Introduction to our research strength focus: Creative Industries and Technologies

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At UWE Bristol we are proud of our active and collaborative research community of bold and innovative thinkers that are breaking research boundaries. 

Our four key research strengths are:   

  • Creative industries and technologies 
  • Digital Futures 
  • Health & Wellbeing 
  • Sustainability and Climate Change Resilience

Over the past three months we have been sharing content around our research strength, Health & Wellbeing. We are now moving onto our next focus: Creative Industries and Technologies

Creativity powers innovation, growth and human progress. Here at UWE Bristol we’re working with industry-leaders and with agile, leading-edge innovators to create new futures in everything from film and TV, animation and digital story-telling, games and virtual reality.

Our research strengths include:

  • creative industries and digital technologies
  • audiences of the future and immersive technologies
  • design, fabrication and print technologies.

To introduce this research strength, we are going to share with you two of our Creative industries and technologies research case studies: 

View all of our Creative Industries and Technologies case studies on our website.

Global boost for alternative film culture

Activists, artists, filmmakers and exhibitors have joined forces as part of the world’s largest alternative film network, building on the work of UWE Bristol academic Dr Steve Presence.

A scholar and activist in alternative film culture, Dr Presence co-founded the Radical Film Network (RFN) in 2013 in a bid to reinvigorate the innovative, politically engaged history of this sector. The network has since spread to 37 countries in four continents, including 207 affiliated organisations and 700 individual members.

Dr Presence, explored the organisational patterns, successes and failures of activist film culture dating back to the 1970s. This was matched by an analysis of the output of production companies, video-activist groups, film festivals, exhibition collectives, television series, commissioning departments and counter-cultural networks.

The most viable networks shared three commonalities – a strong identity, coherent internal organisation and widespread external relationships.

In creating something new, Dr Presence sought to establish a decentralised model, with network members taking charge of activities and decisions, whilst building a diverse stakeholder community to facilitate more opportunities for growth and collaboration.

Read the full case study.

Shifting perceptions of criminal justice

A scholar and activist in alternative film culture, Dr Presence co-founded the Radical Film Network (RFN) in 2013 in a bid to reinvigorate the innovative, politically engaged history of this sector. The network has since spread to 37 countries in four continents, including 207 affiliated organisations and 700 individual members.

Public engagement in the criminal justice system has been enhanced by our work, thanks to an innovative and digitised approach to capturing the history of the UK’s courthouses.

UWE Bristol’s Dr Rose Wallis is a renowned expert in historic criminal justice, exploring how the law influenced social relationships in the past, and their relevance to the present.

Dr Wallis’ work was central to the transformation of Dorchester’s Shire Hall Courthouse Museum – more than 17,000 people visited in its first year of opening in 2018, with the vast majority of those surveyed saying it made them rethink the role of law in their lives.

Dr Wallis helped to shape the narrative approach of the museum and researched much of the archival material that would eventually be used for its exhibition.

Working with museum professionals, creative media producers, and the Dorset History Centre, multi-media guides, interpretative digital displays and learning activities were developed with a core focus on historic stories of lived experience.

Read the full case study.

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