International Family Violence and Child Victimization Research Conference

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International gender and sexual violence prevention researchers: Dr Helen Bovill, Professor Victoria Banyard, Dr Sarah McMahon, and Dr Katie Edwards will form a symposium to discuss violence prevention work from a Uk University (UWE), and United States Universities: University of New Hampshire (UNH) and Rutgers University of New Jersey. Please contact any of the authors below for further details regarding their research or this conference.

Helen Bovill is Associate Head of Department Research and Scholarship. Department of Education and Childhood, UWE. Dr Bovill’s research interests include understanding gender based violence and university initiatives and practices aimed at countering this culture. @education_uwe    @HelenBovill

 

 

Victoria Banyard is a Professor in the Department of Psychology (UNH) with an affiliation with the Justice Studies Program. She is a research and evaluation consultant with Prevention Innovations.

Professor Banyard’s research interests include resilience after and prevention of interpersonal violence especially promoting bystander action.

 

 

 

 

Sarah McMahon is Associate Professor and Associate Director, Center on Violence Against Women and Children. Rutgers School of Social Work.

Dr. McMahon’s research interests include violence against women and social work education.

 

 

 

Katie Edwards is Assistant Professor of psychology and women’s studies, and faculty affiliate of Prevention Innovations and the Carsey School of Public Policy.

Dr Edward’s research interests include causes, consequences, and prevention of interpersonal violence.

 

 

 

Symposium Abstract

Violence Prevention in a Global and Multi-cultural Context: An international symposium

Interpersonal violence knows no geographic boundaries. High rates of problems like dating and sexual violence are documented around the world, with youth and young adults a particularly at-risk age group. This panel includes four presentations about results of violence prevention work in a diverse array of communities, with a particular focus on bystander action. Two of the presentations describe international efforts to combat dating, sexual and domestic violence among young adults on university campuses in England and in Kenya with a UK focus on micro-aggressions. The other two papers describe research findings from prevention work in two different geographic regions of the United States: the western plains and the northeast corridor. Both of these studies draw from culturally diverse samples of middle, high school and college students. Discussion of the papers will center on lessons learned and ideas about the need to understand how violence prevention, including bystander intervention training, needs to be adapted to consider different contexts.

 

 

 

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