Get students engaged with research this autumn

Posted on
I’m a Scientist: Students chatting from class (Credit: I’m a Scientist)

Researchers and technicians are invited to take part in I’m a Scientist.

Find out more and sign up at: imascientist.org.uk/scientists

Connect students with science, their teachers and their classmates in this online STEM engagement activity. Taking part is an enjoyable and easy way to get involved in STEM engagement. You’ll develop your communication skills and gain a fresh perspective on your work, all while showing students that science roles can be for them.

I’m a Scientist: Scientist to camera (Credit: I’m a Scientist)

Fill in a profile page, answer questions, and use the text-based chat system with school students. Everything happens online; you take part from your desk or smartphone. There’s no need to prepare activities or leave your lab, office or house.

“The format was so much fun to be involved in. The mix of science and career questions, along with those of a rather more off-beat nature, kept it dynamic and enjoyable.” – David, genetics researcher

The online activity is available from September.

Find out more and sign up at: imascientist.org.uk/stayathome/scientist-signup/

Any questions, contact: support@imascientist.org.uk

UWE researchers have previously been involved in I’m a Scientist and the specialised I’m an Engineer section, and raved about the experience:

Brilliant – it was a kind of science soap box! I got to pontificate on life on Mars, the end of the world and human extinction, global warming, nuclear power, dreams, light years, my favourite animal, my favourite car, string theory, the Higgs Boson and dark matter,” said Alan Winfield, Professor of Robot Ethics at UWE Bristol.

By far the biggest category of questions was about doing science: why and how you do science, what’s the best thing about being a scientist, what you think you have achieved, or will achieve and so on (and quite a few on what you will do with the prize money if you win). These are great questions because they allow you to explode some myths about science: for instance that you have to be super smart to do science, or that one scientist can change the world on their own.

Engineering and a fear of failure

Posted on

A fear of failure can put people off iterative trial-and-error disciplines, such as engineering. In the past year, a team of locals have sought to better understand this fear in children, by undertaking research (with evaluation designed by UWE Bristol academics) within Bristol primary schools.

Bristol performer – Kid Carpet – led the “Epic Fail” project, with local engineers and representatives from Bristol young person mental health social movement – Off the Record, run workshops at Victoria Park, May Park and Begbrook primary schools.

Each school residency lasted two weeks and included workshops for Year Five classes in Bridge Building, Fantastic Inventions, Wellbeing, Un-uselessness and Song Writing. As well as some creative ways to capture children’s thoughts about failure.

Bridge building workshops were led by engineer Rachel Kirkwood – a member of UWE Bristol’s Women Like Me engineer mentoring programme. Rachel is featured in the video below, produced to celebrate the Epic Fail project in lieu of the live performances cancelled because of COVID-19.

And be encouraged by one child’s song to “Not give up” in the following short video.

International Women In Engineering Day

Posted on

International Women in Engineering Day (INWED) is tomorrow – 23rd July – and is an opportunity to raise the profile of women in engineering and focus attention on the amazing career opportunities available to girls in this exciting industry.

The theme for this year’s INWED is “Shape the World”, and there are lots of ways you can take part…

Or read about some of EDM’s inspirational women.

On 10th June women in UWE’s Engineering, Design and Mathematics department took part in celebrating the million women now working in STEM industries in the UK. They shared photos and stories to inspire other women in engineering. Read more here.

Six UWE engineers who are proud to be #1ofthemillion women in STEM in the UK

Other INWED events can be found here: http://www.inwed.org.uk/activities.html

Sharing the faces of women in STEM

Posted on

We’re joining Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) to celebrate the recently reached milestone – 1 million women working in core STEM in the UK.

Today, WISE are running their 1 of the Million Campaign – sharing photos of women in STEM to put a personal face to those million.

And in EDM we’re taking part too! Take a look at the WISE campaign’s twitter feed to spot some of our fabulous women.

It’s all about showcasing that STEM is for everyone – so why not share your photo today?

You just have to take a selfie with a placard saying what you do at UWE, or even why you are passionate about STEM – then upload your photo on the WISE webpage (and send me a copy – engineeringourfuture@uwe.ac.uk)

Insight into EDM’s inspirational women

EDM women are pictured above taking part in WISE’s 1 of the million campaign and you can read about some of their career stories below…

Senior Lecturer in Statistics, Narges Dailami tells her story, “I am a senior lecturer in statistics at EDM UWE. I have always loved maths and wanted to pursue a career in it from a young age. I was 18 when I arrived from Persia but I had to spend my time learning English in order to achieve this dream in the UK. After gaining a First in Maths from Sheffield University my passion grew and I completed a Masters in Probability and Statistics then went on to complete my PhD in statistics. I am proud of what I have achieved and although my journey was difficult at times, no amount of adversity or challenges was going to stop me achieving what I set out to do at 18.” 
Read about why Head of EDM, Lisa Brodie, recommends engineering to young people.
Or find out how Maryam Lamere, PhD student and Associate Lecturer, finds "being different a strength in engineering".

Sign up to inspire or be inspired at an online career showcase

Posted on

The closure of schools, colleges & universities combined with self-isolation, cancellation of career fairs and face to face employer engagements is putting even more pressure on young people who are preparing to transition from education into the world of work.

But there’s a digital solution – careers fairs are moving online!

LikeToBe (a digital platform that introduces students to professional networking and career opportunities) is running online career showcases as part of their Transformational Inspirational Career Talks.

Their Career Showcase South West is on 22nd & 23rd June 2020.

Over two days, LikeToBe will host a scheduled series of insightful career talks & presentations by employers and their ambassadors. And in addition to the talks & presentations, the speakers will be available online to answer questions and offer career guidance and advice via the forums.

The focus for both days will be on STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts Mathematics) careers, with particular emphasis on:

  • Pandemic issues affecting careers – 22nd June 10am – 3pm – “Pandemic Proof” – Protect Your Employability Post Pandemic (including discussion about how the pandemic might change the world of work in various sectors and how students can protect their employability)
  • Women in Engineering – 23rd June 10am – 3pm – The World of Engineering Wants You!

Student’s sign up!

The online event will be accessible by any student, anywhere and at any time because the content will remain on the LikeToBe platform for up to 12 months. So unlike the traditional career fairs of past, this event will leave a legacy long after the event has taken place.

Students can pre-register for the careers fair by signing up to LikeToBe, in order to:

  • Understand some of the career possibilities open to them in the world of STEAM
  • Hear from a number of leading employers about their business and possible roles
  • Get the chance to raise questions and clarify answers in near real time or later

For a preview of the types of talks that can be expected at the online careers fair, take a look at this recent talk by Patricia Sanchez from Rolls Royce about Transport Travel and Our Planet.

Speaker’s sign up!

LikeToBe are looking for speakers from businesses, universities and other organisations to get involved. If you’d like to offer students valuable insight and real life information on career options and advice, then here’s your chance!

Speakers are asked to create a short video about their career, complete a profile page and be available to answer questions on the career fair days. For more details please contact Antony Jinman (Founder and CEO) at antony@liketobe.org or Anouk Spelt at Anouk@liketobe.org.

Celebrating Women in STEM!

Posted on

Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) have worked hard over the years to transform the face of the workforce, and this June we are joining them to celebrate their recently reached milestone – 1 million women working in core STEM in the UK.

EDM supports gender equality in STEM and recognises the vital contribution women are making, so we’re partnering with WISE, and other STEM organisations in the UK, to help put a personal face to the million.

As part of this 1 of the Million Campaign, we’ll be sharing photos and some stories of the women making a difference in EDM at UWE Bristol. All helping to showcase that STEM is for everyone – hopefully encouraging more girls into STEM!

So whether you’re a women in STEM or a champion of gender balance across sectors, take part in WISE’s #1ofTheMillion day on Twitter. You just have to take a selfie with a placard saying what you do at UWE, or even why you are passionate about STEM – then upload your photo on the WISE webpage and they’ll share it on the WISE Twitter account on June 10th.

You can find out more about getting involved by taking a look at the 1 of the Million Campaign Pack (which includes the official blank campaign placard).

In this time of uncertainty, it’s important that we don’t lose sight of one thing that is certain – women strengthen our STEM workforce! So to kick us off early – here are just two of EDM’s fabulous 1 of the million women:

Co-producing an arboretum-meadow with local eco-warriors

Posted on

Helen Hoyle, senior lecturer in Healthy Built Environments, was awarded FET public engagement funds, for her project to “Future-proof Luton” – co-producing an air-quality arboretum meadow on a former mini-golf site. Helen, along with MSc Urban Planning student, William Cotrill, have been working hard to move the project forward – getting trees planted and local school children involved.

Getting planting

In November, Helen secured extra funding from the Landscape Institute to kick the project off – planting nine mature trees on the selected site.

Production of the arboretum-meadow is a joint project that includes input from the Luton Parks Service, River Bank Primary School, the Landscape Institute and Pictorial Meadows (a seed supplier and consultancy).

Local eco-warriors

Then on 10th February, Helen and William worked with 10 young eco-warriors at Riverbank Primary School in Luton. They started with workshops exploring the benefits of trees for climate change and air pollution mitigation, then moved outdoors into the new arboretum to get down to tree planting.

Read more about the activities with the local eco-warriors on the Centre for Sustainable Planning and Environments blog.

The next stage of the project is to sow a flowering meadow in April. School closures will prevent pupils being involved but Helen still hopes to deliver this in partnership with Luton Parks Service.

Engineers hit local schools during British Science Week

Posted on

It seems a long time since schools were last open, but at the start of March British Science week went ahead, and UWE staff and students were called up to inspire the next generation of engineers! Read on to find out more.

Chatting about engineering at Hambrook Primary

On Wednesday 11th March, three UWE engineering students were invited into Hambrook Primary to be interviewed by the kids about engineering, what future roles they hoped to have and how all of this linked to their STEM subjects at school.

“They did a great job of talking things through with the children.”

a Hambrook School teacher reported

Getting hands on at the Manor C of E Primary in Coalpit Heath

For the second time that week, students got to be role models in a school, this time bringing a hands on activity for the children to have a go at.

The ‘super sucker’ activity got the kids making vacuum cleaners. This was one of the activities developed for the Engineering in Society module, which engineering and education students took into schools in November.

Teachers report that the children loved the activity and the students were equally enthusiastic about the visit.

“They had different perspectives about engineering field and it’s pathways. It was such a good experience!”

said engineering student Harshi Asurappulige

Aspiration day at Filton Avenue Primary School

Venkat Bakthavatchaalam, lecturer in mechanical engineering, (who only recently joined UWE in January!) attended the career’s fair portion of the day on Friday 13th March. He went armed with thymio robots to grab the attention of the Year 5s tasked with finding out what their Super North Star is, aka – what they want to be when they are older.

“The children were very surprised with the Thymio robots and were curious about sensors and how they worked. Personally, it was a good experience for me to see the children interacting with the robots. Awe was all over their expressions.”

said Venkat

If anyone academics or students are keen on getting involved in school outreach, please get in contact – louisa.cockbill@uwe.ac.uk

Alumni listed on 2020 Future List by Northern Power Women

Posted on

Krystina Pearson-Rampeearee graduated in 2010 from the MEng Aerospace Engineering programme and now works as a Flight Systems Engineer at BAE Systems. She’s worked hard to change perceptions of STEM careers, and has been officially recognised on the 2020 Future List by Northern Power Women.

Northern Power Women have added 52 amazing individuals to the Future List, all who have contributed to making a difference in their communities and organisations, as well as raising awareness of gender equality across the North of England. 
 
The Future List recognises the leaders and change makers of the future who are already making a difference in their environments and communities. 

“I feel very passionate about inspiring more young girls to consider STEM careers, especially after my own experiences of studying and working in an environment in which the majority of people are male.
Volunteering to talk to young people has taken me out of my comfort zone but seeing the excitement and wonder on their faces when I talk about my career gives me personal fulfilment. I aspire to help change perceptions of what an Engineer looks like and to be the role model I wish I’d had when I was growing up.”

Krystina Pearson-Rampeearee

The winners of the Northern Power Women Awards will be announced on 16 March at a gala awards night and dinner at the Manchester Central Convention Complex. The winners will continue to be showcased throughout the year, to ensure ongoing visibility for the role models and to use their presence to inspire.

Read the full announcement.

Eco-Bricks in City Hall and Whitehall School

Posted on

Back in October, Sara Williams was awarded FET Public Engagement and Outreach funding for her Eco-Brick outreach project – since then she’s been busy driving the project forward!

(Eco-bricks are made by filling plastic bottles with waste plastic and can be used to build almost anything, including simple furniture and art projects. Weighing an eco-brick ensures its’ quality for building and quantifies the plastic saved)

Children Debate in City Chambers

Children, 6 – 11 years of age, from nine Bristol primary schools, became eco-councillors at City Hall on January 8th – the first Eco-school council.

In the chambers, children debated the climate emergency and thought about how they can make changes in their schools.

Everyone was then pleased to hear from Mayor Marvin Rees, who was amazed and encouraged by the children’s views.

In workshops, the children discussed the issues of single use plastic and plastic waste, learned how to make Eco-bricks and brainstormed what could be built using Eco-bricks in their schools.

Bristol City Council, Children’s scrapstore the Global foals centre and Bricking it Bristol, helped Sara organise the event.

Bricking it in Whitehall School

Following on from the Eco-school council success, Sara went with Bricking it Bristol into Whitehall School, for the first of three Eco-brick projects. You can see the products of the workshop in the above photograph!

In the next phase of the project Sara is running two parent workshops at Whitehall – good luck Sarah, we look forward to hearing how the project progresses.