UWE Bristol launches Skills Bootcamp in Achieving Zero Carbon Buildings to support employers in upskilling their workforce

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UWE Bristol is delivering a 12-week course starting on Friday 13 January 2023 designed to support employers from across the construction, engineering, and related industries to upskill their workforce to meet the current and future challenges of the climate change crisis through achieving zero carbon buildings.

Funded by the Department of Education, as part of the Government’s Lifetime Skills Guarantee, helping everyone gain skills for life’ our 12–week Skills Bootcamp will give learners the skills and knowledge of the role that modern methods of construction (MMC) and new digital technologies have in delivering zero carbon. With one-day per week of learning, learners will explore these challenges through diverse and hands-on learning activities, case studies and live discussions to develop fundamental knowledge and then enhance those skills to take back and embed into their organisations and own roles.

Why is this Skills Bootcamp beneficial to my organisation?

Employers in the construction industry require people ready to face the challenges of a changing sector that needs to rapidly modernise and decarbonise. Recently the Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government and the Construction Leadership Council have emphasised the use of industrialised manufacturing (MMC) and digital technologies as key to unlocking current competitiveness and sustainability issues in the industry.

As such, the industry is in urgent need of individuals:

  • with knowledge and awareness of MMC and the required integration of a complex supply chain working under just-in-time conditions.
  • that are digitally literate and capable of working with Building Information Modelling (BIM)
  • with knowledge and awareness of best sustainable practice, how to measure carbon footprints and how to implement effective carbon and energy reduction measures in new and retrofitted buildings.
  • able to collaborate and be part of a team.

By upskilling your workforce through our Skills Bootcamp in Achieving Zero Carbon Buildings, employers are committing to providing their employee with the opportunity of a new role or taking on additional responsibility in their current role, utilising the skills learnt. In return employers will benefit from an able and ready workforce to tackle future challenges in sustainable buildings and contribute to business and sector growth.

Across the 12 weeks learners will explore:

  • Session 1 – Introduction to Skills Bootcamp
  • Session 2 – Introduction to the Climate Change & the Net-Zero Carbon Building’s Challenge
  • Session 3 – Building Services & Zero Carbon
  • Session 4 – Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) for Zero Carbon (approaches and systems)
  • Session 5 – Site visit
  • Session 6 – Retrofitting for Zero Carbon
  • Session 7 – New Technologies for Zero Carbon (digital)
  • Session 8 – Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) for Zero Carbon (logistics and coordination)
  • Session 9 – Industry Symposium; Skills Development and Mentorship
  • Session 10 – New Technologies for Zero Carbon (MEP)
  • Session 11 – Learner presentations – How to Achieve Zero Carbon on Real Buildings?
  • Session 12 – Industry Symposium; Skills Development and Mentorship

Bootcamp fees

Skills Bootcamps are heavily funded for employers to access impactful training for their workforce to help to meet their industry’s current and future challenges. For this bootcamp, employers will be required to contribute the following fee per an employee:

  • SME organisation contribution (per employee)   £420
  • Large organisation contribution (per employee) £1,260

Eligibility

Skills Bootcamp learners must meet the following basic eligibility criteria:

  • Be aged 19 plus
  • Not currently in full-time or part-time education
  • Have the right to live and work in the UK
  • Live in England
  • Have not registered and attended (including partial completion) any other skills bootcamp in between April 2022-March 2023 from any provider.

Full information and registration.

Or contact the UWE Bristol Skills Bootcamps Team on: bootcamps@uwe.ac.uk or 0117 32 86303

The Centre for Machine Vision working on Detection for Early signs of Digital Dermatitis Lesions and Lameness Within Dairy Cattle

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UWE Bristol’s Centre for Machine Vision (CMV) are the academic partner on an innovative project with Hoofcount to detect early signs of digital dermatitis lesions and lameness within dairy cattle.

Hoofcount is a 10-year-old family business, focusing on how to keep cows’ hoofs clean and healthy. The project is aimed at using machine vision to develop an early detection lameness monitoring system. It has won funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), part of Defra’s Farming Innovation Programme, for feasibility studies combining innovation with research and collaboration with farmers and growers.

Hoof health is a prevalent issue in agriculture, particularly in the dairy industry, as it is one of the main factors leading to poor milk production. Dairy cows are susceptible to a range of hoof issues including Digital dermatitis, sole ulcers, white line disease and overgrown hooves. These generally show a visual change in the underside and back of the hoof. These issues can develop initially without the animal showing visual signs in its gait.

John Hardiman, Software Engineer at Hoofcount explained:

“Lameness is a key issue in dairy herds, with conservative estimates of 25% of dairy cattle suffering from lameness and each lame cow costing more than £300 in loss of production and treatment. The Hoofcount footbath is trusted and recommended by farmers vets and hoof trimmers internationally as they are seeing a continuous fall in lameness on farms using the Hoofcount Automatic Footbath.”

Detecting and treating these issues at an early stage is beneficial to the animal in keeping the hooves healthy and preventing severe lameness which leads to a lower production, increased veterinary and treatment costs, reduced animal welfare, a higher Carbon footprint, and many other issues.

Developing a system that can visualise these changes daily and detect any potential issues early will be of huge benefit to the national herd. Utilising computer vision and machine learning is Hoofcount’s preferred method for monitoring and detecting these issues.

“Collaboration with farmers is core to Hoofcount’s continued innovation and leading reputation in reliable foot-bathing for heard hoof health. Agri-EPI Centre has bolstered our collaboration, with the introduction of The Centre for Machine Vision (CMV) at UWE Bristol and successful application for Innovate UK funding (IUK). CMV has a track record of successful computer vision within agriculture. Agri-EPI has been instrumental in the project funding application and continues to support the project organisation with its network of research farms.”

“As with our automatic footbaths, we know that we will never get rid of Digital dermatitis and hoof health issues completely, however we want to do everything we can to minimise the effects of them and reduce the spread.”

Agri-EPI’s Head of Dairy, Duncan Forbes said:

“This is a great example of the sort of practical collaborations we seek to create, bringing together innovative companies like Hoofcount with leading research experts like the team at CMV at UWE Bristol. Early detection of lameness is vital to meeting the challenge of delivering a substantial reduction in lameness prevalence in dairy herds. UK milk producers will very much welcome the benefits to cow welfare and cost reduction that this emerging technical solution will deliver.”

Wenhao Zhang, Senior Lecturer in Machine Vision at UWE Bristol commented:

“Unique challenges arising from a realistic environment, such as a farm, are often underestimated when developing machine vision solutions to real-world problems. The large set of uncontrollable and dynamic variables in complex scenes cannot be tackled by simply applying tweaks to existing offerings.

Development of on-farm technology needs to be driven by fundamental research examining practical constraints in a bespoke way, in order to produce an innovative approach that is reliable, robust, and practicable. In this project, to solve the problem of object detection and classification ‘in the wild’, the opportunity to co-create this technology with different stakeholders and to informed design choices with the best farming practices and a wealth of inter-disciplinary knowledge is truly invaluable.”

The Centre for Machine Vision (CMV) is part of the Bristol Robotics Laboratory. They solve real-world practical computer vision problems. Their particular excellence lies in three-dimensional reconstruction and surface inspection.

Creative Industries spotlight: Gary Topp, Executive Director, Arnolfini

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Photo by Lawrence Bury, 2020.

Gary Topp joined Arnolfini in 2019 as Executive Director. He has led the team at Arnolfini through the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns and the many challenges and opportunities this created for Arnolfini and the wider sector. In the blog below he talks about his career, the importance of creative spaces and his future plans for Arnolfini.  

Gary has a broad and successful career in the creative industries. He started his career as a visual arts curator in museums, which quickly developed into the management and leadership space from his late twenties. His work with organisations that blend large scale project management with high level policy gave him a unique insight into the way that the public, private and third sectors interweave and the need to understand this cultural work within a broader social and economic framework.

Gary has been Director or Chief Executive of a range of cultural organisations over the past 20 years in both the UK and Australia and has worked with governments leading cultural strategies at both regional and city level.

“Throughout all of these roles I have remained passionately committed to the visual arts and to the vital role that cultural institutions like Arnolfini play in the life of cities. And I always admired Arnolfini’s long and influential track record. I still come to work each day as a fan and advocate for the part we play in the city, region and wider cultural sector and feel very lucky that my combined skillset was the right one for Arnolfini when I joined in 2019.”

With Gary’s exciting career, it’s unsurprising he has many highlights including delivering large scale events such as the Indian international Film awards in 2007 or Birmingham Commonwealth Games handover ceremony in 2018. He’s also secured and delivered millions of pounds worth of projects and investments with many wonderful partners in a range of cities and places. However, the chance to lead and implement change at Arnolfini is a real highlight.

“I am hugely proud to have been allowed the chance to lead Arnolfini and re-establish it at the forefront of cultural venues in the UK. Since joining in early 2019 I have had many moments launching exhibitions, hosting talks and events, establishing our UWE Bristol relationship, surviving COVID lockdowns, building community partnerships and working every week with a talented and committed group of colleagues and this all feels like a career highlight.”

Gary is a huge believer in spaces like Arnolfini and believes that creative spaces make a hugely important contribution to where we live in many practical, social and emotional ways.

“We can talk about our role in the visitor economy, or in the many ways that creativity is vital for entrepreneurism across many industry sectors; or we can reflect on our role as a community space for learning or welcoming new refugees to the city; or for the way that we animate and support city centres and nightlife.

Our audiences and communities often tell us how we act as a place of joy and inspiration with the ability to use the powerful impact of art and culture to promote new ways of experiencing the world. All great towns and cities have strong cultural centres at their heart and those that don’t generally wish that they did!”

“The creative industries have proved enormously resilient in the face of many challenges over the last 25 years (since the term first came into general usage) and this is a testament to the talent and determination that characterises the hundreds of thousands of people that work in them. But if we also understand that this talent can achieve more- socially as well as economically- we need to keep creating the environment and support systems to release even more talent.

To do this we need to unlock talent wherever it is in our communities and develop pathways of education, skills development, business change and massive amounts of cultural curiosity and creative capability everywhere. Universities like UWE Bristol, and cultural venues like Arnolfini, can create amazing alliances to unleash all of this latent capability!”

UWE Bristol have a strong partnership with Arnolfini, working together under the branding of ARNOLFINI x UWE. The purpose of the “x” signifies that Arnolfini’s work is amplified by partnering with UWE Bristol, who share similar cultural, education and research agendas.

“Developing and delivering this partnership has been a key driver of my leadership at Arnolfini and it manifests itself in lots of different ways through a rolling set of projects. Each year we host the degree shows in our galleries, stage dozens of joint events and activities for public and students alike and we continue to develop research partnerships and student placements. This means that whilst Arnolfini remains an independent charity we have a strong and important relationship with UWE Bristol that brings lots of mutual benefits.”

This is a very exiting time for Arnolfini. Under Gary’s guidance, they have successful got through the pandemic and are now anticipating over 700,000 visitors this year.

 “Like every organisation we try to improve each week and we will continue to focus on broadening our community impact whilst also developing our work internationally.  

Our daily work with our communities matched to the international reach of our exhibitions and cultural programme is a huge amount of work for a very dedicated small team.

Arnolfini is a strong cultural brand as well as a big building in Bristol and we look forward to working with our partners to develop and extend our project portfolio in many new and interesting ways. Our relationship with UWE Bristol will, of course, be front and centre in those plans.”

Thank you to Gary for this interview. Find out what is happening at the Arnolfini.

Black History Month 2022: Business Focus

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Getting the show on the road

Image: Julian Mensah founder of Voltric. Photo credit BSWN 2022

As part of Black History Month 2022, we are spotlighting individuals working around the following themes:

  • Skills
  • Innovation
  • Research
  • Business

This week we are focusing on Business:

UWE Alumni and Green Skills speaker Julian Mensah is Founder of Electric vehicle (EV) subscription service Voltric, whose aim is to remove barriers to reducing car emissions, making it more practical, cost effective and efficient to access green sustainable transport.

Along with Co-founder Brent Oldfield, another UWE Alumni, Voltric has gone from a concept and two Renault vehicle three years ago to expecting a total fleet of over 200 by the end of December, with plans to expand this to 1000 cars on the road next year, including models from Tesla, Mercedes, Renault and MG.

The idea for Voltric came from the creation of a business plan for Julian’s MA in Marketing at UWE in 2018, he wrote about electric cars and the business around supporting the transition from internal combustion engines to electric vehicles. Redundancy from a Product Management position encouraged him to revisit the business plan, which had never been far from his mind. Following a meeting with his Marketing Lecturer and an introduction to UWE’s Team Entrepreneurship he met business partner Brent, a student on the course.

He has been involved as an inspirational speaker from the outset on Green Skills for Jobs and Entrepreneurship, a transformational programme delivered by UWE in partnership with Black South West Network and NatWest. Aimed at increasing accessibility, knowledge and awareness of opportunities in the Green Sector. The sessions have been such a success that Voltric will be welcoming three fully paid Interns into their business under the Green Skills programme this year, giving them valuable experience in green technology. 

“If I can inspire and encourage Black and minoritised young people to think about the opportunities around tech and where that can take them, that’s not only something that benefits them individually, it ultimately benefits the whole community.”

“And I love that on Green Skills we’re talking not only about business, but about sustainability as a whole, how we can live in a sustainable manner.”

“If I was going to give any advice to myself before starting on my business journey, it would be to celebrate the small wins along the way. My life is so busy, being involved with Green Skills and connecting with the young Learners has been so enjoyable. It’s different from my every day and has helped me to reflect on all the successes we’ve had so far at Voltric and those to come in the future.”

voltric.co.uk

Future Textiles Conference 2023

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Image: Conference speakers.

Bristol and online, 28 February – 2 March 2023

The Centre for Print Research (CFPR) is excited to announce the Future Textiles Conference 2023, Bristol and Online, 28 February – 2 March 2023, focusing on Future Clothing for the Next Generation.

Textiles are so ubiquitous, yet their functions have not been changed much since the dawn of civilization. Additionally, textiles have received widespread attention as a versatile platform in recent years for future wearable electronics applications. However, they are still far from the requirements of modern-day electronics.

The global textile industry is also often cited as the second most polluting industry after oil, responsible for ~8-10% of global CO2 emission, ~20% water pollution and ~35% microplastic pollution.

Therefore, radically new approaches are needed at both materials and manufacturing level to transform textiles into highly innovative, sustainable, and intelligent clothing.

Sustainable clothing research from Smart wearable e-textiles research from Graphene Application Laboratory at CFPR

This conference will provide a forum for collaborative discussions to address such key challenges at both academic and industry level to develop future clothing for the next generation and facilitate the rapid transition of such textiles from lab to market.

The conference key themes are:

  • New Materials for Textiles
  • Wearable Electronic Textiles (E-textiles)
  • Digital Manufacturing (Industry 4.0)  
  • Sustainable Textile Manufacturing 
  • Circular Economy  
  • Smart Functional Textiles  
  • Protective Medical Clothing 
Smart wearable e-textiles research from Graphene Application Laboratory at CFPR

The conference will have varied speakers from across the industry. Keynote speakers include Professor Sir Konstantin Novoselov FRS from the National University of Singapore (NUS), who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2010 for isolating graphene at The University of Manchester in 2004.  He is an expert in condensed matter physics, mesoscopic physics, and nanotechnology. Every year since 2014, Kostya Novoselov has been included in the list of the most highly cited researchers in the world.

Other confirmed keynote speakers include Prof Stephen Russel and Prof Chris Carr from Leeds Institute for Textiles and Colour (LITAC), The university of Leeds, Prof Stephen Eichhorn from the University of Bristol, Prof Zijian Zheng from the Institute of Textile and Clothing at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Mr James Baker CEng FIET FRSA, CEO- Graphene@manchester, the University of Manchester, Professor Melik Demirel from Penn State University, USA, Anne Marr from University Arts London (UAL), and Dr Jun Chen from UCLA.

On behalf of the organising team, I am delighted to welcome you all to the first international conference on future textiles. The global textiles industry is currently facing a number of challenges in terms of materials, manufacturing and sustainability.  Addressing these challenges, the Future Textiles Conference will provide us opportunity for collaborative discussions to propose strategies for next generation clothing which is smart and sustainable. We very much look forward to hearing from you about your exciting research around new materials, digital manufacturing and sustainability for future textiles.” says Dr Nazmul Karim, Conference Chair and Associate Professor at CFPR, UWE Bristol.

The first Future Textiles Conference is one of the key outcomes of £7.7M of funding from Research England for Expanding Excellence in England awarded to the Centre for Print Research, which has enabled us to build a brand new Graphene Application Laboratory, attracting a  world-leading group of scientists to UWE Bristol including academics, fellows and PhD students, investigating novel applications and related technologies deriving from new materials, including graphene and other graphene-like, two-dimensional materials.

Dr Shaila Afroj, Co-organiser of the conference, says “This conference is going to be a fantastic opportunity to meet some of the great academics and industry experts who are leading the future textile industry, bringing all the exciting functionalities into your everyday clothing, yet care very much about the beautiful earth we live in. Eagerly looking forward to see all the great minds buzzing with new ideas, exploring new collaboration and getting excited to talk about all the new innovation. Hope to see you there …

More information on the Future Textiles Conference.

Black History Month 2022: Innovation focus

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As part of Black History Month 2022, we are spotlighting individuals working around the following themes:

  • Skills
  • Innovation
  • Research
  • Business

This week we are focusing on Innovation.

Mayowa Olanrewaju is a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) Associate for Harris Evolution Ltd. A KTP scheme is a UK-wide programme helping businesses to improve competitiveness and productivity. Businesses are provided with applied knowledge and technical expertise to help transform the business.

Based in Bristol, Harris Evolution is a commercial refurbishment company, specialising in quick turnaround projects carried out whilst the buildings are still in occupation. Harris’ work is targeted within three main sectors; Education, Healthcare and Hotel/Leisure.

The 24-month KTP project aims to implement transformational innovation through an Advanced Services approach to contract design and development of leadership capacity, which is led by Dr Kyle Alves , Dr Mel Smith and Professor Gareth Edwards. Through the collaboration with UWE Bristol, Harris will move from a standardised service offer to implementing outcome-based service contracts, tailored around individual customer value.

The aim of the project is to transform Harris Evolution LTD into adopting advanced services to the way contract is been set up. This entails getting to know what the customers exactly need and tailoring a service that best suits their needs.

Mayowa commented on the importance of innovation within the project:

“Innovation is so important because companies of the future will be defined by how quickly they can transform and digitalise their processes and respond to their customers’ demands. In a fast-paced supply chain where customers’ needs are constantly changing, organisations need to be ready to satisfy their customers fast. In our own case, I am looking at how we can leverage on Internet of Things(IoT) to understand the customer asset usage and how we can develop a value proposition

We have all seen the benefits of UBER, AIR BnB, 4G, 5G and so on using innovation to succed. Businesses need to be aware of emerging technology if they want to remain competitive. The organisations of the future will be fully digital and we all have to prepare for it. However, the government need to do more to help SMEs in their transformation journey so they can remain competitive”

Mayowa also talked about the benefits of a KTP:

“There has always been this disparity between academics and the business world as they both have unique ways of doing things so having the opportunity to bridge that gap in a partnership is a wonderful opportunity only KTP can give. The business world is now coming to terms with growth and development academics offer and if properly harnessed, businesses can see the benefits in their annual turnovers.”


Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs) are funded by UKRI through Innovate UK with the support of co-funders, including the Scottish Funding Council, Welsh Government, Invest Northern Ireland, Defra and BEIS. Innovate UK manages the KTP programme and facilitates its delivery through a range of partners including the Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN), Knowledge Bases and Businesses. Each partner plays a specific role in the support and delivery of the programme. 

UWE Bristol academic shortlisted for ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize

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Professor Sue Durbin’s mentoring scheme (‘alta’) for professional women across the aviation and aerospace industry has been announced as one of the finalists for this year’s ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize. The annual prize, now in its 10th year, recognises researchers who’ve achieved outstanding economic or societal impact from their work.

alta was launched in March 2019, through an industry-academic knowledge exchange project between the University of the West of England, Airbus, the Royal Air Force (RAF) Little Blue Private Jets Limited and the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS), the industry professional body. It was designed to address an industry-wide lack of mentoring provision for women, the under-representation of women in leadership roles and an industry skills shortage.

The on-line nature of the platform enables women to receive mentoring remotely, which was especially important during the Pandemic, during which time membership has increased by a quarter. The scheme has been acknowledged by an industry expert as ‘unique in being the only global women for women mentoring scheme in the industry.’

Sue commented:

“I am delighted to be a finalist for this prestigious ESRC impact prize, on behalf of the alta team and all women across the industry. The award recognises the many years of hard work and dedication by the team and more importantly, has meant that the many talented women across the industry are able to connect, support one another and build their careers in a supportive environment.”

The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony on 2 November 2022. The Celebrating Impact Prize ceremony will take place as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, which will be marking its 20th year.

Congratulations to Sue. View all the other finalists.

Centre for Print Research Artist Residencies

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Image: IMPACT12 opening procession from City Hall Bristol, led by resident artists the State of Print with the Sambistas band.  

UWE Bristol’s Centre for Print Research (CFPR) presents a truly exciting opportunity for collaboration and the enrichment of the CFPR’s research activities.

Artists and designers will make a body of work that contributes to the CFPR archive and the editions portfolio. They will bring a curiosity and range of interests in areas such as fine art, print, product design, robotics, electronics, software, manufacturing, and materials science, encouraging new and productive research partnerships. As well as producing a body of work, resident artists will deliver a range of inspiring talks and participative sessions to our researchers and student community. 

Carinna Parraman, Director of CFPR commented:

“We had an amazing summer of residencies coinciding with the IMPACT 12 multidisciplinary printmaking conference. Resident artists the State of Print, Rodrigo Arteaga and Tracy Hill delivered fantastic keynote presentations, and we were able to employ interns from UWE’s Fine Art and Illustration undergraduate courses to support the artists.

We were very excited to collaborate on resident artist exhibitions with our city partners: the School of Art and Design, Arnolfini and Spike Print Studio, and look forward to working together more as the programme progresses.”

The current artists in residencies include:

Rodrigo Arteaga

Rodrigo is a Chilean artist who completed a MFA in Sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art in 2018.  His practice is concerned with the complex relationship between nature, culture and representation. His interest in working across different areas of thought has led him to collaborate with specialists in fields such as Microbiology, Bio-Fabrication, Mycology, Natural History, Botany, and Architecture.

Rodrigo’s work at the exhibition Forest: Wake this Ground, Arnolfini, Bristol (2022)

State of Print

The State Of Print (SOP) is a proposition; it is an evolving visual declaration initiated by a collective of artists beguiled and amused at the catastrophe of current social and political thinking and the comedy of established systems of governance. The artists have therefore elected to cast adrift on a nonsense of their own (print)making—a makeshift non-geographical region built upon a fluid statute of ink and a constitutional raft of recycled cardboard. The intention has been to explore the current state of nations through the proposition that everything that formalises a nation state is printed – currency, maps, laws, passports, governance, news and information, cultures, doctrines and communications and so on.

Tracy Hill

Tracy Hill studied Fine Art at Bournville School of Art, Birmingham, Sheffield Hallam University and The University of Central Lancashire, Preston. She is the joint research lead of the Artlab Contemporary Print Studios at the University of Central Lancashire, which tests the relevance of printmaking in contemporary, mainstream art by innovation and expanding print practice through a process of continuing collaborative dialogues with artists. Her cross-disciplinary practice investigates and reconsiders the relationship between our developing digital capabilities and the aesthetics of the traditional hand created mark.

Tracy Hill Ephemeral Bodies Exhibition

Matt Smith

Matt explores how history is a constantly selected and refined narrative that presents itself as a fixed and accurate account of the past. Using techniques of institutional critique and artist intervention, his work investigates how museums can be reframed from an outsider, often LGBTQ, perspective by taking objects and repurposing them in new situations, or creating ‘lost objects’. Solo shows have included Queering the Museum (2010) at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Flux: Parian Unpacked (2018) at the Fitzwilliam Museum and Losing Venus (2020-2022) at the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford. In 2016 Matt was awarded an AHRC funded practice-based PhD from the University of Brighton exploring the intersection of contemporary art practice and queer identities. From 2017-2022 Matt was Professor of Craft at Konstfack University in Stockholm and in 2016 was artist-in-residence at the V&A where he explored how historic figurines could address questions of representation within the museum. His residency at the CFPR will build on this work.

View the full current artist residencies.

UWE Bristol research project receives award from Royal Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland

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The Royal Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland (RHASS) has recently awarded a Technical Innovation Award for technology developed by a consortium led by Soil Essentials Ltd, which included the UWE Centre for Machine Vision (CMV).

The awards recognise, showcase and reward the innovations and developments made by the manufacturers, distributers, providers and inventors of the agricultural sector.

Soil Essentials won a Silver award for their SKAi smart camera, which uses artificial intelligence to detect and target the spot spraying of individual weed species. The SKAi camera uses the cloud-based platform (KORE) to transform data, as well as working in conjunction with existing GPS and sprayer systems. It is claimed that the solution can vastly reduce agri-chemical usage up to 90%, increase efficiencies, and reduce costly inputs, alongside its environmental benefits.

“The detection and management of weeds in crops has long been a challenge” said Gregor Welsh of SoilEssentials. “The artificial intelligence we have developed with SKAi means that the detection and targeted spot spraying of individual weed species has now become a viable option”

Director of the Centre for Machine Vision, Professor Melvyn Smith commented: “CMV has been working with Soil Essentials since 2016 on computer vision and machine learning techniques for identifying weeds”. “It is highly rewarding to see this technology starting to have a real impact.”

Driving Innovation & Accelerating Growth: Focus on Smart Analytics, Digitisation and Robotics

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  • Wednesday 21 September
  • 16:00-18:00
  • Future Space, Frenchay Campus

Hosted by UWE Bristol’s Turing Network and the Research, Business and Innovation team, this event will focus on how Smart Analytics, Digitisation of Services, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Big Data and Robotics can transform your services and products.

Hear case studies applying cutting edge technology to real world problems and identify how this could be applied in your own business context, providing you with a competitive edge for the future.

The event will cover a taster of the following core themes:

  • Agri Tech
  • Fin Tech
  • Green Tech
  • Health Tech
  • Legal Tech

There will be a chance to hear from Innovate UK KTN and the UWE Bristol Turing Network on funding opportunities in the region and how to engage with the expertise from the wider University.

You will gain access to our innovation experts, connect with national funding bodies and other businesses, providing you with the knowledge to find solutions to the challenges you may be facing.

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