IPO Develops New Tools For Universities

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Marcus Keppel-Palmer, the Associate Head for the Faculty of Business and Law for Pro Bono, was one of the panel members working with the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) developing a new range of Intellectual Property (IP) resources for use in Schools, Universities, and businesses.

The new suite of resources aim to develop a greater understanding on on IP with students and how IP impacts on their future careers.

The resources known as IP Tutor Plus were launched on January 9th 2018.

IP Tutor and IP Tutor Plus

The IP Tutor tools, developed by the IPO, CIPA, CiTMA, lecturers and industry professionals, provides information on IP.

IP Tutor Plus is a resource for university lecturers to deliver IP lectures. There are four modules; creative, humanities, STEM and law, business and accounting subject areas.

IP for Research

Created for PhD students and researchers to develop a greater understanding of how IP can maximise the impact of their research.

IP management tools

The Intellectual Asset Management Guide for Universities and Lambert Toolkit support the setting of IP strategies within universities, and the management of effective collaborations between universities and businesses.

Resources for further education

Before students reach university, the Future Innovators Toolkit provides level 3 Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teachers with the resources they need to introduce IP at any point in the curriculum.

More details can be found here.

Bristol Law School 2017 Round Up

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As 2017 comes to a close we want to share with you some of our highlights from the past year:

Back in January we launched our new Research Centres and groups.

In February, we helped alumnus Jeremiah Daliel’s launch his first book, inspired by his real life experiences.

Back in March, our Pro Bono team helped young entrepreneurs to open a new recording studio.

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Our pro bono team helping young entrepreneurs

Also in March we hosted a Distinguished Professorial Address with Professor Michael Dougan titled “The UK outwith the EU and the EU without the UK’”

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Professor Michael Dougan gives a Distinguished Professorial Address

In April, we moved into our new £55 million building  which is now home to the Bristol Law School and the Bristol Business School.

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The Bristol Business School, home to the Bristol Law School and Bristol Business School

We invited our alumni to be some of the first to visit the building at a networking event in May.

In May we also shared news of a successful year for the Bristol Law School and Bristol Business Pro Bono Business Advice Clinic.

One of our Bristol Law School alumni was elected Sheriff of the City and Corporation of London in July.

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Tim Hailes, Sheriff of the City and Corporation of London

Over the summer we shared news that UWE Bristol had a third rise in student satisfaction and that we moved three places up the Times Good University Guide.

Also over the summer, Dr Zainab Kahn visited Amman, Jordan to work with partnership institutions to engage international students in postgraduate roles here at UWE.

Amman Jordan trip
Dr Zainab Kahn in Jordan

In October, a Bristol Law School student won Student of the Year at the Bristol Law Society Awards. The LiP Service team, made up of Bristol Law School, University of Law and University of Bristol students won team of the year.

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Winners at the Bristol Law Society Awards

In November, as part of national pro bono week, we shared a roundup of all the great work pro bono work we do at the Bristol Law School.

Also in November, Financial Crime expert, Professor Nic Ryder provided a commentary on the Paradise Papers.

To see more of our highlights from 2017 visit our blog. Roll on 2018!

National Pro Bono Week

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Author: Marcus Keppel-Palmer, Associate Head of Department, Pro Bono 

This week is National Pro Bono week running from 6th to 10th November.

This is the 16th annual National Pro Bono Week and is sponsored by the Law Society, Bar Council and CILEx. The aim of the week is to celebrate the breadth and impact of pro bono work undertaken by the legal profession across the year, and to encourage further involvement and development.

National Pro Bono Week is an annual week to recognise the contribution lawyers make, free-of-charge, to many people and organisations in need of legal advice who otherwise would not be able to afford it. UWE’s Pro Bono Unit provides students with opportunities to develop and practice skills associated with their knowledge and studies, across a spectrum from giving legal assistance at the Bristol Civil Justice Centre, preparing Wills and advice on private client matters, advising start-up businesses, advising musicians, filmmakers and animators, to welfare benefits advice with a range of partners.

For Bristol and the Bristol Pro Bono Network (of which UWE is a proud part), the showcase is being held on Monday evening at DAC Beachcroft’s offices. This event is a connecting event with lawyers and pro bono organisations reaching out to each other. HHJ Wildblood will be giving a key talk, followed by a panel about Pro Bono. UWE is being represented by Lindsay Walker and Tish Whitehurst-Goda from its African Prisons Project.

Additionally, during the week UWE students will be running sessions in local schools on the topic of social media and the law. This is part of a national link with the Citizenship Foundation. Farha Chowdhury, Tasmina Juthi and Dan Bell are leading interactive sessions with key stage 4 pupils, alerting them to some of the legal issues around use and misuse of social media.

The Business Advice Clinic has linked up with the Network for Creative Enterprise, based at the Watershed, and this coming week will see students Henry Rees, Matthew Cornforth, Ryan Small and Gabriel Carrera-Mendez providing advice on a range of topics to the start-up businesses in the Network.

Of course, UWE’s pro bono activities will be continuing during the week as normal. This includes the LIP Service (Litigants in Person Service) recognised as Team of the Year at the Bristol Law Society Awards.

 For more information on Pro Bono activities at UWE please see here.

Bristol Law School success at the Bristol Law Society Awards

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Bristol Law School had great successes at the annual Bristol Law Society Awards with a UWE student winning Student of the Year and the LiP Service team winning Team of the Year.

Brooke Lewis (LLB) won Student of the Year from a shortlist made entirely of UWE Bristol students. This is the first time the shortlist was made up of all UWE Bristol students. This is a spectacular achievement and speaks volumes for the standard of our students.

The LiP Service team which is part of the Pro-bono unit at the Bristol Law School won Team of the Year the awards.

The LiP Service team was founded after Lawyers from Bristol University, University of Law and UWE Bristol realised they were replicating work by all chasing the same aim. The LiP Service tries to explain the loss of Legal Aid and general access to justice; which has led to many people not understanding the legal justice process and reluctant to access it alone. The service assists litigants in person with orientation around the Bristol Civil Justice Centre and with information about how to conduct their cases.

The District Judge, Stephanie Cope, who supports the project is a UWE alumnus and involves the local Judiciary and Ministry of Justice staff in supporting the project.

The collaboration between Bristol Law School staff and students, and those from Bristol University and the University of Law is a shining example of a collaborative network between educational institutions, voluntary organisations and the Law Centres in Bristol.

Additionally, the Lawyer of Year award went to Bristol Law School alumnus Samantha Castle who studied her LPC at UWE Bristol in 2004.

Congratulations to all who won and were nominated at the awards!

 

 

 

 

 

Pro Bono work at the Bristol Law School

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Original post taken from the Research, Business and Innovation blog .

Author: Jeremy Allen 

Whilst at UWE Bristol, students studying within the Bristol Law School and Bristol Business School have the opportunity to get involved in a variety of projects from supporting local residents in dealing with community issues to providing free legal advice and assistance to members of the public.

UWE’s Pro Bono work has also helped communities in Uganda and the United States, as well as making a large impact on communities and businesses in the Bristol region.

Undergrad and postgrad students provide all manner of unpaid assistance to businesses, and individuals who have limited access to legal help.

Associate Head of Department – Pro Bono and Law Lecturer Marcus Keppel Palmer commented:

“In this day and age, with the lack of governmental help, Universities who can assist are expected to do so. We have a repository of knowledge, expertise, and students who are keen to acquire experience.”

The numerous voluntary activities, which are led and developed by the students themselves, include the following:

Courts

Offered to individuals with no legal representation, the Law Court Clinics involve Bar students providing on-the-spot assistance to those with no prior knowledge of court proceedings. For two days a week, the postgraduates provide the service alongside a charity at the Bristol Civil Justice Centre. In the same vein, LIP Service (referring to ‘litigants in person’), which UWE Bristol is a part of, raises awareness for those representing themselves, in advance of their hearing. Undergraduates offer training on what to expect in court, what defendants can and cannot ask/do during proceedings, and how to present a case.

Welfare/ Benefits support

In collaboration with a number of charities and organisations, student volunteers help individuals with the wording in their claims forms to maximise success in receiving or retaining benefits. Legal advice is also provided if an appeal is required,  following an unsuccessful claim.

“If your disability benefits are cut, then you can’t afford a lawyer to challenge that, let alone access legal aid because it’s been cut in this area,”

Marcus Keppel Palmer

This work on appeal claims yields almost 100% successful.

Mentoring and Street Law

With a view to helping school pupils learn more about studying Law, first year students from the Law department provide mentoring at schools and colleges in the Bristol area. Pupils can also attend mock trials held at the Bristol Business School’s court rooms.

“This Pro Bono activity provides UWE students with additional skills such as public speaking or team work,” says Keppel-Palmer.

Private clients – Elder Law

Teaming up with charities such as Paul’s Place, undergraduate students from Bristol Business School’s law department offer assistance on matters concerning wills, probate and power of attorney.

Businesses

The business school’s Business Advice Clinics involves students providing basic one-to-one accountancy, marketing and legal support for graduate start-ups in Launch Space, UWE Bristol’s graduate incubation space. One accountancy and four law firms assist with this activity.

“This provides top quality advice to the Launch Space incubators and, for students, networking opportunities with the firms,” says Keppel-Palmer.

Pro Bono business activities also extend to helping musicians get a foothold in the music industry, where legal knowledge carries weight. BMAS is a system of clinics and one-to-ones run by law students who meet with budding musicians and other creatives from all over the world. The free legal service includes advice on publishing deals, contracts etc.

Crime

Pro Bono work has also enabled volunteers to work with countries in East Africa. With a focus on Kenya and Uganda, the African Prisons Project encourages prisoners to study Law to understand their legal rights. The service enables inmates to be in a stronger position to challenge their cases.

The Anti Death-Penalty Group is aimed at students interested in crime and criminology. This activity enables them to raise awareness about death row by working with a law firm in Virginia (US), where undergraduates can also attend a five-week summer placement. Some have worked on cases involving Guantanamo Bay.

“They often come back transformed after meeting death row inmates,” says Keppel-Palmer.

Community Asset Transfer

Closer to home, postgraduate law students offer free legal assistance in projects involving the takeover of public assets by charities. These are long-running projects and the University usually takes on one a year.

“All these activities provide incalculable benefits for students,” says Keppel-Palmer. “Many find themselves more confident and find that they get jobs out of them. There are also massive amounts of good will generated through the work that is done and that makes people feel good in themselves.”

To find out more about the Pro Bono work that takes place within the Bristol Law School and Bristol Business School please contact Marcus Keppel Palmer :Marcus.Keppel-Palmer@uwe.ac.uk

Awards nominations for the LiP Service team from the Pro Bono Unit at Bristol Law School and three Bristol Law School students

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The LiP Service team which is part of the Pro-bono unit at the Bristol Law School has been nominated for Team of the Year at the Bristol Law Society Awards. In addition to that, three Bristol Law School students have been nominated for student of the year.

The LiP Service team was founded after Lawyers from Bristol University, University of Law and UWE Bristol realised they were replicating work by all chasing the same aim. The LiP Service tries to explain the loss of Legal Aid and general access to justice; which has led to many people not understanding the legal justice process and reluctant to access it alone. The service assists litigants in person with orientation around the Bristol Civil Justice Centre and with information about how to conduct their cases.

The District Judge, Stephanie Cope, who supports the project is a UWE alumnus and involves the local Judiciary and Ministry of Justice staff in supporting the project.

The collaboration between Bristol Law School staff and students, and those from Bristol University and the University of Law is a shining example of a collaborative network between educational institutions, voluntary organisations and the Law Centres in Bristol. This is a great example of Universities and the Courts coming together to benefit the local community. The teams’ hard work has not gone unnoticed and they have been shortlisted for the Team of the Year in the Bristol Law Society Annual Awards.

There are also three students from Bristol Law School that have been shortlisted for the Law Student of the Year Award. This is the first time no student from University of Law, BPP or Bristol University have made the shortlist. This is a spectacular achievement and speaks volumes for the standard of our students.

The three students are:

  • Rachel Chapman (BPTC)
  • Brooke Lewis (LLB)
  • Tish Weavor – Marron (LLB)

The awards will be announced on the 19th October at a Gala dinner. Congratulations to Rachel, Brooke, Tish and the LiP Service team on this great achievement.

 

Successful first year for the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School pro bono Business Advice Clinic

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The pro bono Business Advice Clinic has had a successful first year of operation. Since October 2016 until the last clinic on 10 May 2017, a group of undergraduate and post-graduate law students has conducted interviews, provided advice and drafted documentation for a variety of business clients.

Work undertaken as part of the clinic includes preparing a new set of Articles of Association for a Bristol charity, drafting consultancy agreements for a start-up based in UWE’s Enterprise Incubator, providing a tailored due diligence questionnaire for the acquisition by an ex-UWE student of a local business and drafting a supply agreement for a beauty product start up based in the Enterprise Incubator at Future Space.

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The pro bono clinic was set up by Marcus Keppel-Palmer, head of pro bono legal work in FBL. The clinic has been run in collaboration with lawyers from two Bristol firms: Osborne Clarke and Gregg Latchams. At each pro bono clinic clients were able to make appointments to see a student team with at least one external lawyer present. Work undertaken between clinics was supervised by UWE law lecturer and solicitor, Diana Johnson, in addition to the Osborne Clarke solicitors; Natasha Grant, James Taylor, Victoria Lewis and Clare Lim (trainee) and Gregg Latchams lawyers; Chris Hayward, Ed Boal and Shalini Jagmohan (trainee).

All students who participated in the clinic found it extremely rewarding – comments from some participants are set out below:

Shifrah Walker-Abidoye, LPC:

“I enjoyed being able to contribute the knowledge that I have learnt throughout my undergraduate study in a practical way to start-up companies”

Stefano Pianigiani, LPC:

“I really enjoyed working with solicitors from Osborne Clarke and Gregg Latchams. Seeing how they run interviews has been an invaluable experience.” 

Hannah Walkeden, undergraduate Law:

“The clinic has been a great way to interact with start-up businesses, legal professionals and fellow UWE students” 

UWE Elderlaw Pro Bono Team Making A Difference

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One strand of the Pro Bono offering from the Bristol Law School is the Elderlaw team of students, who are focussed on matters relating to Wills, Probate and Powers of Attorney.

This year has seen the team participating in “Make A Will Week”, an annual initiative run by the Law Society.

The Elderlaw team of 8 students ran a Wills service from the Citizens Advice Bureau in Fairfax Street in Bristol City Centre, as well as at Paul’s Place Charity in Coalpit Heath.

Students met clients, took instructions, drafted Wills and finalised the arrangements and paper work.

Student lead, Brooke Lewis said:

“This is a fantastic opportunity to make a real difference to people and also to put into practice our knowledge”.

In addition to making Wills, the team has also assisted clients of Paul’s Place in making Lasting Powers of Attorney, which can include provision for relatives to make decisions about care home issues. This has followed on from previous sessions run at the Disability Charity’s premises in Coalpit Heath, where the team put on a Q and A session about making a Will.

As well as this client facing activity, the Elderlaw team has produced a series of leaflets, podcasts and posters about matters surrounding Wills and Probate, launched a website and run a blog.

Marcus Keppel-Palmer (Director of Pro Bono) said:

 “I am very proud of the hard work of these students, and am most impressed by the professional way they have dealt with difficult topics with the clients. So many people want to have help from the team that we will be running another session at the CAB in the autumn”.

UWE Pro Bono work nominated for a Law Works Student Pro Bono Award

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UWE Pro Bono is celebrating again after the Law Works Student Pro Bono Awards has shortlisted our new LiP Service Project for its 2017 Awards as best new Pro Bono initiative. The Awards will be presented at the House of Commons on April 26th. Law Works is the Pro Bono arm of the Law Society.

The Bristol LiP Service is a service run at the Bristol Civil Justice Centre in order to give litigants in person greater understanding and awareness about the processes and procedures in presenting their cases before the Courts. The service runs weekly sessions.

This ground breaking project is a collaboration between the Bristol Civil Justice Centre, UWE, Bristol University and the University of Law. Ian Thompson (Law)is to be congratulated on the success of the project which he has led from UWE’s perspective and brought about thanks to his existing work with the Bristol Civil Justice Centre through the Law Court Clinic, which has offered assistance to litigants before the Family Court for several years.

UWE supplies 12 students to the rota and one of them, Manmeet Singh (Year 1) will be representing UWE at the Awards.

LPC students present their Pro Bono work at the inaugural UWE Student Conference

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On April 10th, UWE Bristol hosted their inaugural Student Conference which provided students from across all years of study and disciplines the opportunity to present their research to their peers and UWE staff.

LPC students Chloe Frost, Didem Kekilli, Laura Ramos Montanez and Mun Too were among some of the many students that presented their work at the conference.

Their eye catching poster, which they had designed themselves, showcased the pro bono legal advice they have been providing to a local community interest group which is acquiring use of the former Eastville Library in Bristol through a Community Asset Transfer from the local council.

SC Poster Final

The students, supervised by Samantha Cornock and Diana Johnson, have been able to draw upon skills and knowledge they have acquired on the LPC to provide advice to the community interest group.

The students commented that taking part in the pro bono project has strengthened their CV’s and impressed potential employers at interviews.

More information on the Eastville Library Project can be found here.