Fully Funded Inclusive Digital Skills Bootcamps

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Inclusive Digital Bootcamps will help you to secure new or better Digital Employment and are free to register for individuals based in the West of England. Inclusive digital skills bootcamps are delivered by UWE Bristol as part of the Digital Skills Investment Programme

Data Science & AI

Who is it for?

  • 19 – 25-year-olds*
  • Women*

Delivered mainly online with a few sessions at Frenchay Campus, BS16 1QY

*Anyone can still apply to take part, but priority access is given to those who meet one (or more) of the above criteria.

What will I learn?

  • Mathematics and computer programming
  • Data science fundamentals
  • Software development
  • Machine Learning & AI approaches

When does it start?

This free course is running twice with two different cohorts, starting in late November 2021 and February 2022

  • 17-weeks
  • 8-hours scheduled learning per-week plus self-study

UX Design

Who is it for?

  • Those with living with health conditions, learning difficulties or impairments*

*Anyone can still apply to take part, but priority access is given to those who meet one (or more) of the above criteria.

Delivered mainly online with a few sessions at Frenchay Campus, BS16 1QY

What will I learn?

  • Learn advanced aspects of UX design for digital platforms
  • Responsive design for smart phones and robots
  • Specialised support to access ‘Disability Confident’ employment
  • Understand UX design trends for a range of platforms

When does it start?


This free course begins in January 2022

  • 13-weeks
  • 8-hours scheduled learning per-week plus self-study

More information:

Employability Support

Each bootcamp has an embedded industry project element. This will allow you to:

  • Build and showcase your higher-level skills to potential employers
  • Implementing your learning in real-world scenarios

Mentoring

Throughout the bootcamps, you will be paired with an industry mentor to complement your learning and open up doors to future employment opportunities.

There will also be opportunities to access specific mentoring support if you are from an underrepresented group within the digital industry.

Job Preparation

Each of the bootcamps will finish with a 2-week ‘Preparation for Employment Module’.You will be provided with a range of in-person and online support tools to help you secure higher-level employed roles.

Support includes:

  • CV & Cover letter writing
  • Interview preparation
  • Introductions to relevant employers

Contact

If you would like to speak to a member of the team before registering your interest, email digitalworkforce@uwe.ac.uk and we will be happy to help.

Vacancies – Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship

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7-month secondment opportunity

Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship (Green Skills) is a new 7-month project – led by UWE Bristol in partnership with NatWest Bank and Black South West Network (BSWN) – funded by the Government’s Community Renewal Fund.

Launching in January 2022, this project will address the skills shortages needed to deliver the West of England’s net zero ambitions by providing training, entrepreneurship and employment opportunities for young people. The Project will encourage participation from Black British and British Asian heritage young people, in recognition of the employment gap that exists for black graduates and inspired by the #10000BlackInterns initiative.

A major legacy of the Project will be a Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship Hub, hosted on an online platform and accessible to the wider West of England skills, innovation and enterprise ecosystem.

UWE Bristol are looking to recruit 5 roles to support this project. These roles will be 7 month fixed term contracts, with an immediate start in January 2022. We would welcome applicants from private and public sector organisations as a secondment opportunity.

We are looking for:

  • Project Manager
  • Partnerships Manager
  • Mentor and Cohort Manager
  • Project Officer
  • Finance Officer

Project Manager

We are looking for a confident and experienced Project Manager to coordinate project activity and design an 8-week green skills programme, co-delivered by the Project’s partners and external consultants. You will line manage and coordinate the activity of the Green Skills Cohort Manager (providing mentoring and coaching to young people) and Green Skills Partnerships Manager (developing and managing partnerships with SMEs and employers for green internships).

Project Manager vacancy

Partnerships Manager

We are looking for a dynamic and experienced business Partnerships Manager who will be responsible for promoting the project to local employers and securing internship placements for young people. You will co-ordinate and deliver an employer and ‘pitch’ events where young people can find out more about internship opportunities, further training, and incubation support.

Partnership Manager vacancy

Mentor and Cohort Manager

We are looking for an enthusiastic and experienced Mentor and Cohort Manager to provide mentoring and coaching to 5 cohorts of young people and be responsible for ensuring that all participants have access to the information and learning support they need. You will hold regular 1:1s with each young person during their 8 weeks of study and will provide additional support once participants have moved on to any internship, incubation or further training activity.

Mentor and Cohort Manager vacancy

Project Officer

We are looking for a clear communicator with an excellent eye for detail, who is able to offer exceptional customer service to all of the project stakeholders, whilst ensuring compliance within funding regulations. You will need to enjoy solving problems quickly and implementing these solutions across the project.

Project Officer vacancy

Finance Officer

We are looking for someone who is finacially minded, has an excellent eye for detail and who is able to offer exceptional customer service to all of the project stakeholders. You will need to oversee the project budget, handle day to day financial transactions, maintain accurate expenditure records and project forecasts.

Finance Officer vacancy

Become an Industry Mentor and support our Skills Bootcamp learners

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Do you work within a digital skills role in areas such as data science, AI, cyber security, digital engineering, UX Design, games technology or sustainable development? Would you like to share your experience with our skills bootcamp learners? 

UWE Bristol are looking to work with a number of individuals to act as mentors across our skills bootcamps, supporting our learners as they develop their new skills and search for their next career opportunity.   

Register your interest to become a mentor

What is an industry mentor? 

Acting as a mentor you will support learners by providing guidance and share your experiences and knowledge from your area of expertise.
As part of your mentoring sessions, you will look to help your mentee(s) to:

  • Map their next steps in their chosen career path
  • Identify key skills needed for potential job opportunities 
  • Provide feedback on work they develop as part of their bootcamp portfolio 
  • Provide your perspective on your industry and give exposure to best practice 
  • Introduce them to your role or other suitable roles to understand the industry further  
  • Provide a networking experience to your mentee

Why become a mentor?

While you will be supporting our learners, acting as a mentor, you can also support your own personal development. Mentoring can be rewarding and provide you with insight from those looking to enter your industry and for you to learn from their experiences.

Our mentoring scheme will also give you the opportunity to:

  • Engage with our curriculum
  • Take part in a half day mentoring skills workshop to gain new transferrable skills
  • Receive a digital badge to showcase your experience in mentorship

Required skills/commitment

As a skills bootcamp mentor, you will:

  • Have 3+ years’ industry experience in one of the following areas:
    • Data Science & AI
    • Digital Engineering
    • User Experience &Design
    • Games Technology
    • Cyber Security
  • Be able to commit to meeting with your mentee(s) once a fortnight over a 2- 3-month period (this will usually be online)
  • Be willing to inspire, encourage and guide learners looking to start their career in your industry
  • Share your own experiences and examples with your mentee(s)

FAQ’s

I have less than 3 years industry experience, can I still become a mentor?

While we ask for 3 years industry experience, we would be happy to speak to anyone with less than this, that feels they would be able to contribute positively to the programme

Do I need to live in/near Bristol?

As sessions will run online you do not have to live in the Bristol area

Will I be paid for this?

Our mentoring positions are generally unpaid; however mentors will receive half day training workshop to develop their mentoring skills and a digital badge at the end of their involvement.

Register your interest to become a mentor

Introducing our research strength focus: Digital Futures

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At UWE Bristol we are proud of our active and collaborative research community of bold and innovative thinkers that are breaking research boundaries. 

Our four key research strengths are:   

  • Creative industries and technologies 
  • Digital Futures 
  • Health & Wellbeing 
  • Sustainability and Climate Change Resilience

Over the past three months we have been sharing content around our research strength, Sustainability and Climate Change Resilience. We are now moving onto our next focus: Digital Futures.

 Our research strengths in this area include: 

  • robotics, artificial intelligence and advanced engineering 
  • industrial digitalisation, high-value design and next generation services 
  • future mobile communications, ubiquitous computing, data science and cybersecurity. 

To introduce this research strength, we are going to share with you two of our Digital Futures research case studies: 

Cyber crime: Helping authorities worldwide to tackle financial crime 

Being as vast and intangible as it is, the internet has proved one big loophole for cyber criminals – until now. Turning the tables on fraudsters is the raison d’etre of experts in cyber security and financial crime, who are helping police forces across the world to close in. 

“We know that the rapid exchange of information between cyber criminals, and the lack of information sharing across police forces and countries is a major barrier to success in tackling the issue,” says Professor Phil Legg, Associate Professor of Cyber Security. “Our goal is to work with police forces to understand what tools they currently lack and how we can help by using our research intel to come up with a solution.” 

Phil is working alongside Professor Nic Ryder, Professor of Financial Crime, on a multidisciplinary project to address the evolving nature of crime online, and to develop technological solutions for facilitating law enforcement in this globally connected space. 

Much of Nic’s work has already helped shape improvements in how law enforcement agencies across the world tackle terrorism financing and money laundering. As well as training police authorities in Rome, the Netherlands and the UK, he has worked with NATO, the UK Home Office and the Centre of Research Evidence and Security Threats (CREST). 

A seminal piece of work is the development of a fraud typology that enables agencies to identify where financial crime is being used to fund terrorist activity. The typology is a robust toolkit based on evidence from convicted terrorism cases, which revealed how terrorism is often connected to fraudulent activity in areas including immigration, identity theft, credit cards, tax, student loans and insurance. 

View the full case study  

Digital ethics: Balancing creativity with ethics on and off screen 

What happens when you give people the power to raise the dead? Aside from the creative potential for screen directors to shock audiences into paying attention, the deep fake phenomenon which does precisely that, raises a host of ethical and legal challenges. Who better to test the balance of such powers than Maggie Thatcher…? 

Digital face replacements are commonplace in the high budget film industry, with the widespread use of CGI and digital effects by Disney and the Star Wars franchise, among others. Since 2017 the open source, lower resolution alternative of deep fakes has become widespread, providing an affordable means of translating existing images into a simulated context. 

For television and film directors like UWE Bristol’s Dr Dominic Lees, Associate Head of Department, Filmmaking, this is interesting territory that poses both creative and ethical questions when it comes to examining a director’s intentions and the potential for shifting perceptions. 

“We have a moment in technological development that is really exciting,” says Dominic. “It’s the democratisation of what has been an extremely elite part of the studio and film process for some years. Philosophically, it raises questions around why we would want to do this, how we do it, and whether we even ought to.” 

These are the questions that Dominic is exploring in collaboration with colleagues from Law, and Engineering and Technology, via the Virtual Maggie project, digitally resurrecting the former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher for a contemporary short film set in the 1980s. 

Having filmed several scenes with a real actor, they are now testing out open source (artificial intelligence) AI technology to recreate the actor’s scenes with a simulated version of Thatcher’s face. 

Dominic says: “It’s both interesting and rattling to consider whether I want people to completely believe that this is Margaret Thatcher, which I could never do because the audience knows she wasn’t alive when I was shooting this film? Or whether I want it to be slightly unbelievable so that viewers are aware of the artifice of what I’m doing, and appreciate the fakeness?” 

View the full case study

For UWE Staff: Women Researchers’ Mentoring Scheme

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The Women Researchers’ Mentoring Scheme (WRMS) aims to promote and facilitate professional development for women researchers working at UWE Bristol, helping them reach senior research roles.  This scheme provides support to female staff to develop and strengthen their research portfolio, making them more able to compete for senior research roles alongside their male counterparts.

This scheme offers a specified number of mentoring opportunities, which aim to provide mentees with encouragement, support and advice from experienced colleagues in order to help the mentee realise their potential and fulfil their research career aspirations. 

The new application cycle for the Women Researchers Mentoring Scheme (WRMS) is now open. The scheme is open to all women in academic and research roles, employed by UWE, who wish to develop their careers.

The benefits of being involved in the scheme by becoming a mentor or mentee could assist your development and progression. The scheme will entail a nominated woman researcher being matched to a mentor, who can be a woman or man. Training will be provided to all new participants. The application deadline is Wednesday 12 January 2022.

Further details of the scheme including how to apply is available on the Women Researchers’ Mentoring Scheme staff intranet pages.

UWE Bristol to deliver green skills for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young adults to get them into green jobs

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UWE Bristol will deliver Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship aimed at helping Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young adults young adults into green jobs.

The project, led by UWE Bristol and in collaboration with NatWest and the Black South West Network will help the West of England region transition to a green economy.

Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship will be delivered alongside an ambitious programme of skills development and training for people and businesses in the West of England, delivered by UWE Bristol’s Regional Skills Academy. Working with partners, the Regional Skills Academy is reskilling and upskilling the region’s workforce to support economic recovery, meet the demands of a digital and zero carbon society, and provide lifelong learning opportunities for adults from all communities and backgrounds.

Professor Steve West, Vice-Chancellor, President and CEO of UWE Bristol and President of UUK said: “At UWE Bristol, we passionately believe in inclusivity and opportunity, recognising the key role education has in helping transform society, to the benefit of all individuals and communities. We are delighted to have been chosen to help deliver the Government’s Community Renewal Fund which recognises the vital role that Universities have to play in helping the UK build back. Not just better, but faster, stronger, and greener too.

“This fantastic partnership with our colleagues at Black South West Network and NatWest will provide unique skills, employment and start-up opportunities to young people from communities across our region, generating an inclusive pipeline of talent for local businesses and driving the West of England’s transition to a green economy. The country needs its universities more than ever to help drive our post-Covid recovery, to support our NHS and to create good, sustainable jobs in our local communities. We are ready to turbocharge this recovery – fuelling inclusivity, growth, opportunity, mobility, and prosperity.”

This is one of four successful bids to the UK Community Renewal Fund, submitted by the West of England Combined Authority. A total of £2.4m has been secured to support people and communities most in need across the region.

Find out more about Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship or get in touch to request more information.

UWE Bristol academic wins ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize 2021

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Dr Rebecca Windemer, Lecturer in Environmental Planning and Design, last week won the Outstanding Early Career Impact award as part of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Celebrating Impact Prize 2021 for her research on “Influencing policy and debate on end-of-life considerations for onshore renewables”.

The ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize, now in its ninth year, is an annual opportunity to recognise and celebrate the success of ESRC-funded researchers in achieving and enabling outstanding economic or societal impact from excellent research.

Rebecca’s research into the 25-year planning consents that regulate the UK’s onshore wind and solar farms has led to policy change in Wales, greater guidance for local authorities and the wind industry on end-of-life considerations for onshore renewable energy infrastructure, and increased community awareness of the potential to influence the future of local wind and solar sites.

In the context of a global transition to decarbonise the energy system and meet NetZero targets, expanding energy output from renewables is increasingly important. However, space for renewable energy infrastructure is limited and existing wind farms are beginning to reach the end of their operational or consent life. Given tightening planning and land restrictions, keeping consented infrastructure in place is likely to form a key part of ensuring that renewable energy targets are met. There is also potential to significantly increase the energy generated from existing sites through repowering (replacing existing infrastructure with new). However, the context of existing sites and the opinions of local communities may have changed over time. There is thus a need to consider how we make decisions about the future of our existing onshore renewable energy sites, including how local communities are involved in such decisions.

Rebecca commented: “I am delighted to have won this award for my work on planning for the future of onshore renewable energy sites. As our existing wind farms are reaching the end of their planning consent there is an urgent need to consider how we make decisions about their future. These decisions are not straightforward as both the sites and the opinions of communities living close to wind farms may have changed over time.

Directly responding to this challenge, I have used my research findings to help develop planning policy in this area. I have also shared my research findings with the renewable energy industry, emphasising the importance of considering communities over the life of energy developments, rather than only during planning applications. The funding that I have received from this award will be used to further generate such policy and behavioural change, both locally and internationally.”

Find out more about Rebecca’s research. Find out more about the other winners from the ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize.

UWE Bristol research leads international initiative to help transport planners respond to fast changing world

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The way in which citizens move around cities and regions across the globe has been changing in unanticipated ways. This has left public authorities in a predicament as to how they plan transport infrastructure and services. UWE Bristol’s Kiron Chatterjee played a key role in an influential report recently published by the International Transport Forum (ITF) which sought to respond to this dilemma.

In 2019, Kiron was asked by the ITF to write a discussion paper for a working group on ‘Travel Transitions and New Mobility Behaviours’. This was on the back of Kiron leading an influential study for the UK Department for Transport examining the reasons for a decline in car driving by young people. While Kiron was writing the discussion paper, the world was hit by Covid-19 and people’s mobility was severely curtailed, increasing the significance of the topic.

The recently published report, Travel Transitions: How Transport Planners and Policy Makers Can Respond to Shifting Mobility Trends, discusses why breaks with past mobility trends occurred but were not foreseen and makes recommendations on how to plan for a future where very little is certain any more. Kiron oversaw the writing of the report and wrote two of the five chapters. UWE Bristol’s Glenn Lyons also contributed his expertise in writing one of the chapters.

The report highlights how travel behaviour has evolved in unexpected ways in urbanised areas at the start of the 21st century. It examines how significant breaks with past trends happened and why these shifts were not foreseen. It explains how forecast-led transport planning is not well equipped to handle deep uncertainty. The report presents new approaches which explicitly address uncertainty, are vision-led and enable the development of resilient plans. It also considers how governance and institutions can be adapted to support such a paradigm shift.

webinar was held on 20 September to introduce the report to a global audience and the report was also presented to an in-person audience at the 12th Transport and Communication Forum in Istanbul on 7 October.

Kiron and other speakers virtually presented the report

Kiron’s hope is that the professional transport sector will be more alive to how trends and events beyond transport influence people’s travel behaviour and that, instead of projecting forward past trends, it will focus on what outcomes are desirable and how to take steps to achieve them.

Kiron is part of the Centre for Transport and Society at UWE Bristol. Find out more about their work.

The ITF is an intergovernmental organisation, linked to the OECD, with 63 member countries. It acts as a think tank for transport policy and organises an Annual Summit of transport ministers. One of its activities is to convene working groups of international experts to conduct in-depth studies of transport policy issues identified as priorities by ITF member countries.  

UWE Bristol announce Inclusive Digital Skills bootcamps

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UWE Bristol, in partnership with the West of England Combined Authority (WECA), is delivering a series of fully funded ‘Inclusive Digital Bootcamps. These courses are being delivered in response to the growing demand for Digital Skills in the region and to support those whose progression, development or employment has been affected by the pandemic.

UWE Bristol are delivering three different bootcamps to develop medium-to-high level Digital Skills in the region. These targeted bootcamps will deliver both digital/specialist skills and the interpersonal soft skills that employers expressly need.

These bootcamps will be delivered over a period of 12-16 weeks. Throughout their learning, participants will have 1:1 mentoring support and will link with relevant industry to work on and understand real-life digital projects and showcase their skills to potential employers.

Each of the bootcamps will finish with a two-week preparation for employment module, where learners will be provided with a wide range of in-person and online support tools focused on entry into medium/higher level employment opportunities.

The Bootcamps

Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Bootcamps

Starts 8 November

Equipping learners with skills needed to be at the forefront of emerging technologies across different industrial sectors.

  • Mathematics and computer programming
  • Data science fundamentals
  • Software development
  • Machine Learning & AI approaches

Data Bootcamp: Cloud-based skills

Starts 29 November  

Developing learners’ cloud-based skills & creating Microsoft Power experts that will be an asset to any forward-thinking organisation.

  • Master Microsoft cloud-based apps
  • Understand and use Microsoft Power Platforms
  • Access the Microsoft Learn programme

UX Design Bootcamp

Starts 15November

Know what makes a good user experience and understand responsive design for smart-phones, robots and more.

  • Learn advanced aspects of UX design for digital platforms
  • Responsive design for smart phones and robots
  • Specialised support to access ‘Disability Confident’ employment
  • Understand UX design trends for a range of platforms

The bootcamps are primarily aimed at:

  • 19-25 year olds
  • Female learners
  • Those living with health conditions or impairments

Anyone can still apply to take part, but priority access is given to those who meet one (or more) of the above criteria.

These bootcamps are fully funded for adults and are designed to be manageable alongside existing employment.

Find out more and register your place.

Knowledge Transfer Partnership Case Study: Craven Dunnill Jackfield

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The Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTP) scheme is a UK-wide programme helping businesses to improve competitiveness and productivity. A recent graduate is placed within an organisation to help solve a business problem, with access to our academic expertise.

The below case study is from our KTP with Craven Dunnill Jackfield:

About Craven Dunnill Jackfield

Craven Dunnill & Co Ltd is a historic business, founded in 1872. It has been producing ceramic wall and floor tiles for 150 years and is the oldest surviving purpose-built tile factory in the world. It is part of the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage site at the heart of Britain’s Industrial Revolution

The challenge the KTP was set up to address

Each individual project requires the application of ceramic modelling skills to create new working models and moulds for the restoration of architectural features and to interpret the complex three-dimensional shape of the item beneath the glaze layers of an original sample.

This is a highly skilled art, and ceramic modellers with this ability are few in number and expensive to employ. Across the industry modellers with the necessary hand skills are reaching retirement age and are difficult to replace which will significantly impact the future sustainability of the sector. The situation is a major bottleneck in the production process and limits the ability of the company to expand this part of the business.

The application of 3D technologies, specifically 3D scanning to derive the surface shape of the original ceramic pieces and 3D CAD to recreate the aesthetic of the original work, combined the CNC milling can be used to produce master models and moulds for the reproductions.

Why was a KTP the right mechanism to achieve this?

The KTP allowed us to test machinery and processes at the University in a way that would have been time consuming and expensive to achieve without the partnership. The CFPR’s knowledge of both ceramics and digital manufacturing technology were a perfect fit for Craven Dunnill’s needs. There are limited organisations with the knowledge of both subjects. Years of research from university staff fed into the project and allowed us to address the problems which arose when combining the traditional hand craft process with digital technology.

How did the KTP meet the need (the activities / solution)?

By utilising the expertise offered from the University, new technology was brought in to improve lead times and open new areas of business, specifically in 3D scanning. The development budget provided opportunities for learning new skills which were applied to the project.

Outcome – Impacts & Benefits

What changed as a result of the KTP?

Craven Dunnill invested in a CNC milling machine and a 3D scanner, both of which were required to embed digital design into their traditional mould making process. Moulds, tiles and artworks can be 3D scanned and manipu- lated to produce new block moulds, the block can be directly plaster cast from, saving time and cost.

As well as being utilised for mould making, CAD now plays a role in the initial contact with customers. Vector drawings and 3D models are used to visualise end products, before we commit to producing physical models.

Layouts for wall and floor tile are designed within Rhinoceros3D. This allows for tiles to be automatically counted and layout issues to be resolved before committing resources to a project.

Broad benefits and impacts for all partners, (including economic, environ- mental and/or social perspective)

For CDJ:

Having the 3D capabilities in house has opened up the possibilities of additional revenue streams. Many projects can now be completed in house.

For UWE Bristol:

The Centre for Fine Print Research has a strategic objective and a long history of collab- orating with industry that constitutes around a third of its research.

The success of the KTP with Craven Dunnill Jackfield will add to the Centre’s reputation for combining traditional methods with modern digital technologies both in academia and commercially.

The project validates this research and highlights the value of this method.

The initial concept used was based on an Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB) project conducted in the early 2000’s and the development of these ideas into a successful industrial outcome is likely to generate further research questions for investigation.

It demonstrates how embedding digital technologies into traditional processes can generate benefits for both of the partners.

For the KTP associate

As the KTP associate, I am very pleased with how the project concluded. KTP has opened doors for me and given me the opportunity to develop as a project manager. I have attended multiple courses and conferences over the project, developing both my key skillset (CAD/3D Design) and other elements which will improve my efficiency at work such as Finance/ management/business.

Quantifiable benefits (the numbers bit!)

  • Improved product development time by 72% (From 2 weeks of model making, down to 4 days)
  • Reduced development costs on specific projects by up to 79% (Based on price of model board compared to traditional block and casing)

What the partners are saying?

“Through a challenging time for businesses, the KTP programme has been a true shining light, surpassing our expectations as a Company. It is critical for a 150yr old Company like ours to stay dynamic and explore ways in which new technologies can support and compliment traditional craftmanship. The KTP has brilliantly highlighted the way in which business and academia can come together to develop new capabilities and embed them into our operations. ”

Simon Howells, Managing Director, Craven Dunnill Group

“The Craven Dunnill Jackfield, CFPR/UWE KTP project shows that a committed Company and Academic team combined with an excellent, dedicated Associate can overcome the difficulties and adversities of operating during a pandemic to drive through to success. The project has been very successful and has exceeded the expectations of both partners.“

David Huson Senior Research Fellow, UWE Bristol

“The KTP program has been the most exciting part of my working life to date. It has given me the opportunity to develop my skills and interests within 3D design and technology, whilst allowing me the opportunity to put into practice the knowledge developed during my degree. “

Jed Leonard-Hammerman, 3D Technologies Specialist Craven Dunnill Jackfield

“This project could not have been done without the unusually wide skill set of the Associate who was equally at home in the application of complex digital technology and the practical traditional skills required to manufacture three dimensional tiles together with the support of his academic and company supervisors”

Russ Bromley Knowledge Transfer Adviser

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