Welcome to our new PSRG Members!

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Dr Amelia Baldwin

I am a Senior Lecturer in Counselling Psychology and a BPS Chartered and HCPC registered counselling psychologist.  I have worked in various capacities including the voluntary sector, advocacy, NHS services, academia and private practice.

My first degree was in Computer Science and I completed a second BSc Honours degree in Psychology whilst working as a computer software developer.  I began my psychotherapy training in 2003 at the University of Bristol on a Certificate in Counselling qualifying as a therapist in 2007 on completion of a MSc in Counselling Psychology at UWE. 

I am the module leader for the Systemic Thinking and Practice in Counselling Psychology and co-module leader for the Principles in Counselling Psychology.

I have lectured, led training and developed policy and support on issues of working relationally with difference, anti-racism and EDI.  This includes lecturing at UWE since 2012 on undergraduate and doctoral psychology programmes in the areas of ‘race’, privilege, transcultural counselling and feminist approaches to therapy.

My master’s research was an investigation of the experience of helping relationships in Asian cultures.  My doctoral research was a qualitative exploration of British Women’s Experiences of Racist Hate Crime.  I have a special interest in spirituality, intersectionality, social justice, the therapeutic relationship, discrimination, hate crime and feminist psychology.

I am a member of Promoting Psychological Health (PPH) theme of the Psychological Sciences Research Group (PSRG). And I supervise counselling psychology doctorate trainees  and undergraduate dissertation students.

Dr Bruna Da Silva Nascimento

I’ve recently joined UWE as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and will co-lead the Identities in Psychology Module. My main research interests lie in the areas of human sexuality and interpersonal relationships, and I often combine evolutionary and cross-cultural approaches in my research. Specifically, I am interested in understanding how individuals protect their romantic relationships against the threat of infidelity as well as factors that contribute to relationship satisfaction and conflict between romantic partners, with a particular focus on intimate partner violence (IPV).

I hold a BSc in Psychology (2012, Federal University of Piaui, Brazil), and an MSc in Social Psychology (2015, Federal University of Paraiba, Brazil). In 2015, I moved to the UK to start my PhD, funded by Capes Foundation, supervised by Dr Anthony Little at the University of Bath. My thesis explored individual and cultural predictors of relationship maintenance strategies by combining experimental and correlational designs. Alongside my PhD, I also worked as a Teaching Assistant (TA) at the University of Bath and supported teaching and learning in the Undergraduate (UG) and Postgraduate (PG) psychology programmes.

After I received my PhD in 2019, I worked as a Research Fellow at Kingston University London on several projects exploring predictors of antisocial behaviour among children and adolescents in the UK and Qatar, as well as contributed to their UG and PG psychology programmes as a TA. In July 2020, I joined the Centre for Culture and Evolution at Brunel University London as a Lecturer in Psychology, where I could develop my cross-cultural research programme on sexuality and relationships. At Brunel, I taught on both UG and PG psychology programmes, and led the individual differences module of the Psychological Sciences (conversion) MSc.

At UWE, I’d like to expand my current research programme into interpersonal relationships and I look forward to establishing new collaborations with the PSRG members.

Dr Kayleigh Easey

I have recently joined UWE as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology, and am an Epidemiologist and Psychologist. At UWE I will be leading the Psychopharmacology module within the BSc Psychology programme.

Prior to this, I worked as a Genetic Epidemiologist at the University of Bristol working in the Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU), where my research focused on potentially modifiable health behaviours (e.g., alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, physical activity) during pregnancy and their potential intergenerational impact on offspring outcomes. This research had a particular focus on causal effects and the role of paternal as well as maternal health behaviours in and around pregnancy. Prior to this, I completed my PhD at the University of Bristol, where I investigated offspring mental health outcomes associated with maternal prenatal alcohol use.

Before my PhD, my background mainly focused on mental health research. After completing my undergraduate degree in Psychology, I gained experience within the NHS as an Assistant Clinical Psychologist. This allowed me initially to conduct clinical research within mental health departments across Devon, and eventually led me to train as a mental health therapist. I became further interested in the causal nature of mental health problems and how we may be able to improve outcomes, which ultimately led me back into research. I then completed a MSc in Health Psychology at the University of Bath, and afterwards began working as a Research Associate within the Tobacco and Alcohol Research Group (TARG) at the University of Bristol.

I have a particular interest in substance use, mental health, women’s health and perinatal health, and I am keen to conduct further interdisciplinary research to investigate these topics. I currently also supervise doctoral students at the University of Bristol, focusing on pharmacoepidemiology in pregnancy, as well as alcohol use in autistic people.

I’m looking forward to being a part of PSRG as a multidisciplinary research team.

Dr Charlotte Flothmann

I’m excited to have recently joined the UWE profdoc team in Counselling Psychology! This year I’m teaching the first year students Principles of Counselling Psychology and Personal and Professional Development, as well as a few other bits and pieces! I’m really passionate about promoting inclusive and culturally-sensitive practice, and have especially focused on learning from refugees and asylum seekers about their experiences before, during and after migration. This crosses over into my clinical work of course, and currently I am working for a complex trauma service in Bath which supports victims of abuse and trafficking. 

Prior to coming to UWE, I taught at Bristol University for several years and worked in clinical practice throughout this time for a number of local charities as well as an international NGO. My work is widely inter-disciplinary and I have given trainings and consultancy especially on migration related trauma to professionals in many fields and across the world. I really enjoy teaching and learning from students, and have found this to be hugely beneficial to my clinical work (which of course in turn enriches my teaching)! Before deciding to become a psychologist (I trained at the City in London), I was a language teacher in Central America, where I started to gain some insight into the impact of forced migration.

My research interests centre around informing therapeutic and education practice to best engage and support people who are most marginalised in our society, and in particular thinking about the experience of asylum seekers and refugees in the UK. At the moment I am working with local schools to understand the needs of recently arrived young people from Ukraine and hope to develop training materials for staff and families to share best practice. 

Rob Hutton

I joined UWE summer 2022 as a Lecturer in Occupational and Business Psychology. My area of interest is in all things ‘cognitive work’. I have spent my career trying to understand skilled performance in the mental activities of decision making, sensemaking, and planning by individuals and teams in their work contexts. I have been involved in the development of cognitive field research methods which allow analysts to understand the challenges of complex work and the application of knowledge and experience to the assessments, judgments and decisions required to perform effectively and safely. 

I spent the early part of my career (1991-2008) in the U.S. doing work primarily for the Department of Defence, initially as a grad student at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, OH) looking at pilot-cockpit interaction (visual and haptic), followed by applied research for a small applied cognitive research company working all over the U.S. from the big cities (New York, Seattle, San Diego) to the smaller military outposts like Killeen, TX and Dothan, AL (you have to add the State letters after those small towns otherwise… where?). When I moved back to the UK, I still did a lot of work in defence and security, but have also been involved recently in leadership development for World Health Organisation (WHO) and incident investigations and analysis for Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB).

From the perspective of ‘the psychology’, I have utilised ideas of ecological explanations of visual perception to inform the design of digital displays and visualisations, to models of recognition-primed decision making to support the training of situation assessment skills and developing mental models to support rapid decision making. I have also been involved in the development of knowledge elicitation and cognitive task analysis methods to support designers’ understanding of the complex cognitive requirements for cognitive skills training, decision support technologies, knowledge management systems, and ways of working.

I am often driven by applied needs that require an understanding of cognitive work, applying cognitive ergonomics or cognitive engineering approaches. Current interests include the underlying psychology of cognitive agility in decision making, the ‘design of time’ in time and event driven work contexts, and the requirements for the human-machine interface between operators (e.g. drivers) and autonomous or remote robotic systems (e.g. ‘driverless’ cars).

Please get in touch if you want to discuss anything ‘cognitive work’, whether it’s looking for examples of cognitive challenges in complex work environments or discussing models of macrocognition! 

Dr Jemma Sedgmond

I have recently joined UWE as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology. I will be co-leading the Psychology Project module and teaching across several undergraduate modules including research design and analysis, biological psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology. 

I completed my undergraduate degree in Psychology at the University of Chester, before moving to Bangor University to complete an MSc in Clinical Neuropsychology. I then joined the School of Psychology at Cardiff University as a Brain Stimulation Lab Manager. During this time I was involved in research projects exploring the concurrent use of TMS and MRI, TMS methods, Open Science, and food addiction.

I completed my PhD at Cardiff University’s Brain Research and Imaging Centre (CUBRIC), where I investigated the use of non-invasive brain stimulation and cognitive control training in modifying automatic response to food cues. Throughout my PhD I was a champion for Open Science; pre-registering, and sharing data and study materials for all of my projects.

After my PhD I spent two years at Bath Spa University as a Lecturer in Psychology where I was module lead for Advanced Cognitive and Biological Psychology, and taught on modules including Research Methods and Health Psychology.

My research focuses on the determinants of food choice and consumption. I am interested in the social, biological, and cognitive determinants of eating behaviour. I am also particularly interested in the risk factors for under-fueling and disordered eating in endurance athletes; particularly triathletes. 

Dr Kayleigh Sheen

I have recently joined UWE as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology, where I will lead the Clinical Aspects of Mental Health module and co-lead People and Social Sciences (Foundation). My research intercepts clinical and health psychology, with a broad focus on psychology in the context of childbirth and reproductive health. I use both quantitative and qualitative approaches in my research, often combining both. 

Prior to this, I was a Senior Lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) where I developed teaching from foundation level through to MSc. I was also responsible for the supervision of research at undergraduate, MSc and doctoral level. I am currently supervising/ co-supervising several doctoral projects including investigations into the psychological predictors of fear of childbirth, and the mental health of student midwives and nurses.  

I completed both my undergraduate (2010) and PhD (2014) degrees at the University of Sheffield, before moving to the University of Liverpool (2013-2018). Much of my time at the University of Liverpool was spent continuing research into the impact of work-related trauma on maternity staff (a programme of work initiated by my PhD). I was also involved in research investigating fear of childbirth, which included developing a new measurement tool to measure fear in maternity care. As I move to UWE, I am about to lead an NIHR funded bid to continue this work, where we will validate this tool and examine feasibility of routine use as part of antenatal care.  

On a broader level, I am a committee member for the Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology (SRIP) where I oversee the allocation of research development funding and lead Society communications. 

I’m really pleased to join PSRG, UWE, and to be exploring new collaborations in the South West! 

Dr Joe Walsh

I have recently joined UWE from Bath Spa University as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology. At UWE, I will be co-leading the Research Design and Analysis 1 module and teaching across a number of undergraduate and postgraduate modules in Psychology at UWE.

I received my undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Hull, before moving to the University of Bath to complete an MSc in Health Psychology, and then transitioning to a PhD in the Centre for Pain Research. My PhD was funded by a Graduate School Scholarship, and focused on investigating how we communicate pain nonverbally, with a particular focus on body posture, as well as sex and gender differences in this communication process. 

After my PhD, I held a post-doctoral position in the Bath Centre for Pain Research, working on the Bath-TAP project funded by Reckitt Benckizer, investigating the effect of pain on attentional processing. Following this, I took up a position as a lecturer in Psychology at Bath Spa University. 

My research focuses on the pain experience and social pain perception, with a particular interest in pain communication, sex and gender-based variation in the pain expereince, and mechanisms through which pain influences cognitive processes, in particular attention. My work is primarily experimental, and I use a range of pain induction procedures in the research that I do. I already have some collaborations with members of the team at UWE, and I am looking forward to building more within PSRG.

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