Vice Chancellors Interdisciplinary Research Challenge Fund Selection Event

Posted on

On Monday 25 February, researchers came from across UWE Bristol to present their project ideas as part of the Vice Chancellors Interdisciplinary Research Challenge Fund. This diverse group covered a variety of areas, from the emerging markets in breast milk to reimagining dead celebrities in film, and AI training bots for healthcare professionals.

The Vice Chancellors Interdisciplinary Research Challenge Fund is an opportunity for UWE researchers to seek up to £25,000 funding to develop exciting new research projects with colleagues working in different fields from across this university.

The fund had 83 applications in January, of which 15 were invited to pitch their project for 5 minutes at the event, in the hope of being successful for the competitive Challenge Fund.

Attendees at the event were asked to help decide which projects they thought should be funded, with Research, Strategy and Implementation Group (RSIG) making the final decision.

11 of 15 projects were successful on the day. Information on the 11 successful projects can be found below.

The event was a great opportunity to gain an insight into the quality and breadth of research projects undertaken across UWE Bristol.

Thank you to all who submitted to the fund.

Successful projects:

Using Big Data in Critical Care across all Ages to Improve Clinical Outcome

Researchers: Lyvonne Tume and Elias Pimenidis
This feasibility study will use AI techniques to analyse data from patients in intensive care, focusing on sedation, nutrition and ventilation, to improve treatment.

High Performance Bio-inspired topologically optimized and efficient composite structures

Researchers: Mohammad Fotouhi and David Attwood
By investigating and recreating materials found in the natural world, including shells and Mayfly wings, this project will demonstrate qualities which could solve design problems in aerospace and automotives.

Virtual Maggie: technological opportunities and ethical dilemmas in the development of simulated performers for feature films and television

Researchers: Dominic Lees, Marcus Keppel-Palmer and Thomas Bashford-Rogers
The research team will explore technological advances in visual effects (VFX) which can bring back to life a deceased actor to cast them in a new production, researchers will consider challenges this raises creatively, technologically, ethically and legally.

Printing the Muses. Reimaging digital musical instruments through printing

Researchers: Benedict Gaster and Carinna Parramen
This project will re-imagine musical interfaces through printing tactile surfaces in collaboration with practitioners, to be shared as an open resource on the Internet of Musical Things (IoMT).

Drinking water and airborne microplastics; an unquantified health risk

Researchers: Ben Williams, Stephanie Sargeant, Lisa Mol, Tim Cox, Darren Reynolds, Enda Hayes, Gillian Clayton and Kathryn Lamb-Riddell
As one of the larger research teams that pitched for funding, this project will develop a standardised methodology for collecting and evaluating microplastics in drinking water and the air, in order to develop policy around ‘safe’ limits.

From Utility to Social Entity Exploring emotive interaction between AI training bots and health care professionals

Researchers: Rik Lander, Cristina Costa, Jun Hong, Luke Rudge and Gary Christopher
Experimenting with two versions of an AI training bot, this project aimed at healthcare professionals, will look to see how emotions triggered by user interactions with a ‘relatable’ entity enhance learning.

Human Centred Design, AI & Legal Services

Researchers: Dagmar Steffens, Jo Hare and Paul Matthews
By exploring the opportunities that LegalTech software can offer Bristol’s legal sector, this research aims to create a demonstrator to see how companies can integrate next generation services into their business models.

Nurture Commodified: Women as Workers & Women as Carers

Researchers: Sally Dowling, Michal Nahman and Susan Newman
Focusing on the trade between Bangalore and Australia, this study into commercial and non-commercial breastmilk provision aims to understand the impact on the women involved.

An investigation into the effects of cognitively demanding tasks on eye saccade patterns in the context of the early detection of neurodegenerative disease

Researchers: Wenhao Zhang, Lili Tao, Melvyn Smith, Myra Conway and Nancy Zook
With the intention of aiding early diagnosis which could prevent or reduce the impact of dementia with the help of machine vision and learning, the researchers are aiming to develop and test an eye imaging system to track eye movement patterns.

Waste = Resource Bioelectrochemical filters for clean electricity and resource recovery as fertiliser

Researchers: Iwona Gajda, Jiseon You, Tosin Obata, Robin Thorn and Neil Willey
This research project will take urine and transform it through the use of a microbial fuel cell into catholyte, a liquid which could potentially be used as an herbicide/fertiliser in hydroponics.

Immersive inquiry for architectural site analysis of acoustic ecology

Researchers: Luke Reed and Merate Barakat    
By using virtual reality to prototype a system, this project will help architects to understand the acoustic considerations of a site when in the early stages of design.