PSU Murder Mystery Fundraising Event – March 21

Posted on

On March 21, a group of MA Event Management students are hosting a networking event with a twist. Join them for their Murder Mystery Networking Evening for anyone in the legal profession.

You will team up with to solve crime, whilst widening your connections in the legal field.

While benefiting from meeting and connecting with new individuals, all profit generated from the event will be provided the legal charity

Personal Support Unit (PSU). The PSU help individuals in the Bristol area who are facing legal processes alone by assisting them to represent themselves effectively in civil and family cases and tribunals. You can read more about their work here.

For just £12, you will receive admission to the Murder Mystery Networking Evening, along with a welcome drink and nibbles.

Come along to get to know new people whilst competing against your colleagues and friends to solve the murder the fastest – there is a prize for the quickest team!

Register here or find out more information here .

 

Bristol Law School students come 2nd in the regional heat of the Client Interviewing Competition

Posted on

On Saturday 10th February, UWE Bristol hosted the regional heat of the Client Interviewing Competition. The Client Interviewing Competition is a competition for Law students, who in pairs interview and advise a client on an unknown legal problem. This year 39 teams throughout the country entered the competition. UWE Bristol welcomed 12 different Universities to the regional heat.

The Bristol Law School (BLS) team, consisting of Josie Hebestreit (LPC) and Adam Hobson (GDL) came 2nd in the competition. They will now take part in the National final which is being held in London in March. If the BLS team is successful at the nationals, they will go through to the international competition which is in Maastricht this year.

Senior Law Lecturers Suzaan Rowley and Victoria Latimer with the help of the UWE Law Society, offered training sessions to any BLS students who wanted to compete in the competition. Adam and Josie as UWE finalists went on to be coached by Suzaan and Victoria and were chosen to represent UWE at the regional competition. This was the first time UWE Bristol had entered a team into the competition.

Josie and Adam faced stiff competition from other universities including University of Bristol, University of Law and Cardiff University. The pair were placed 2nd after Oxford Brooks and will now join 9 other teams at the national competition.

Suzaan commented:

“We are delighted Adam and Josie got through to the nationals as the competition was very tough! Client interviewing is a key legal skill that all lawyers need to perfect so this competition will help them develop their interview technique further.”

Congratulations to Adam and Josie!

 

UWE Law students win big at two national mediation competitions

Posted on

Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) students, David Forster and Sara Harrison-Fisher, represented UWE Bristol at the Worshipful Company of Arbitrators Mediation Competition in London on 19-21 January, competing against teams from other Universities, trainee solicitors and pupils.

They walked away with prizes for the Best University Team and the Past Master Karl Davies Memorial Award which was awarded to the team with the Most Creative Solution.

Lucilla Macgregor who, along with her fellow BPTC tutor Sara Whiteley, mentored the pair in preparation for the competition said:

“David and Sara did extremely well in the face of stiff competition.  This is the second time in two years that UWE BPTC students have won a prize at this event, which gives them a fantastic opportunity to practice their advocacy and negotiation skills in front of accredited mediators”.

BPTC students and tutors

The following weekend saw Law undergraduates, Jade Trill, Callum Tucker, James Hathaway and Jack Kaczanowski, competing in the UK National Student Mediation Competition, held at ULaw in London.

The team won the awards for Best Mediation Team, Best Mediator (Jade) and Second Best Mediator (Callum), beating undergraduate and post-graduate teams from 16 universities around the UK.

Their coach, Rachel Wood, said:

“This is a fantastic achievement for the team, particularly as this is the first time we have entered the National Competition.  The students have studied mediation and practised their skills in our internal UWE Mediation Competition. It is wonderful to see their skills being recognised by professional mediators judging them in a national competition”.

UWE Bristol now expects to host the UK National Student Mediation Competition in January 2019.

Rt Hon David Lammy MP launches 2018 Equity Speaker Series at UWE Bristol

Posted on

Rt Hon David Lammy MP, author of the Lammy Review launched the 2018 Equity Speaker Series on Wednesday 24 January at the UWE Bristol Exhibition and Conference Centre.

Lammy, who is an popular campaigner and outspoken social and political commentator, spoke on the topic of  ‘The Confidence to Be: What next for the BAME graduate?’

Following the talk, 200 delegates enjoyed networking and a Caribbean inspired canape reception courtesy of Calypso Kitchen restaurant , the brain child of UWE Bristol Alumnus Will Clarke.

A number of pro-diversity organisations were also in attendance as exhibitors to promote opportunities to BAME students.

About UWE Bristol’s Equity Programme

Equity is an innovative positive-action talent and professional development programme for home-BAME students at UWE Bristol.

It was launched in the Bristol Business School and Bristol Law School at the University’s annual Link event in October 2017 which attracted approximately 300 students and professionals.

Its principal objectives are the improvement of graduate outcomes specifically in terms of increasing professional employment and self-employment rates as well as supporting them to aim for careers which offer promising earning potential.

Equity days take place once a month and include race and identity coaching and workshops entirely facilitated by external BAME professionals and entrepreneurs. Each Equity day concludes with a keynote speaker that reflects the best of British BAME talent.

(Equity Curator Dr Zainab Khan and Race Equality Programmes Officer Alex Mormoris are both based within the Bristol Business School, any queries should be addressed to raceequality@uwe.ac.uk you can also follow the programme on Twitter @Bristol_Equity )

IPO Develops New Tools For Universities

Posted on

Marcus Keppel-Palmer, the Associate Head for the Faculty of Business and Law for Pro Bono, was one of the panel members working with the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) developing a new range of Intellectual Property (IP) resources for use in Schools, Universities, and businesses.

The new suite of resources aim to develop a greater understanding on on IP with students and how IP impacts on their future careers.

The resources known as IP Tutor Plus were launched on January 9th 2018.

IP Tutor and IP Tutor Plus

The IP Tutor tools, developed by the IPO, CIPA, CiTMA, lecturers and industry professionals, provides information on IP.

IP Tutor Plus is a resource for university lecturers to deliver IP lectures. There are four modules; creative, humanities, STEM and law, business and accounting subject areas.

IP for Research

Created for PhD students and researchers to develop a greater understanding of how IP can maximise the impact of their research.

IP management tools

The Intellectual Asset Management Guide for Universities and Lambert Toolkit support the setting of IP strategies within universities, and the management of effective collaborations between universities and businesses.

Resources for further education

Before students reach university, the Future Innovators Toolkit provides level 3 Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teachers with the resources they need to introduce IP at any point in the curriculum.

More details can be found here.

Bristol Law School 2017 Round Up

Posted on

As 2017 comes to a close we want to share with you some of our highlights from the past year:

Back in January we launched our new Research Centres and groups.

In February, we helped alumnus Jeremiah Daliel’s launch his first book, inspired by his real life experiences.

Back in March, our Pro Bono team helped young entrepreneurs to open a new recording studio.

BMAS
Our pro bono team helping young entrepreneurs

Also in March we hosted a Distinguished Professorial Address with Professor Michael Dougan titled “The UK outwith the EU and the EU without the UK’”

md 1
Professor Michael Dougan gives a Distinguished Professorial Address

In April, we moved into our new £55 million building  which is now home to the Bristol Law School and the Bristol Business School.

nb3
The Bristol Business School, home to the Bristol Law School and Bristol Business School

We invited our alumni to be some of the first to visit the building at a networking event in May.

In May we also shared news of a successful year for the Bristol Law School and Bristol Business Pro Bono Business Advice Clinic.

One of our Bristol Law School alumni was elected Sheriff of the City and Corporation of London in July.

Tim Hailes
Tim Hailes, Sheriff of the City and Corporation of London

Over the summer we shared news that UWE Bristol had a third rise in student satisfaction and that we moved three places up the Times Good University Guide.

Also over the summer, Dr Zainab Kahn visited Amman, Jordan to work with partnership institutions to engage international students in postgraduate roles here at UWE.

Amman Jordan trip
Dr Zainab Kahn in Jordan

In October, a Bristol Law School student won Student of the Year at the Bristol Law Society Awards. The LiP Service team, made up of Bristol Law School, University of Law and University of Bristol students won team of the year.

BLS award winners
Winners at the Bristol Law Society Awards

In November, as part of national pro bono week, we shared a roundup of all the great work pro bono work we do at the Bristol Law School.

Also in November, Financial Crime expert, Professor Nic Ryder provided a commentary on the Paradise Papers.

To see more of our highlights from 2017 visit our blog. Roll on 2018!

Presentation of a Paper on Russia and International Law at a Symposium on Hybrid Warfare at the Swedish Defence University

Posted on

In the last few decades the concept of ‘hybrid warfare’ has gained prominence in international security studies. Although there is no agreed upon definition of hybrid warfare it can nonetheless be described as the simultaneous and synchronised use of different instruments of power – military, economic, information, civil, social, political, financial and legal – with the aim to destabilise an adversary. Historically, hybrid warfare was known as ‘asymmetric warfare’ and mainly carried out by non-State actors with weaker military forces who disregarded international legal norms, used terrorist tactics, were involved in organised criminal activities and conducted information warfare. Increasingly, States and military alliances such as NATO have adopted some of these multidimensional means of warfare in blended tactics. The security challenges arising from hybrid threats and wars are today high on the agenda, notably because no comprehensive approach explaining how hybrid wars and threats are to be handled has been advanced.

It was with this view that a symposium was organised by the Swedish Defence University (SEDU) in collaboration with the Centre for Conflict, Rule of Law and Society, Bournemouth University and the Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies at SEDU on 14-15 November 2017. Aimed at facilitating the production of new knowledge and the development of future cooperation the event gathered international practitioners and researchers discussing the contemporary challenges to the international security environment from a Swedish and international perspective. It was notable that participants from the USA, Sweden, Georgia, Estonia, Denmark, Finland, the UK, South Africa and Norway tried to address these challenges from a multidisciplinary research point of view.

A number of speakers at the Symposium focused on the use of hybrid warfare tactics by Russia. It is in this framework that Dr Noëlle Quénivet (Bristol Law School) presented a paper she had written in collaboration with Dr Sabine Hassler (Bristol Law School). This paper was in fact the further and logical development of a set of ideas that the two staff members of the Bristol Law School had advanced in a chapter for an edited collection on The Use of Force against Ukraine and International Law which is due to be published in April 2018. In this chapter Dr Hassler and Dr Quénivet argue that Russia was (and is) using nationality (understood in a wide sense of the term) as a political, economic, and cultural tool to justify expansionism in neighbouring States. Its use of nationality is commonly known in academic literature as ‘passportisation’.

This analysis, drawing on the experiences in the Baltics, Georgia, and Ukraine, have led Dr Hassler and Dr Quénivet to go a step further, examining whether passportisation is part of a wider policy and whether Russia is rewriting the post-1945 rules that are based on the sovereignty of States, the prohibition of the intervention in internal affairs, the prohibition of the threat of or the use of force, the principle of self-determination and the protection of human rights. Russia, so it seems, is using grey areas in international law to implement a policy whose legal implications are in breach of the key principles of the UN Charter relating to international peace and security. It is contended that the policies and tools (eg conferral of nationality, support for the right of self-determination, protection of nationals abroad, threshold of ‘armed attack’, etc) developed and used by Russia are not necessarily unlawful per se; they can indeed in some instances be justified under international law as they fall within its grey areas. That being said, the situations created as a result of this policy are often unlawful (eg recognition of a State that is part of the territory of another State, occupation and annexation, etc.).

Presentation - Stockholm

In this regard, it is particularly remarkable that in all its activities Russia is taking great care in providing legal justifications. Failing to be able to justify its actions, Russia simply denies its involvement. The key question is whether Russia is using the law and the grey legal areas to advance its own version of international law and thus contributes to delineating the norms of international law or whether it is incrementally testing the limits of international law with a view to modifying the post-1945 legal framework. Dr Hassler and Dr Quénivet argue that in fact Russia is not proposing a novel interpretation of international law; rather, it is testing to which extent some less established norms and practices in international law can be modified to suit its own purposes and interests. Here, Russia is acting much alike other States, trying to preserve its national security and territorial integrity. As a matter of fact this emphasis on State security and integrity reveals that Russia is keen on securing an old – based on military security – rather than a more contemporary – based on human and environmental security – interpretation of the post-1945 rules.

Bristol Law School: Entering the Legal Profession Fair 2017 – Wednesday 29 November

Posted on

Are you interested in a career in the legal profession?

If so, this event is for you, as you will be able to:

  • Meet practising lawyers from a range of law firms, barristers chambers and in-house legal teams.
  • Find out more about conversion to law if you have, or a studying for, a non-law degree.
  • Find out about the professional post graduate courses you will need to complete to qualify as a lawyer.
  • Obtain careers advice from UWE Careers and practising lawyers.
  • Come to a Panel Presentation delivered by trainees on ‘Life after UWE as a lawyer in practise’.
  • Obtain one-to-one advice from a practising lawyer on your CV at our CV Clinic (for current UWE Bristol students only).
  • Meet current UWE Bristol law students and look around teaching rooms to find out what it would be like to do your professional law training at UWE Bristol.

We have a regional focus

Our law fair is unique in its regional focus on Bristol and surrounding areas (including Bath, Somerset, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and the South West), and in the information and advice you can receive about the diverse range of legal careers available.

Register here.

Programme of events

16:30 – 17:15  “Life after UWE – meet the trainees” in 2X112

A chaired panel presentation about life as a trainee/ pupil barrister/ life in-house given by practising lawyers. Please register below to attend

17:30 – 19:30 Drop in CV Clinic – For UWE students only (LLB, LLM, LPC, GDL or BPTC)

Sign up on the night for a one-to one slot with a solicitor or a barrister to obtain some feedback on your CV. Make sure your CV is up to scratch.

Exhibitors confirmed to date

3PB Barristers

Albion Chambers

Ashfords LLP

Barcan+Kirby

Battens Solicitors Ltd

Bevan Brittan

Bristol Law Society

Burges Salmon

Chambers Student Guide

Cornwall Council

DAC Beachroft

DAS UK Group

Foot Anstey LLP

Goughs Solicitors

Guildhall Chambers

Invictus Chambers

Knights Professional Services Ltd

LPC Law

LexisNexi

Lyons Davidson

Magdalen Chambers

Michelmores LLP

NewLaw Solicitors

Osborne Clarke LLP

Royds Withy King

Sewell Mullings Logie

Simpson Solicitors

St John’s Chambers

“The Representative bodies

for Barristers”

The National Trust

Thrings

TLT LLP

Tozers LLP

Unity Street Chambers

Veale Wasbrough Vizards LLP

Watkins Solicitors

Which? Legal

Womble Bond Dickinson

National Pro Bono Week

Posted on

 

Author: Marcus Keppel-Palmer, Associate Head of Department, Pro Bono 

This week is National Pro Bono week running from 6th to 10th November.

This is the 16th annual National Pro Bono Week and is sponsored by the Law Society, Bar Council and CILEx. The aim of the week is to celebrate the breadth and impact of pro bono work undertaken by the legal profession across the year, and to encourage further involvement and development.

National Pro Bono Week is an annual week to recognise the contribution lawyers make, free-of-charge, to many people and organisations in need of legal advice who otherwise would not be able to afford it. UWE’s Pro Bono Unit provides students with opportunities to develop and practice skills associated with their knowledge and studies, across a spectrum from giving legal assistance at the Bristol Civil Justice Centre, preparing Wills and advice on private client matters, advising start-up businesses, advising musicians, filmmakers and animators, to welfare benefits advice with a range of partners.

For Bristol and the Bristol Pro Bono Network (of which UWE is a proud part), the showcase is being held on Monday evening at DAC Beachcroft’s offices. This event is a connecting event with lawyers and pro bono organisations reaching out to each other. HHJ Wildblood will be giving a key talk, followed by a panel about Pro Bono. UWE is being represented by Lindsay Walker and Tish Whitehurst-Goda from its African Prisons Project.

Additionally, during the week UWE students will be running sessions in local schools on the topic of social media and the law. This is part of a national link with the Citizenship Foundation. Farha Chowdhury, Tasmina Juthi and Dan Bell are leading interactive sessions with key stage 4 pupils, alerting them to some of the legal issues around use and misuse of social media.

The Business Advice Clinic has linked up with the Network for Creative Enterprise, based at the Watershed, and this coming week will see students Henry Rees, Matthew Cornforth, Ryan Small and Gabriel Carrera-Mendez providing advice on a range of topics to the start-up businesses in the Network.

Of course, UWE’s pro bono activities will be continuing during the week as normal. This includes the LIP Service (Litigants in Person Service) recognised as Team of the Year at the Bristol Law Society Awards.

 For more information on Pro Bono activities at UWE please see here.

Bristol Law School success at the Bristol Law Society Awards

Posted on

Bristol Law School had great successes at the annual Bristol Law Society Awards with a UWE student winning Student of the Year and the LiP Service team winning Team of the Year.

Brooke Lewis (LLB) won Student of the Year from a shortlist made entirely of UWE Bristol students. This is the first time the shortlist was made up of all UWE Bristol students. This is a spectacular achievement and speaks volumes for the standard of our students.

The LiP Service team which is part of the Pro-bono unit at the Bristol Law School won Team of the Year the awards.

The LiP Service team was founded after Lawyers from Bristol University, University of Law and UWE Bristol realised they were replicating work by all chasing the same aim. The LiP Service tries to explain the loss of Legal Aid and general access to justice; which has led to many people not understanding the legal justice process and reluctant to access it alone. The service assists litigants in person with orientation around the Bristol Civil Justice Centre and with information about how to conduct their cases.

The District Judge, Stephanie Cope, who supports the project is a UWE alumnus and involves the local Judiciary and Ministry of Justice staff in supporting the project.

The collaboration between Bristol Law School staff and students, and those from Bristol University and the University of Law is a shining example of a collaborative network between educational institutions, voluntary organisations and the Law Centres in Bristol.

Additionally, the Lawyer of Year award went to Bristol Law School alumnus Samantha Castle who studied her LPC at UWE Bristol in 2004.

Congratulations to all who won and were nominated at the awards!

 

 

 

 

 

Back to top