – Social Media provides a great opportunity to talk to people with particular interests and profiles. Success in this is all about developing stimulating content over a sustained period.
  • Listen to your customers- Social Media, Blogs and Customer Review sites allow you to hear what customers are saying without having to commission expensive research.
  • Use data effectively – Understanding Data Analytics is the key to making the most of the extensive data that is created digitally. Use analytics to see what’s working and what isn’t.

Digital marketing can be daunting for small and medium companies and organisations. Using an agency may be a solution for some, but this can be expensive and does not necessarily provide an integrated solution. Another way is to equip your own staff with the skills to manage your digital marketing. Bristol Business School offers a Digital Marketing Institute qualification to support this (link). The next course runs from February 2018. See here for more information.

UWE Bristol and the BLCC (Bristol Leadership and Change Centre) in the USA-Mexican borderlands as part of a research project

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As part of a research project lead by Dr Hugo Gaggiotti (UWE FBL BLCC) titled “Organising in the borderlands: applying research to support families, children and youngsters in Mexican-USA borderlands (Ciudad Juarez, Mexico)”, UWE Bristol and the BLCC under took a visit to Mexico to take part in a bilateral conference. The project is  supported by the British Academy of Social Sciences and the Newton Fund.

The bilingual conference was celebrated in the borderland cities of El Paso (USA) and Ciudad Juarez (Mexico).

The main discussions moved around the redefinition and creation of new borderlands and frontiers in the context of Brexit and Trump’s administration and what is currently discussed in the academic literature as the “age of post-truth management and organising”.

To find out more about the project, please email Hugo.Gaggiotti@uwe.ac.uk

Professor Lukumon Oyedele gives Keynote Speech at CIMA Regional Conference

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Professor Lukumon Oyedele was invited to give the Keynote Speech at the CIMA Regional Conference: “Reflect, re-plan and respond” which was held at Celtic Manor on Friday 6th October.

Professor Oyedele attended the conference alongside Debbie Sturge, several Research Assistants and some PG students.

His Keynote on Big Data, looked at the challenges and opportunities for Businesses.

The conference was attended by a broad range of finance professionals  representing regional companies such as Computershare and  Nationwide.

CIMA Group-001

The Conference also heard from Leo Ringer of Global Counsel who gave a very clear economic analysis of the current state of Brexit,  and Justin Urquart Stewart  of Seven Investment Management (7IM) and radio and TV fame on the current investment environment in the UK.

Thanks to will James, Area Chairman of CIMA, for inviting the Business School to contribute to this event and to Lukemon for an excellent and well received presentation.

Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School Research Showcase

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Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School invite you to their Research Showcase on Wednesday 11 October at the Bristol Business School.

The showcase will celebrate the breadth of research within both schools in Leadership, Operations, Economic Analysis, Law, Legal Policy and Reform, Marketing, Enterprise, Entrepreneurship and Human Resource Management.

Throughout the showcase there will be 16 workshops taking place that will demonstrate the ways our leading edge researchers achieve real world impact, advanced knowledge, inspire people and transform futures.

The schedule for the day is as follows:

14.15 – 14.50: Registration & Refreshments, Atrium

15.00 – 15.10: Welcome Speech, lecture Theatre, 2X112

15.15 – 15.50: Showcase, Lecture Theatre, 2X112

15.55 – 16.25: Workshop 1, Assorted Rooms

16.35 – 17.05: Workshop 2, Assorted Rooms

17.10 – 18.00: Networking, Atrium

The workshops on offer are:

Workshop 1 (15:55 – 16:25)

  • Improving health and wellbeing through leadership and behaviour change – Bristol Leadership and Change Centre. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Creating Connections: The Entrepreneurial Mind-set and Ecosystem – Bristol Collaborative Entrepreneurship Research Group. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Rights, Citizenship and Nationality – Centre for Applied Legal Research. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Financial Crime – Centre for Applied Legal Research. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • The Changing Terrain of Employability and Careers – Human Resources, Work and Employment Research. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Delivering Value – How new technology continues to drive Business Model evolution – Innovation, Operations Management and Supply. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Working Effectively With Marketing Agencies – Applied Marketing Group; Rigorous Research, Impact on Practice. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Five things you should know about modern financial systems and the economy – Bristol Centre for Economics and Finance. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.

Workshop 2 (16:35 – 17:05)

  • Digital marketing: what everyone needs to know? – Applied Marketing Group; Rigorous Research, Impact on Practice. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Creative approaches to leadership and organisation development – Bristol Leadership and Change Centre. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Entrepreneurial Approaches to ‘Wicked’ or Intractable Problems – Bristol Collaborative Entrepreneurship Research Group. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Criminal Justice – Centre for Applied Legal Research. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Delivering Value – How new technology continues to drive Business Model evolution – Innovation, Operations Management and Supply. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Law, Vulnerability and Protection – Centre for Applied Legal Research. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Applying research to address policy issues – Bristol Centre for Economics and Finance. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.
  • Contemporary issues in reward management – Human Resources, Work and Employment Research. In order to attend please register via Eventbrite.

More information about the event and registration can be found here.