One Planet Development in Wales: A Sustainable Future?

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Written by Rachel Kelway-Lewis, LLM and member of the Environmental Law and Sustainability Research Group

The Institute of Public Policy Research[1] of UK has urged that ‘the historical disregard of environmental considerations in most areas of policy has been a catastrophic mistake’[2] which suggests that policy, in many instances, is failing to protect the environment. Thus, as international obligations prioritises the need for policy to promote sustainability[3] it seems necessary to begin analysing the policies which claim to do so.

One Planet Development

The Welsh Assembly Government has created the One Planet Development policy[4] (hereafter referred to as OPD) with the objective of adhering to global sustainable development targets. The OPD policy aims to encourage individuals, families and co-operatives alike to create residential developments that are either low impact, or do not significantly degrade the environment.[5] Such developments are required to meet 65% of the residents’ basic needs from the land within the first five years, including income, energy and food. The mere creation of such a policy could be deemed an achievement, however in practice, the policy appears to be facing some challenges.

OPD Challenges

The flow chart below identifies the key concerns challenging the policy’s implementation, and classifies the concerns as legal, non-legal, and procedural. The flow chart visualises the issues, the result of the issues and, the underlying constraint.

It is evident that the content of OPD policy[6] has the potential to intrinsically meet all three pillars of sustainable development (i.e., economic, social and environmental), however implementation related challenges may be restricting this. Research suggests that there is a resource deficiency within local planning authorities which is affecting the policy’s implementation from planning applications to monitoring OPD settlements’ progress. Thus, the policy cannot be successful without additional resources or a change in the policy’s specifications.[7] Despite efforts to support participants through the application process[8] as well as training being offered to planning authorities specifically for OPD developments,[9] there remains a gap which has not been addressed. Demands upon local planning authorities are likely to grow and exceed their capacity.[10] Furthermore, without addressing the challenges, the OPD is unlikely to achieve its’ objectives thus, will not promote the aims of ‘One Wales: One Planet’.[11]

Moving forward

The following reforms have been suggested to ensure that the solutions are feasible, ranging from providing mandatory online training to reducing the reporting obligations of established OPDs. Whilst these reforms are focused upon accessible improvements to the OPD policy, long-term reform is essential.

  • Community land trust

The Calon Cymru report identified the challenges associated with funding and finding suitable land due to increased prices.[12] Thus, the short-term reform suggestion to promote community land trusts is based upon a successful case in London[13] and more recently, the prospective plan to establish the first Welsh community land trusts in Solva, Pembrokeshire.[14] Furthermore, by creating community land trusts partnerships with housing associations such as Ateb[15] and ceiling prices on land for such projects, funds and prices could be more accessible. Such reform could benefit the community, promote UN Sustainable Development Goals 11,[16] the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act[17] and the ‘Improving lives and Communities, homes in Wales’ scheme[18] throughout Wales. 

  • Public Transport

The long-term regional reform of improving public transport links within rural Wales could result in additional suitable land being accessible for such projects. Such improvements could also support many of Wales’ objectives at all levels, from the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act[19] to the Paris Agreement[20] and UN Sustainable Development Goals 11.2.[21]

  • Low carbon building

Nationally, more must be done to promote accessible, low-carbon building. This could be achieved by mainstreaming environmentally conscious building methods and utilising training programmes to educate trades people. Furthermore, the establishment of ‘green mortgage’ can promote and incentivise low-carbon building for the public as seen in the Netherlands.[22]

Concluding comments

The fundamental constraint identified is a lack of resources, the impact of which is significant. Challenges associated with the resource deficiency range from inconsistent implementation[23] to failures of OPD settlements to submit reports.[24] The policy will require additional funding to meet its objectives, however in the short-term practical solutions could elevate the strain. Such reforms have been discussed to ensure that the solutions are feasible. Whilst the suggestions are focused upon accessible improvements to the OPD policy, long-term reform is essential specifically with regards to the resource deficiency.

This article is a brief summary of a document titled ‘One Planet Development: a sustainable future? A critical analysis of whether the One Planet Development Policy promotes the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 11 (Sustainable communities)’ which has been published by Lammas.


[1] Institute for public policy research, ‘This is a crisis facing up to the age of environmental breakdown’, Institute for Public Policy Research, February 2019, available at: https://www.ippr.org/files/2019-02/risk-and-environment-feb19.pdf

[2] Ibid.

[3] United Nations, The Millennium Development Goals Report 2012 (New York, 2012).

[4] Welsh Assembly Government, ‘Technical Advice note 6’ (Planning for sustainable rural communities, July 2010), available at: https://gov.wales/docs/desh/policy/100722tan6en.pdf

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] One Planet Council, ‘The One Planet Council’ (Supporting One Planet Developments, no-date), available at: http://www.oneplanetcouncil.org.uk/about-the-one-planet-council/

[9] Welsh Assembly Government, ‘Technical Advice note 6’ (Planning for sustainable rural communities, July 2010), available at: https://gov.wales/docs/desh/policy/100722tan6en.pdf

[10] BBC, ‘Put a stop to eco-homes being built, says councillor’, BBC news, 29 April 2019. Available at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-48084556

[11] Welsh Assembly Government, ‘The Sustainable Development Scheme of the Welsh Assembly Government’ (One Wales: One Planet, May 2009), available at: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sitesplus/documents/829/One%20Wales-%20One%20Planet%20%282009%29.pdf

[12] Calon Cymru Network, ‘Feasibility of a resilient neighbourhood at Llandovery’ (Affordable Homes and Sustainable Livelihoods in Rural Wales, 2017), available at: http://www.caloncymru.org/uploads/1/4/9/3/14932334/affordablehomessustainablelivelihoodsruralwales.pdf  

[13] Emma Howard, ‘ Could community land trusts offer a solution to the UK’s housing crisis?’ (The Guardian, 25 June 2014), available at: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/25/community-land-trusts-uk-housing-crisis-east-london-mile-end

[14] Becky Hotchin, ‘Solva Community Land Trust wins Pembrokeshire County Council second home council tax grant’, The Western Telegraph, 10th October 2020.

[15] Ibid.

[16] United Nations, Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable development (New York, 2015) No. A/RES/7011.

[17] Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015, available at: https://www.futuregenerations.wales/about-us/future-generations-act/

[18] Gov.wales, ‘Homes in Wales’ (Improving Lives and Communities, 2010), available at: https://gweddill.gov.wales/docs/desh/publications/100421housingstrategyen.pdf  

[19] Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015, available at: https://www.futuregenerations.wales/about-us/future-generations-act/

[20] The Paris Agreement (2015), available at: https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement

[21] United Nations, SDG 11: Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable, available at: https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/cities/

[22] UK Committee on Climate Change, ‘UK housing: Fit for the future?’ (2019), available at: https://www.theccc.org.uk/publication/uk-housing-fit-for-the-future/

[23] Louise Kulbicki, ‘Does Welsh National Planning Policy effectively address Low Impact Development in the open countryside?’ (2011) 6. Available at: http://lammas.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Does_Welsh_National_Planning_Policy_effectively_address_Low_Impact_Development_in_the_open_countryside_Louise_Kulbicki_2011.pdf

[24] BBC, ‘Put a stop to eco-homes being built, says councillor’, BBC news, 29 April 2019. Available at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-48084556