Case Studies at Developing Leadership Capacity Conference 2022

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(Image sourced from www.cre8rel8.com/we-believe)

The Bristol Leadership and Change Centre is hosting the 12th Developing Leadership Capacity Conference (DLCC) on the 12 and 13 July 2022 with some fascinating contributions based around the theme:

‘Leading to Care – Foregrounding Health and Well-being in Leadership Development and Education’.

Over the coming weeks we’ll be sharing some of the abstracts from the contributors to give you an idea of the depth and variety of sessions that are available to attend online over the two-day conference. Register for the free DLCC conference HERE

Case Studies presented from 10:30 – 12:00 on Tuesday 12 July 2022

Leadership Learning and Development for Global Health: A Case Study of Capacity Building in Southern Africa

Authors: Peter Case1, Rudo Chikodzore2, Precious Chitapi1, Amanda Marr Chung3, Jonathan Gosling1, Roly Gosling3,4, Katie Joyce1, Priscilla Mataure5, Greyling Viljoen1

Affiliations: (1) Bristol Leadership & Change Centre, University of the West of England, UK; (2) Ministry of Health and Child Care, Zimbabwe; (3) Institute for Global Health Sciences, University of California San Francisco, USA; (4) Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK (5) Women’s University in Africa, Harare, Zimbabwe

For the past eight years, Bristol Leadership & Change Centre (BLCC), UWE, has been collaborating closely with the Malaria Elimination Initiative (MEI) to improve the management and leadership of healthcare programmes in Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Eswatini and Namibia. Most recently, UWE has been working with MEI (a research centre based at the University of San Francisco, California) and the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC) on a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation project aimed at providing better integrated and more sustainable HIV prevention services in Zimbabwe. An integral part of our work in malaria and HIV prevention spaces, has been training programme staff in the use of participatory action research and learning methods, typically with a focus on identifying and addressing operational challenges.  The challenges that inhibit health service delivery can often be addressed by improving communication and coordination, clarifying lines of resourcing and accountability, maintaining motivation, providing adequate training and supervision, and removing bureaucratic silos. The training programmes, which sit alongside our health system change interventions are accredited via a Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership (PPCL) awarded by the University of the West of England. The PPCL module has been delivered successfully in Zimbabwe (2017-18) and Namibia (2019-20) for cohorts of malaria control programme health professionals and, since 2020, UWE has been collaborating with the Women’s University of Africa on a third run of the module for twenty professionals working for the MoHCC in Zimbabwe.

CathArtic spaces: Bringing lived experience into leadership development

Elinor Rebeiro & Chris Hayes, Co-founders of Create Relate Ltd.

“Art is an expression of the human condition. It is a reflection of our memories and experiences, which are more often than not rooted in the world around us.”

(Vijayan et al 2022, p1)

Holding onto pain, grief, trauma is known to have a negative impact on our well-being, both mentally and physically (CIPD 2022, Vijayan et al, 2022). In our ‘private lives’ we are encouraged to open up, to talk to someone, to share how we feel (NHS 2021, Mind). This release of emotions can be known as catharsis (Vogel and Flint, 2021) But how does this play out when we are at work? Our work place is a place where we are meant to bring the best of ourselves, to maintain a control over our emotions continuously. Yet we often spend longer at work than we do at home and the work that we carry out can be emotionally charged with pressure, meeting overload, navigating complex relationships and the pressures to succeed – assuming that you buy into the duality and separation of ones home and work ‘self’. The pressures placed upon people during and following the pandemic have also brought about traumatic experiences.

The exploration of catharsis as a way to access deeply felt experiences is one we have been immersed in for some time. Using cathartic images as a way for people to be able to safely explore how they feel about the lived experience of their work lives is at the heart of this exploration. Understanding the shadows and challenges in our everyday lives offers up the opportunity to make sense of ourselves and each other. Cathartic spaces also allow us to recognise that we are not alone and enable the opportunity to make deeper more relational connections with other people. But, what happens when this learning is used for organisational and leadership development understanding? What happens if Leaders are not provided with the opportunity to also connect deeply to the challenges and shadows of their own experience? When we work within, what Herron calls a “non-cathartic society” (Herron, 1998) we cannot tolerate in others what we cannot tolerate within ourselves. This disconnect between repressed felt experience and the observing of and feeling of others experience can make it too hard to explore, too hard to accept or embrace and can lead to the rejection of this felt experience either in the form of denial of its ‘truth’ or through a recognition of the experiences, followed by a refusal to share back the learning for fear that the content is too sensitive, too raw to be made sense of, or be embraced as learning that could support how leadership happens.

Using organisational examples and drawing on our work creating cathartic spaces within organisations we seek to explore the opportunities, often unappreciated, that this type of space and the learning and understanding that comes from it can bring. We will also highlight common and possibly damaging shadows that come from not taking this learning seriously. As a final point we will explore how cathartic spaces can catalyse a rethink into leadership development in its wider context.

HIV Programme Management and Service Delivery in Zimbabwe

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Bristol Leadership and Change Centre‘s Professor Peter Case recently returned from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, where he helped run a series of workshops linked to a project funded by a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant and being delivered in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, San Francisco. The project, which Peter co-leads, is entitled ‘Optimizing Stakeholder Operating Models for HIV Prevention in Zimbabwe’ (OPTIMISE, for short) and has been running since June 2020. It aims to assist the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC) to improve HIV prevention programme management and service delivery. The workshops took place between 4-8th April and marked a mid-stream opportunity to review progress to date and plan activities for the remainder of the project. Using participative action research as the main approach to leading change, the intervention seeks to integrate HIV prevention services (which are typically funded by a variety of external donors) and move them forward in a more effective and sustainable way in relation to MOHCC strategy.

The workshops involved reviewing progress with HIV health professionals representing five pilot districts in Matabeleland South, Matabeleland North and Manicaland provinces. The national director the MOHCC HIV Programme, Dr Murunguni, and his deputy were present to hear and comment on the progress updates, as were Provincial Medical Directors and other senior administrators. There was also workshop representation from key INGO partners, such as, the Clinton Health Access Initiative and Population Services International, as well as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and prospective future donors, including the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). District-level research groups highlighted key improvements to service delivery that had been achieved to date and discussed the results of ‘user research’ presented by the UCSF/UWE team. The events were a great success, with strong endorsements for the OPTIMISE project coming from the MOHCC and the prospect of future funding to expand the work stemming from the review exercise.

On the final day of events, 18 healthcare professionals associated with the OPTIMISE project and enrolled on FBL/UWE’s Post-Graduate Certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership (PPCL) had to opportunity to present and report on independent project work that they had completed as part of their degree. The module is being delivered in collaboration with a local HE provider, the Women’s University in Africa, and, as evidenced by the project presentations, is contributing significantly to the strengthening of leadership and management capabilities of Zimbabwe’s HIV Programme staff. Thanks go to the UWE/WUA local tutors, Dr Greyling Viljoen and Dr Priscilla Mataure, for their help in delivering the PPCL presentation workshop. The team is also grateful to Katie Joyce, UWE PPCL module leader, for her support. As with the workshop outcomes, the presentations were very well received by senior MOHCC colleagues and the project donor.

HIV healthcare staff in Zimbabwe begin PG Certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership

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Dr Greyling Viljoen and Dr Prisciplla Matuare (Women’s University in Africa), supported remotely by Professor Peter Case, recently delivered a two-day face-to-face training workshop (18-19 August 2021) for nineteen Zimbabwe healthcare professionals enrolled on the FBL Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership (PPCL). The students are also working as part of a Bill & Melinda Gates funded project co-led by Peter to restructure and improve HIV/AIDS prevention in Zimbabwe. The PPCL module is designed to enable students to combine their studies with experiential workplace learning.  

The PPCL programme forms an integral part of a project entitled ‘Optimizing Stakeholder Operating Models for HIV Prevention in Zimbabwe’ – OPTIMISE, for short. The project, which has been running since June 2020 and is due to conclude in May 2022, addresses health HIV service delivery in Manicaland, Matabeleland North and Matabelend South provinces. The aim is to support and capacitate the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC) in working with stakeholders to develop and implement sustainability plans. This involves reviewing progress on the MoHCC strategy and facilitating the process of establishing goals, priorities and action plans. It also strives to create the necessary leadership coalition to drive change in the health service.

There is a diverse cohort of students on the PPCL module representing different levels with the system: from senior MoHCC directors through to front line staff working in health facilities. Students undertake theoretical studies supported by materials on Blackboard and are trained in the application of the project’s LEAD methodology. There is also a significant ‘supervised practice’ element of the course whereby students are supported in applying their learning.  

Thanks go to Katie Joyce (module leader) and UWE’s Faculty of Business and Law Professional Development Team for their excellent support in delivering the PPCL module.   The main collaborating partners for this work are the Malaria Elimination Initiative (University of California, San Francisco) Population Services International and the Clinton Health Access Initiative.

Multidisciplinary Research Teams and Transdisciplinary Impacts

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In September Peter Case, Professor of Organization Studies at UWE Bristol delivered a webinar for staff and doctoral students at the College of Business, Law & Governance – James Cook University in Australia. Here is a summary of his presentation, talking about multidisciplinary research teams and transdisciplinary impacts.

Researchers increasingly find themselves inhabiting a world in which sponsors demand that their work generate outcomes and impacts beyond the walls of academia. There is an expectation that applied research will yield beneficial changes to one or more of the following areas of life: economy, society, culture, public policy, the environment, health and wellbeing. Moreover, many of the problems that researchers face are extremely complex, if not ‘wicked’ (Rittel & Webber, 1973) in nature.

The challenges of tackling problems caused by climate change or trying to achieve sustainable development, for example, typically involve multiple stakeholder interests and are mediated by an array of interrelated socio-material factors.  Accommodating such high levels of complexity is an endeavour that, arguably, falls beyond the scope and capacity of any single disciplinary frame.

One response to challenges posed by complexity is to employ multidsiciplinary research teams. These teams typically comprise a diverse set of experts who bring particular specialist perspectives, theories and methodologies to bear on a given problem. Multidisciplinary teams thus afford a more holistic approach to the issue at hand and, moreover, hold the prospect of producing ‘joined up’ solutions to any given problem.

Peter Case recently gave a talk on this, sharing some of his experiences of working with mutlidisciplinary research teams in the context of complex problems and large scale projects. He spoke about drawing on his work in international development and global healthcare spaces to explore what is involved in forming teams, managing group dynamics and harnessing collective efforts to meet overall project aims and objectives.

Peter concluded by arguing that enhancing research impact entails moving beyong a strictly multidisciplinary approach to a transdisciplinary mode of stakeholder engagement; one in which academic researchers facilitate and contribute to wider dialogue with partner institutions and intended beneficiaries.

Fighting Malaria in Namibia: A New Cohort of Students Enroll in FBL’s Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership

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Professor Peter Case’s research on malaria healthcare service provision expanded to Namibia this year. Peter’s research teams – including three recent Zimbabwean graduates from the FBL Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership – are currently working with Namibia’s Vector-borne Diseases Control Programme to combat malaria by improving frontline prevention and treatment of the disease in Kavango Province.

In order to help make the overall Organization Development for Malaria Elimination work sustainable in the region, FBL is supporting a fresh cohort of twelve students (pictured) to complete a postgraduate certificate in Professional Practice in Change Leadership. The module was launched this week with a two-day course delivered in Rundu by Dr Greyling Viljoen. By all accounts, the taught programme was very well received and students gave extremely positive feedback on their experience. The efforts of FBL’s Professor Carol Jarvis and Felicity Cargill should also be acknowledged as they have assisted greatly with setting up the course and enrolling the new cohort.

Most of the students enrolled on the module are also members of project task force which is developing and implementing detailed action plans for malaria healthcare improvements in Kavango. Following the PPCL course, they will be working with Dr Viljoen and one of the Zimbabwean graduates from last year, Munashe Madinga of the Clinton Health Access Initiative, to review and further refine service improvement plans.

The overall project in Namibia is a collaboration between UWE and the Malaria Elimination Initiative, University of California San Francisco. The work is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

[Image: Back row: 1. Ms A Augustu, 2. Ms Loise Ambata, 3. Dr K Mapanga, 4. Ms A Ashivudhi, 5. Ms Julie Neidel, 6. Dr H David 7. Mr M Madinga

Front row: 1. Mr S Shashipapa, 2. Ms I Mendai,  3. Dr G Viljoen, 4. Ms E Eises 5. Ms S Haingura,  6. Mr S Nairenge ]

Ethical moments in International Development research with Professor Peter Case

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Professor Peter Case gave a seminar paper last week entitled, ‘Ethical moments in International Development research: Aporia, undecidability and the unintended consequences of ethnocentric ethics’, as part of the Ethics Seminar Series run by the University of Technology Sydney’s Business School. This was the last Business Ethics Research seminar for the year at UTS.

Professor Peter Case works between James Cook University and UWE Bristol.

“Rethinking Malaria” at Chatham House.

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Professor Peter Case (UWE Bristol) was invited by Dr David Heymann, Director of the Centre on Global Health Security, to act as a discussant for a ‘Rethinking Malaria’ conference held at Chatham House on Wednesday 10 October. The conference focussed on tackling malaria in Africa and presenters included a delegation of Anglican bishops from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Namibia. The church plays a vital role in the region because of its ability to inform and influence congregations and communities with respect to public health issues. In his reflections on the presentations, Peter spoke about his ‘Organization Development for Malaria Elimination’ (ODME) work in Eswatini, Zimbabwe and Namibia, emphasising the importance of improving front-line services and paying fine-grained attention to operational challenges; a message that chimed with that of the bishops. Also in attendance was Chris Flowers of the JC Flowers Foundation – a New York-based philanthropic organization that has offered to support Peter’s research team in Zimbabwe this coming malaria season.

Organization and Leadership Development for Malaria Elimination in Zimbabwe

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Picture above: ODME staff and trainees. From left to right: Dr Greyling Viljoen, Dr Gladwin Muchena, Professor Peter Case, Dr Macdonal Hove, Mr Munashe Madinga, Ms Nomaqhawe Mpala, Prof. Jonathan Gosling, Prof. Peliwe Mnguni, Dr Rudo Chikodzore,Mr Notho Dube.

Professor Peter Case returned recently from Zimbabwe where he and Professor Jonathan Gosling have been progressing a project to assist the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) in that country. Peter and Jonathan were both working in Bulawayo when the Zimbabwean military took control on 14th November and, for a few days, had to contend with a high degree of uncertainty as political events unfolded around them and they were advised to remain in their hotel. Despite the difficult circumstances, they worked alongside two other FBL Associate Lecturers, Dr Greyling Viljoen and Professor Peliwe Mnguni, to deliver the first of a series of workshops to a cohort of medics and senior administrators from Matabeleland South – members of a provincial team that has been involved with the wider project since August 2016 and who have embarked on a training programme entitled Organization Development for Malaria Elimination (ODME). The plan is to build OD training capacity in the Zimbabwean health system with a longer-term aim of expanding the process-improvement work to other nations in the region. The training is accredited through UWE Bristol’s Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice and the students (pictured below with the FBL project team) have all expressed an interest in pursuing a UWE-based masters degree. Dr Carol Jarvis, Felicity Cargill and Sue Brown have assisted greatly with setting up the PG Cert and enrolling the first cohort.

The two-day induction event (13-14 November) was judged to be a success by all concerned and several of the trainees made themselves available to assist Professors Mnguni, Case and Gosling with a large-scale workshop designed to address malaria-specific challenges in Matabeleland North province. For delivery of the workshop, the team expanded to include Professor Daniel Chandramohan – a world leading expert on malaria from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine – and Precious Chitapi an OD facilitator based in Harare. Now in its second year, the project will be active in over half of Zimbabwe (geographically) by the end of the 2017-18 malaria season. The work has been contracted by the Malaria Elimination Initiative – based at the University of California, San Francisco – and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project has been approved by the Zimbabwean Ministry of Health and in-country administrative support is provided by the Clinton Health Access Initiative.

Forthcoming Seminars at Bristol University!

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Hi all!
Don’t forget, there are some great seminars going on at Bristol University over the coming months….
…..Professor Peter Case (UWE) will present his seminar today; Tuesday 25 February at 4.00 pm, The Boardroom, 1st floor, 1 Priory Road:
Title: “Taking culture: When state socialism meets market capitalism in Southeast Asia”.
Forthcoming Seminars:
  4 March: Joe O’Mahoney (Cardiff Business School)
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/237.html
11 March: Alison Stowell (Lancaster University Management School): postponed from 3 December 2013
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/233.html
18 March: Dirk Lindebaum (Liverpool Management School)
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/227.html
25 March: Humphrey Bourne (internal), Title: tbc
    1 April:  Aris Syntetos (Cardiff Business School)
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/241.html
Easter Break
29 April: John Morecroft (LBS)
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/236.html
  6 May: Susan Howick (University of Strathclyde)
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/238.html
13 May: Irene Skovgaard Smith (Anglia Ruskin University), Title: tbc
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/235.html
20 May: Niki Pantelli (Bath Management School), Title: tbc
                      http://www.bristol.ac.uk/efm/events/2014/229.html
 Please contact Val Harvey if you are interested in attending: val.harvey@bristol.ac.uk

A warm welcome to new colleagues in the Organisation Studies team, here at UWE…

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The Organisation Studies team here at UWE is growing and we have quite a number of exciting new appointments!

We welcome Neil Sutherland, who joins us as a Lecturer in Organisation Studies. Neil has taught and studied at the University of Essex for the past six years, working on his PhD thesis, titled: ‘In search of leadership: an ethnography of meaning making in leaderless organisations’. In this research, ‘leadership’ is reconceptualised as a collective and relational socially constructed process; as something that can exist in the absence of individual leaders. He is especially interested in exploring democratic organisational and decision-making practices, and the ways in which they facilitate distributed and non-hierarchical forms of organisation.

We welcome Elton Xhetani, who also joins us as a Lecturer in Organisation Studies. Elton has been at the University of Warwick for the past 3 years, working on his PhD thesis entitled: How does organisational architecture affect teachers’ professional identity? A comparative case study based on Sixth Form Colleges.

We welcome Dr Roz Gasper. Roz was previously at the University of Glamorgan (now University of South Wales) teaching OS, management of change, some leadership and HR.  She recently completed a doctorate with Cardiff University looking at collaborative working and the citizen-led agenda with a focus on power relations, identities and critical discourse approaches.  One of her priorities is to publish and to get involved in coaching and mentoring and some of our exciting new approaches to facilitating learning.

We welcome Inge Aben. Inge is a trainer, coach and consultant with expertise in management, leadership and enterprise development in various sectors and countries. She will be focussing on our ILM provision in Coaching and Mentoring and Leadership and Management level 5 and level 7 alongside teaching and developing some of our MSc Leadership and Management postgraduate modules.

We welcome Emir Kullar. Emir is an experienced coach and development consultant and will be working on Organisational Analysis and ILM level 3 undergraduate development focusing on the graduate futures award, certificates in coaching and leadership & management. Emir is also involved as a team coach in the new Team Entrepreneurship programme working with 38 very motivated and inspirational first years. The teampreneurs will be setting up their own companies this term and are already engaged in a number of projects with Bristol businesses. Having just returned from a team building exercise with them Emir has been struck by just how much they have learned in the last four weeks and how engaged they are with the programme. It has been fascinating to be so close to the group as they come together as teams, work on forming their own identity and start to take responsibility for their own learning. Those interested in studying leadership, identity, space, self-development and reflective practice would have a field-day!

We welcome Conroy Grizzle, who is also an experienced Learning & Development Consultant, who will be teaching on a cross-section of modules and exploring opportunities for research on Race, diversity and management.

And last, but by no means least, we are delighted to welcome Professor Peter Case back to the Business School. Peter has spent the last two years at James Cook University (JCU) in Queensland, Australia. Peter will be retaining a 0.2 FTE position at JCU in order to continue working on rural development and conservation projects that he’s running in Southeast Asia and Solomons. He returns to UWE on a 0.8 basis as professor of organization studies and is looking forward to working with colleagues here, both old and new!

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