UWE Bristol launch Skills for Clean Growth programme for SMEs in the West of England

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The University of the West of England (UWE Bristol), in collaboration with NatWest and West of England Combined Authority (WECA), has announced its launch of the Skills for Clean Growth (SCG) programme in January 2022.

SCG is a free business support programme for SMEs in the West of England to help drive the region’s ambitions for clean and inclusive growth, as part of the Workforce for the Future programme.

The programme, funded by the European Social Fund (ESF), will provide the skills and workforce development needed to support businesses in their transition to a low carbon economy.

This includes access to a range of skills development, training and CPD – including the leadership skills needed to build a clean growth strategy; and the knowledge and tools to achieve sustainability.

Eligibility Criteria

To be eligible for support, applicants must have a business presence in the West of England (Bath & North East Somerset, Bristol, South Gloucestershire and North Somerset) and be a small or medium sized enterprise (SME) with less than 250 employees.

Registrations

The SCG programme is accepting registrations from SMEs now!

If you are interested in registering, please apply via the SCG website here where key information is outlined. Please select the ‘Apply now’ button where you will be asked to fill out some details about your company and the support you are looking for on a registration form.

A member of the UWE Bristol team will then be in touch with you to arrange an initial discussion around the programme and any of your needs. If you have any further queries in the meantime, please contact us via cleangrowth@uwe.ac.uk and one of the team will get back to you.

Workforce for the Future

UWE Bristol is delivering Workforce for the Future on behalf of the West of England Combined Authority (WECA) in collaboration with other partners.

Alongside the SCG programme, SMEs can access other support from expert partners. Please visit the West of England Combined Authority Growth Hub to find out more.

Come and work with us…

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We are looking for some exceptional people to come and join the team at UWE Bristol’s Research, Business and Innovation

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships

KTP is a great opportunity to fast-track your career. We currently have three vacancies, all are a 24 month fixed term contract, which includes management and business skills training provided by the national KTP programme and a further £2k per annum dedicated training budget tailored towards your personal development.

Specialist support from the academic team at UWE Bristol are provided and on completion of the KTP project it is the company’s intention to offer on-going employment to the right candidate.

Machine Learning and Imaging Integration Engineer (KTP Associate) based at B-hive Innovations Ltd in Lincolnshire

The Role: This role requires an awareness of AI and machine learning frameworks and an understanding of relevant imaging systems. The role of the KTP Associate will help determine DM content to improve utilisation of raw material through crop selection and enabling higher resale opportunities. This will include implementing advanced technical procedures and performing new experimental designs.

  • Closing date is 08/12/2021
  • Salary £35,000
  • Apply here

Skills Development

Skills Development Manager (Skills for Clean Growth) – Zero Carbon

An exciting opportunity has arisen to join the University’s Research Business and Innovation (RBI) Team, enabling the delivery of UWE Bristol’s new Skills for Clean Growth (Workforce for the Future) Programme.

Skills for Clean Growth is a new programme of support for businesses in the West of England, launching in September 2021. It is led by UWE Bristol, in partnership with NatWest and is funded by the West of England Combined Authority’s (WECA’s) Workforce for the Future fund.

  • Closing date: 09/01/2022
  • Salary: £34,304 to £40,927
  • Hours: Full time
  • Apply here

Bid Developement

Bid Development and Writer – Creative Digital Technologies


The Bid Developer and Writer for Creative and Digital Technologies will be responsible for advising and supporting University staff in the establishment, development and delivery of Research and Knowledge Exchange proposals, including research, consultancy, and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). They will have a specific focus on developing research in Creative Digital Technologies (e.g. 3-D printing, Creative Economies, VR, Screen Technologies, Digital Design, Electronic Textiles) by supporting the development of grant applications to relevant funders (including AHRC, EPSRC, Innovate UK).

  • Closing date: 09/12/2021
  • Salary: £34,304 – £40,927
  • Hours: Full time, fixed term, Maternity Cover.
  • Apply here

Faculty Executive Research

The Faculty Executive Research Support will be responsible for delivering a professional service through provision of specialist research environment advice, contributing to new procedures and policy development at a faculty level, and servicing both faculty and university-wide research committees. They will work closely with the Senior Research and Knowledge Exchange Managers to ensure that the support provided is appropriate and meets the needs of the individuals and Committees alike.

  • Closing date:
  • Salary: £30,497 – £34,304
  • Hours: Full time
  • Apply here

Research and Knowledge Exchange

The Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Managers will support development of research and knowledge exchange projects and processes for the University’s key thematic areas.  We are recruiting three posts, each with specialist expertise

Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Manager (HSS)

This role is focused on Health, including health technologies, mental health, biomedical, healthy communities, public health, health and social care (please refer to the UWE website to find a summary of all our research strengths in these areas).

The RKE Development Manager will be responsible for increasing external income through the identification, preparation, submission, and on occasion delivery, of significant funding proposals. They will work closely with UWE’s Research Centre Directors and Group Leaders to support them in achieving their strategic ambitions and objectives in relation to research and knowledge exchange, through the development, support and delivery of activities that foster the research environment needed to increase research and knowledge exchange income activity.

  • Salary: £40,927 – £44.706
  • Hours: Full time
  • Closing Date: 14/12/2021
  • Apply here

Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Manager (BSS)

This role is focused on Business and Social Sciences, including law, criminology, sociology, politics, economics, marketing, human resources, and operations management (please refer to the UWE website to find a summary of all our research strengths in these areas).  

The RKE Development Manager will be responsible for increasing external income through the identification, preparation, submission, and on occasion delivery, of significant funding proposals. They will work closely with UWE’s Research Centre Directors and Group Leaders to support them in achieving their strategic ambitions and objectives in relation to research and knowledge exchange, through the development, support and delivery of activities that foster the research environment needed to increase research and knowledge exchange income activity.

  • Salary: £40,927 – £44.706
  • Hours: Full time
  • Closing Date: 14/12/2021
  • Apply here

Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Manager (EE)

This role is focused on Environment and Engineering, including robotics, sustainable planning and environment, sustainable food production, smart manufacturing, air and water quality, and transport and society (please refer to the UWE website to find a summary of all our research strengths in these areas).

The RKE Development Manager will be responsible for increasing external income through the identification, preparation, submission, and on occasion delivery, of significant funding proposals. They will work closely with UWE’s Research Centre Directors and Group Leaders to support them in achieving their strategic ambitions and objectives in relation to research and knowledge exchange, through the development, support and delivery of activities that foster the research environment needed to increase research and knowledge exchange income activity.

  • Salary: £40,927 – £44.706
  • Hours: Full time
  • Closing Date: 14/12/2021
  • Apply here

Become an Industry Mentor and support our Skills Bootcamp learners

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Do you work within a digital skills role in areas such as data science, AI, cyber security, digital engineering, UX Design, games technology or sustainable development? Would you like to share your experience with our skills bootcamp learners? 

UWE Bristol are looking to work with a number of individuals to act as mentors across our skills bootcamps, supporting our learners as they develop their new skills and search for their next career opportunity.   

Register your interest to become a mentor

What is an industry mentor? 

Acting as a mentor you will support learners by providing guidance and share your experiences and knowledge from your area of expertise.
As part of your mentoring sessions, you will look to help your mentee(s) to:

  • Map their next steps in their chosen career path
  • Identify key skills needed for potential job opportunities 
  • Provide feedback on work they develop as part of their bootcamp portfolio 
  • Provide your perspective on your industry and give exposure to best practice 
  • Introduce them to your role or other suitable roles to understand the industry further  
  • Provide a networking experience to your mentee

Why become a mentor?

While you will be supporting our learners, acting as a mentor, you can also support your own personal development. Mentoring can be rewarding and provide you with insight from those looking to enter your industry and for you to learn from their experiences.

Our mentoring scheme will also give you the opportunity to:

  • Engage with our curriculum
  • Take part in a half day mentoring skills workshop to gain new transferrable skills
  • Receive a digital badge to showcase your experience in mentorship

Required skills/commitment

As a skills bootcamp mentor, you will:

  • Have 3+ years’ industry experience in one of the following areas:
    • Data Science & AI
    • Digital Engineering
    • User Experience &Design
    • Games Technology
    • Cyber Security
  • Be able to commit to meeting with your mentee(s) once a fortnight over a 2- 3-month period (this will usually be online)
  • Be willing to inspire, encourage and guide learners looking to start their career in your industry
  • Share your own experiences and examples with your mentee(s)

FAQ’s

I have less than 3 years industry experience, can I still become a mentor?

While we ask for 3 years industry experience, we would be happy to speak to anyone with less than this, that feels they would be able to contribute positively to the programme

Do I need to live in/near Bristol?

As sessions will run online you do not have to live in the Bristol area

Will I be paid for this?

Our mentoring positions are generally unpaid; however mentors will receive half day training workshop to develop their mentoring skills and a digital badge at the end of their involvement.

Register your interest to become a mentor

Research Centre Spotlight: Centre for Research in Biosciences (CRIB)

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Centre for Research in Biosciences (CRIB) conducts research within the Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, with over 60 academics, 20-40 PhD students at any one time. CRIB has a thriving research community with extensive collaborations across UWE and with national and international partners. We have a vibrant virtual research seminar programme with speakers from all over the world.

CRIB has the following five broad research themes:

  1. Bioscience for Health
  2. Biosensing, Forensic and Analytical Sciences
  3. Bioscience for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Water
  4. Environmental, Ecological and Conservation Sciences
  5. Interdisciplinary and education research

The following exciting projects showcase our work related to Sustainability and Climate Change.

CASE 1: SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRODUCTION

Our food systems are currently experiencing multiple threats and require new research and innovation to achieve biodiversity and net zero targets, as well as health and wellbeing and accessibility for all. Below are some examples of the exciting research and innovation taking place in CRIB to improve sustainable and healthy diets, reduce food waste and improve farmers’ livelihoods in the UK and internationally.

1.1 Making healthy and sustainable food accessible for all (Angelina Sanderson Bellamy)

Data collected during the UKRI-funded TGRAINS project has demonstrated the role that community-supported agriculture (CSA) vegetable box schemes have in improving both the health and sustainability of household diets. ‘CSA diets’, compared to control group diets, are higher in vegetables and legumes and lower in meats, sugar and saturated fats, with 28% lower CO2 emissions.

Our results also confirm previous results that show CSA households tend to have higher income than the UK national average, with higher socio-economic class. This shows that some in British society are willing and able to make dietary changes that are necessary to improve health, environmental outcomes, and reach the UK’s 2050 carbon emission targets, but that income and socio-economic status are a barrier to participation. 

This leads us to ask if similar outcomes can be achieved with food insecure households? What additional barriers do food insecure households face and how can we make fresh, locally grown vegetables accessible to everyone? We are also working with farm partners to test solidarity models, so that they can make vegetables available to all, regardless of income. We seek to generate impact by exploring whether food insecure households make dietary changes after joining a CSA and enabling a broader demographic to access the benefits of a ‘CSA diet’, thereby improving environmental and health impacts. 

The TGRAINS Accessible Veg project recently hosted visits from Jane Hutt, the Welsh minister of Social Justice, and Lesly Griffiths, the Welsh Minister of Rural Affairs and Environment regarding evidence related to achieving sustainable diets.

Dr Sanderson Bellamy was interviewed on Farming Today on BBC Radio 4

  1. 2 Reducing deforestation and improving livelihoods for Cacao producers in Africa (Joel Allainguillaume, Andy Wetten, Jackie Barnett, Richard Luxton)

Deforestation is a major issue in West Africa with a significant portion due to cocoa farming. To exacerbate the situation, the Cacao Swollen Shoot Virus (CSSV) threatens the livelihoods of cocoa farmers with up to 15% reduction in production leading to further deforestation as new areas for plantations are required. At UWE, we have been studying CSSV to help resolve its impact in West Africa, which produces nearly two-thirds of the world’s supply of cocoa.

Some of the most exciting research we have produced is the development of a biosensor that detects CSSV before any symptoms appear in affected plants1. In parallel with this work, we are also developing a traceability strategy for cacao products which will help strengthen supply chain mapping and prevent the sale of cacao grown illegally in protected forest areas2.

This work has been conducted in collaboration with a range of external partners and collaborators from European governmental institutes (CIRAD) and West African institutes (Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana, ICRAF) with internal partners from the Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology, with funding provided by the UK government (Innovate UK) and the cocoa industry (Mars Wrigley, European Cocoa Association (ECA), Cocoa Research UK).

1: https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/7440964;

2: https://doi.org/10.1108/SCM-11-2020-0583

Photo: (a) Cocoa is one of the most valuable sources of income for smallholder farmers in West Africa.

Photo: b) The most damaging viral disease affecting the West African cacao crop is spread by mealybug scale insects.

  1. 3 Improving public health by reducing foodborne diseases and improving the sustainability of the food supply chain (Alexandros Stratakos)

The increasing global demand for food poses a serious challenge for humankind. International food trade is one of the most significant factors driving increases in foodborne diseases. Therefore, we urgently need to improve the safety and sustainability of food supply chains. Our research aims to develop cold plasma-based systems and strategies, which are able to rapidly and effectively eliminate risks to human health that can enter the food chain at any stage from the farm to its preparation for consumption.

Plasma is considered the 4th state of matter, with examples including the northern lights, lightening and solar winds. In the lab, we produce cold plasma by excitation of gas molecules using electrical discharges. Cold plasma is an environmentally friendly technology and our research shows that cold plasma eliminates pathogens on meat, vegetables, food contact surfaces and even skin. The use of cold plasma for decontamination of food processing, manufacturing and preparation areas can remove important microbiological and chemical contaminants, which will increase the shelf life of food, thereby reducing food waste, as well as improve safety. This can improve public health by reducing foodborne diseases and improving the sustainability of the food supply chain. 

Our growing research team works together with academic and industrial collaborators in the UK (e.g. Queen’s University Belfast, University of Central Lancashire, Ulster University) and internationally (e.g. Ireland, Germany, Greece, Spain) to translate this our research to real life applications that benefit industry, public bodies, authorities and consumers.

Photo: Cold atmospheric plasma treatment of food (UWE lab)

1.4 Using volatile sensing to reduce food waste in the supply chain (Barbara dos Santos Correia, Darren Reynolds and Robin Thorn)

Food waste is a huge global issue with serious implications for climate change – a third of all global food production is never consumed, contributing 8-10% of total man-made greenhouse gas emissions. The potato is the leading non-grain commodity in the global food system, but also the number one wasted food in UK households (WRAP).

To reduce waste, industry needs to embrace smarter and more sustainable production methods. The Future Leaders Fellowship “TuberSense – Early detection of potato diseases through volatile sensing to reduce food waste in the supply chain”, awarded and funded by UKRI to Dr Barbara dos Santos Correia and B-hive Innovations Ltd, aims to identify disruptive diseases and defects that affect potato production and storage across the UK and create innovative tools based on volatile sensing to prevent agri-food waste.

The Fellowship is further supported by Prof James A. Covington at the University of Warwick, Dr Robert Hancock (James Hutton Institute) and Dr David Nelson (Branston Ltd).


Photo: Volatile sensors (top of image) will be developed that detect the disease state of potatoes in the field, in the store and/or packaged for sale.

CASE 2: WATER AND MICROPLASTIC

2.1 Clean water for all (Darren Reynolds, Robin Thorn, Gillian Clayton, Bethany Fox )

Globally, almost 2 billion people do not have access to safely managed drinking water, and almost 1 million people per year die as a result of preventable diarrhoeal diseases contracted from the consumption of biologically contaminated waters (WHO & UNICEF, 2021).

For the past 10 years, UWE has designed, tested, developed and produced a community scale drinking water treatment platform in collaboration with Portsmouth Aviation. The system utilises electrochemically generated hypochlorous acid which has enhanced antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity, compared to commonly used sodium hypochlorite (Clayton, Thorn and Reynolds, 2021). The system has been continuously running on UWE’s Frenchay Campus since November 2019 and has produced over 3 million litres of UK standard drinking water.


Photo: Clean water for all; the community scale drinking water treatment platform is currently undergoing ongoing field trials at UWE Bristol.

Clayton, G.E., Thorn, R.M.S. and Reynolds, D.M. (2021) The efficacy of chlorine-based disinfectants against planktonic and biofilm bacteria for decentralised point-of-use drinking water. npj Clean Water. 4  (1), . doi:10.1038/s41545-021-00139-w.

WHO & UNICEF (2021) Progress on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in households 2000-2020: Five years into the SDGs.

2.2 Unearthing the water crisis in the River Ganges (Bethany Fox, Darren Reynolds, Robin Thorn)

Since 2018, UWE Bristol has led an Indo-UK Water Quality project, Water Quality – TEST, involving many project partners including NGOs, industry and academic institutes in both the UK and India.

At its core this project has focused on the development and deployment of technologies for monitoring biological water quality and the provision of biologically-safe drinking water.  With other UK-India water quality projects, a large collaborative study was undertaken to monitor water pollution along >2,500 km of the Ganges River and its major tributaries.

This study was carried out over a three-week period in November 2019 by three teams of more than 30 international researchers from 10 institutions. Alongside the 80+ water quality parameters assessed at 81 locations along the river, microplastics in the water and river sediments were also assessed. This microplastics research was presented in the Green Zone at COP26 on the COP-Universities and UKRI stands.

Photo: The reality of the water crisis in the Gangetic basin; flushing of a street side-drain into the River Ganges, carrying plastic bottles and other waste directly into the river.
Picture taken November 2019.

2.3 Airborne microplastics: an unquantified risk (Stephanie Sargeant, Darren Reynolds)

Researchers at UWE Bristol have been investigating the potential health implications of airborne microplastics since 2018. Although significant work has been done to understand the presence of microplastics in the environment, much of this work has focused on the marine environment, which is now well established. However, there is a significant knowledge gap around airborne microplastics and their potential health implications remain largely unknown.

Initial work started with developing methods to recover, identify and characterise microplastic particles from routine air quality monitoring stations. This analysis technique allowed researchers to successfully sample airborne particles less than 10µm in size, characterise the polymer types and has the potential to be applied to other routine air quality monitoring filters.

Photo A: Air quality β-attenuation monitoring [BAM] filters. B: Sample of fishing rope. C: Single fibre of fishing rope under the Micro-RAMAN.

Following this work, researchers in the Biospheric Microplastics Research Cluster (BMRC), at UWE Bristol, are working to address critical gaps in the microplastic research landscape, notably the association between environmental exposure to microplastics through source, pathway, receptor relationships, and their potential to cause harm.

The BMRC brings together expertise from multiple disciplines across UWE Bristol, all of which play a crucial role in understanding the impact of microplastics on human and ecosystem health, expanding research excellence and enhancing teaching across the university landscape. Through understanding the human and ecosystem health implications of plastics, we believe there is an opportunity to contribute to their redesign, reuse and replacement throughout society.

CASE 3: CONSERVATION

3.1 Landscape level approaches to the conservation of bats in the UK (Emma Stone and Paul Lintott)

Dr Emma Stone and Dr Paul Lintott lead the very active Bat Conservation Research Lab in CRIB and work with a range of stakeholders to produce evidence based solutions for conservation management of bats. Bats (Chiroptera) make an important contribution to our biodiversity, accounting for one third of all UK mammals, and perform important ecosystem services such as insect pest control, pollination and seed dispersal.

Bats are reliant on healthy diverse habitats to survive, and historic declines mean that bats and their roosts are now legally protected in the UK. Urbanisation and development are one of the biggest threats to bats and their habitats and have detrimental impacts on bats through habitat loss, anthropogenic noise and artificial illumination. We are working in close collaboration with a range of partners across South West England to understand the impacts of such drivers on bats and provide evidence based conservation strategies to mitigate impacts and improve legislation.

Map of mean nightly bat activity recorded at acoustic study sites in North Somerset in 2020

With North Somerset Council and Natural England we are conducting applied research which aims to improve regulatory frameworks to deliver better conservation outcomes for bats. We are using an integrated approach combining acoustic surveys, GPS and radio-tracking of bats, ecological niche and landscape connectivity modelling to identify environmental factors that limit the distribution of threatened bat species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, and R. ferrumequinum). We create cutting edge landscape network maps from aerial photographs and synthetic aperture radar imagery which allow us to predict the impacts of development on bats at a county scale.

We run a country wide citizen science project “North Somerset Bat Survey” which collects long term bat acoustic and distribution data through public engagement. These data are then shared with North Somerset Council and used in the mapping processes to inform planning decisions at a county level.

Volunteers sign up to take part on our website where they book an ultrasonic bat detector and place it in nearby habitat to record bat calls for six nights. Volunteers upload bat acoustic data to the online British Trust for Ornithology Pipeline which uses a cutting-edge algorithm to automatically identify the bat species present. Between Sept and Oct 2021 we surveyed 83 1km squares and 26,508 identified recordings of which 10,391 were bat recordings comprising 14 species.

Experimental lighting study showing LED lights installed along a river in North Somerset to test impacts on riparian bats.

Our recent work involves conducting field experiments to understand the impacts of artificial lighting on bats along waterways. By installing temporary streetlights in a controlled experiment we were able to show that all night LED lights reduce the ability of bats to forage along rivers, which can have significant effects on bat populations, especially those that rely on aquatic insects along waterways for feeding. Future work will build on our findings to develop strategies to mitigate impacts of lighting and developments on bats. Watch this space!

3.2 Conservation of gorillas in Equatorial Guinea (David Fernández)

Since 2018, Dr David Fernández has worked with Dr Gráinne McCabe, from the Bristol Zoological Society (BZS), and with researchers from the Equatoguinean Institute for Forestry Development, to run a joint conservation programme focused on the Critically Endangered Western Lowland Gorilla and other large mammals in Monte Alén National Park, Equatorial Guinea.

Although Monte Alén has been identified as a priority area for wildlife conservation in Central Africa, hunting, income inequality and limited institutional capacity threaten the protection of this unique ecosystem.

Since its inception, the project has raised over $117,000 from National Geographic, the Arcus Foundation, and the Elephant Crisis Fund.

In 2020, we deployed an array of camera-traps and acoustic sensors for the long-term monitoring of large mammals and hunting in the Park. While this work was disrupted due to COVID-19, we have already found evidence that despite hunting being widespread, the gorillas remain in the area and the population is still reproducing, and are currently analysing acoustic data to quantify hunting and determine spatio-temporal factors affecting this activity. We are also working with local communities to mitigate crop-foraging, which threatens human-wildlife co-existence and has led to at least 19 retaliatory killings of Critically Endangered forest elephants since 2019. As such, in January 2022 we will initiate a study to test the efficacy of different humane strategies to mitigate elephant crop-foraging and hence reduce farmers’ economic and crop losses.

Recently the programme team has expanded with the addition of Drs Aimee Oxley and Edward Wright (BZS), and Mr Juan Cruz Ondo Nze Avomo, Field Manager. Over the next five years, we plan to expand our work to understand the socioeconomic drivers of natural resource use, implement alternative livelihood projects with local communities, and continue developing national capacity for biodiversity monitoring and evidence-based wildlife conservation.

3.3 Developing environmental DNA (eDNA) technologies (Mark Steer, Stephanie Sargeant, Angeliki Savvantoglou, Buffy Smith)

Photo: What lies beneath? eDNA can help to uncover the secrets of life underwater by identifying the DNA left behind by animals living in rivers, lakes and sea.

The eDNA partnership at UWE works with a range of partners to develop environmental DNA survey techniques which extract and identify the DNA left behind by animals in their environment. Our projects have encompassed creating methods to survey both the European Eel and the invasive parasite which may be an important factor in the eels’ dramatic population declines (partnership with Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust). Our aquatic work now extends to collaborations with Bristol Zoological Gardens, the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research and Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation, carrying out surveys for critically endangered fish and bivalves in the Mediterranean Basin. We are also at the early stages of a collaboration to create an eDNA method to search for Europe’s rarest fish, the Asprete, in the mountain streams of Romania.

Environmental DNA, however, is not solely recovered from water. Pioneering work carried out by PhD students Angeliki Savvantoglou and Buffy Smith has shown that mammal DNA can be recovered from the intestinal tracts of dung flies.

We have successfully demonstrated the use of the method to map the occurrence of bears in Greece and assess the impact of habitat fragmentation on lemurs in Madagascar, work which will help to inform habitat protection and restoration plans in both countries. This work is carried out in collaboration with in-country partners Callisto and Sadabe.

Our latest venture is really exciting – extracting DNA directly from the air, a project we’re carrying out with in partnership with the WrEN project. It’s a little early to report on our results, but the initial findings are promising.

The development of these survey techniques provides a highly sensitive and non-invasive method which will allow us to carry out species surveys rapidly and accurately, which is especially useful for species which are hard to spot or identify in the field. eDNA provides a powerful complementary technique for assessing the distribution of species across many different habitats.

3.4 Assessing the involvement and risk of bacteria to oak and other broadleaf tree hosts (Carrie Brady)

Dr Brady is a bacterial taxonomist in CRIB, working in collaboration with Forest Research on a multimillion pound BBSRC-funded grant to limit the spread of pathogenic bacteria that are damaging and causing the death of many native British oak trees. Native oak species are currently under threat from Acute Oak Decline (AOD), a serious disease affecting mature trees that has spread throughout the south east and midlands of Britain. A polymicrobial complex has been identified as the cause of the bleeding lesions typical of the decline with two bacterial species, Brenneria goodwinii and Gibbsiella quercinecans, responsible for the necrosis of the inner bark. We isolated, identified and classified these two new bacterial species just over a decade ago. The research into AOD at UWE centres around the classification, identification and detection of bacteria associated with the decline.

Photo: Mature Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) displaying symptoms of acute oak decline with several bleeds visible on the trunk.

Since joining UWE Bristol in 2011, we have described two novel genera and 11 novel species of bacteria isolated from oak displaying symptoms of AOD. We also develop molecular screening methods to detect the most commonly isolated bacteria from diseased tissue, examine possible synergistic relationships between the bacteria and try to determine routes of infection from possible reservoirs such as rhizosphere soil.

Our research has recently expanded into screening bleeding cankers of other broadleaf hosts such as lime, beech, elm and birch to determine if the AOD bacteria are present on hosts other than oak. Preliminary results from field trips in Gloucestershire and Wiltshire indicate a novel Brenneria species may be involved in necrosis of lime with symptoms of bleeding cankers along with the AOD-associated bacteria. This opens several exciting avenues of future research with the possibility of another polymicrobial disease on a broadleaf host, similar to the complex responsible for AOD.

Photo: Bleeding symptoms on mature Tilia x europaea (common lime).
Photo: Removing bleeding outer bark using chisel and mallet.

Photo: Necrotic lesion on inner bark beneath bleeding outer bark of Tilia hybrid.

CASE 4: CARBON CAPTURE VIA REWILDING

4.1 Carbon capture via rewilding (Pete Maxfield; Sam Bonnett; Adrian Crew; Mark Steer)

Landscape-scale ecosystem restoration, or ‘Rewilding’, is being deployed globally to enhance biodiversity and contribute to climate change mitigation by increasing carbon storage and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Soils play a key role in long-term global carbon storage with twice as much carbon stored in soil compared to the atmosphere and three times more compared to vegetation. There is considerable commercial interest in the development of carbon credit schemes which allow individuals and companies to invest in projects around the world in order to balance carbon footprints, but these need rigorous monitoring to ensure that they deliver the expected benefits. Researchers in CRIB are leading the development of methods for evaluation and validation of carbon storage in rewilded ecosystems.

A key barrier to implementing programmes to increase soil organic carbon (SOC) at large scale is that SOC cannot be easily measured and monitored over the short-term. Current valuation and validation standards for rewilding and/or carbon offsetting projects are dependent on estimated values that may or may not be validated for specific ecosystems and so there is a requirement for empirical evaluation of the spatial and temporal variation of soil carbon and GHG flux within rewilded ecosystems for future method developments. This is particularly important for small and mid-sized rewilding projects (< 500 acres) which make up the majority of rewilding projects in England but receive very little academic interest.

Photo: Measuring greenhouse gas emissions in real time at Honeygar

We are using state of the art in-field and laboratory techniques to measure the impact of ecosystem restoration on soil carbon dynamics at a number of important rewilding sites including Honeygar, the Somerset Wildlife Trust’s £3m peatland restoration initiative in the internationally important Somerset Levels and Moors landscape, and the community-led rewilding project, Wild Woodbury, which extends 170 hectares across the south Dorset landscape.

We are also working with the Wild Carbon Fund to develop an over-arching framework for monitoring carbon storage and sequestration on rewilding sites which will provide landowners with a robust carbon monitoring framework.

Our work in Somerset is supporting the government’s Lowland Peatland Taskforce in developing its long-term strategic goals for managing carbon stocks in the UK’s lowland peatlands.

Image: Engaging with local communities with vitally important to develop understanding for how changing the land use in agricultural systems can provide both environmental and economic benefits.

Come and work with us…

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We are looking for some exceptional people to come and join the team at UWE Bristol’s Research, Business and Innovation

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships

KTP is a great opportunity to fast-track your career. We currently have three vacancies, all are a 24 month fixed term contract, which includes management and business skills training provided by the national KTP programme and a further £2k per annum dedicated training budget tailored towards your personal development.

Specialist support from the academic team at UWE Bristol are provided and on completion of the KTP project it is the company’s intention to offer on-going employment to the right candidate.

Machine Learning and Imaging Integration Engineer (KTP Associate) based at B-hive Innovations Ltd in Lincolnshire

The Role: This role requires an awareness of AI and machine learning frameworks and an understanding of relevant imaging systems. The role of the KTP Associate will help determine DM content to improve utilisation of raw material through crop selection and enabling higher resale opportunities. This will include implementing advanced technical procedures and performing new experimental designs.

  • Closing date is 08/12/2021
  • Salary £35,000
  • Apply here

Business Change Analyst (KTP Associate) based Lynne Fernandes Limited in Bristol

The Role: Do you have an awareness of marketing practices and an understanding of implementing new organisational processes and practices? Then this is a fantastic opportunity to work in a collaborative partnership between the University of the West of England (UWE) Bristol and Lynne Fernandes Limited under the UK Government sponsored Management Knowledge Transfer Partnership (MKTP) programme.

During the 24-month project you will develop and embed the necessary management capabilities and leadership skills required to grow the company in line with its strategic ambitions, and increase its effectiveness and productivity in a scalable way.

  • Closing date 30/11/2021
  • Salary £30,000
  • Apply here

Research and Knowledge Exchange

The Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Managers will support development of research and knowledge exchange projects and processes for the University’s key thematic areas.  We are recruiting three posts, each with specialist expertise

Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Manager (HSS)

This role is focused on Health, including health technologies, mental health, biomedical, healthy communities, public health, health and social care (please refer to the UWE website to find a summary of all our research strengths in these areas).

The RKE Development Manager will be responsible for increasing external income through the identification, preparation, submission, and on occasion delivery, of significant funding proposals. They will work closely with UWE’s Research Centre Directors and Group Leaders to support them in achieving their strategic ambitions and objectives in relation to research and knowledge exchange, through the development, support and delivery of activities that foster the research environment needed to increase research and knowledge exchange income activity.

  • Salary: £40,927 – £44.706
  • Hours: Full time
  • Closing Date: 14/12/2021
  • Apply here

Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Manager (BSS)

This role is focused on Business and Social Sciences, including law, criminology, sociology, politics, economics, marketing, human resources, and operations management (please refer to the UWE website to find a summary of all our research strengths in these areas).  

The RKE Development Manager will be responsible for increasing external income through the identification, preparation, submission, and on occasion delivery, of significant funding proposals. They will work closely with UWE’s Research Centre Directors and Group Leaders to support them in achieving their strategic ambitions and objectives in relation to research and knowledge exchange, through the development, support and delivery of activities that foster the research environment needed to increase research and knowledge exchange income activity.

  • Salary: £40,927 – £44.706
  • Hours: Full time
  • Closing Date: 14/12/2021
  • Apply here

Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) Development Manager (EE)

This role is focused on Environment and Engineering, including robotics, sustainable planning and environment, sustainable food production, smart manufacturing, air and water quality, and transport and society (please refer to the UWE website to find a summary of all our research strengths in these areas).

The RKE Development Manager will be responsible for increasing external income through the identification, preparation, submission, and on occasion delivery, of significant funding proposals. They will work closely with UWE’s Research Centre Directors and Group Leaders to support them in achieving their strategic ambitions and objectives in relation to research and knowledge exchange, through the development, support and delivery of activities that foster the research environment needed to increase research and knowledge exchange income activity.

  • Salary: £40,927 – £44.706
  • Hours: Full time
  • Closing Date: 14/12/2021
  • Apply here

UWE Bristol Academic Spotlight: Professor Glenn Lyons

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Professor Lyons is the Mott MacDonald Professor of Future Mobility at UWE Bristol. He is partly seconded to Mott MacDonald and in turn involved in working with public sector transport clients across the world on addressing strategic transport planning in the face of social and technological change, uncertainty and a climate emergency.

In his role he led the development of FUTURES – Future Uncertainty Toolkit for Understanding and Responding to an Evolving Society. This is a vision-led six-stage approach to strategic planning for an uncertain world and is being applied increasingly in the transport sector while also being considered in other sectors such as water. This work demonstrates how he is able to translate academic insight into practically applied know-how.

“We must concern ourselves not only with the future of mobility but with the future of planning for the future of mobility. There is growing recognition internationally of the need for an evolution in how we address planning and investment for the future. FUTURES represents a key part of this evolution and a means to make decision making more resilient”.

Professor Glenn Lyons

Most recently he has also led a major piece of work for the UK Department for Transport in support of its Transport Decarbonisation Plan which involved developing a series of seven technology roadmaps for the reduction and removal of direct emissions from all modes of domestic transport by 2050.

Read the final report Decarbonising UK Transport

Formerly Professor of Transport and Society at UWE Bristol, Glenn is the Founder of the Centre for Transport & Society and was its first Director.

Professor Lyons’ research interests are:

● Strategic transport planning
● Transport, society and lifestyles
● Handling uncertainty
● Digital age implications for transport and travel
● Traveller information and Mobility-as-a-Service
● Travel behaviour
● Future mobility and accessibility
● Decarbonising transport

For further information about Professor Lyons click here

UWE Bristol researchers seeking dairy farmer input in developing a new way to fight bovine mastitis

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UWE Bristol academic Alexandros Stratakos is currently seeking dairy farms to work with to develop a new way to fight bovine mastitis.

This project is part of an ongoing collaboration between the UWE Bristol (Dr Alexandros Stratakos) and University of Bristol (Dr Daniel Enriquez-Hidalgo, Professor John Tarlton):

Bovine mastitis is the leading infectious disease of dairy cattle and remains a major challenge to the UK dairy industry. It is the most costly disease for the industry, and affects the welfare of your animals.

Normally treated with expensive antibiotics that can leave residues in milk and lead to antimicrobial resistance, researchers are developing a new preventative method based on cold plasma.

Cold plasma is produced at a very low cost by applying electricity to a gas. This technology is non-invasive, quick, antibiotic, residue and pain free, environmentally friendly and can be applied directly to the cow’s teat.

We believe that this technology can offer significant benefits and we are interested in finding dairy farmers who can help us identify what they need to make this technology work for them. The project will explore: i) the efficacy against microorganisms causing mastitis and ii) the safety of the method on bovine mammary skin and iii) wound healing acceleration.

If you are a dairy farmer interested in helping develop this technology further, please contact one of the team members to arrange a short visit to your farm.

Contact details:

UWE Bristol’s guide to COP26

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An introduction from Abbie Basketter, UWE Bristol’s Carbon Action Manager

UWE Bristol and The Students’ Union at UWE have many staff who can provide information about our whole institution approach to sustainability. Abbie Basketter is UWE’s Carbon Action Manager and she provides information and advice on reducing carbon emissions at UWE, including specific Faculty and Professional Services data and targets, climate action cafes and other engagement events. Also recently she has been providing advice sessions and events for staff around COP26.

What is COP?

Conference of the Parties

Essentially, the countries and groups that are part of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change which was formed in 1994. They meet annually to talk about climate change and make decisions on international action to tackle this.

Why is it 26?

There have been 25 annual conferences prior to this one so its number 26 and it’s being held in Glasgow.

What happened at the previous COPs?

There are two previous COPs which are particularly significant:

  • COP3, Kyoto, 1997. Resulted in the Kyoto Protocol. The protocol set out international agreement for the first time on measuring emissions and putting targets in place to limit these.
  • COP21, Paris, 2015. Resulted in the Paris Agreement. This was the first time the international community agreed on the need for a limit to global warming. 1.5oC was agreed as the upper limit of what could be managed safely and reductions would need to be met by 2050. More targets for emissions reductions were signed up to at this meeting.

Are COP agreements effective?

A hard question to give a definitive answer to. There are some things about COPs which can be frustrating. They are lengthy negotiations and in order to make the commitments legally binding a certain proportion of countries need to adopt the targets and translate them into national law. For COP3 (Kyoto Protocol) this took eight years, only becoming ratified in 2005. For COP21 the process was much faster with ratification taking place the following year in 2016.

However, there are other elements which have been effective at pushing environmental action forwards. The requirement to measure emissions from the Kyoto Protocol prompted the EU to adopt this as a legal requirement for all member states and the European Emissions Trading Scheme was a direct result of this international agreement.

The increased profile of recent COPs, with COP26 possibly being the most widely reported to date, means that there is greater focus and pressure on nations to both attend and make commitments. Even so, it remains to be seen if COP26 will deliver what’s needed.

Why is COP26 so important?

It’s five years since the targets were set in the Paris Agreement and this is now the time that new targets are due to be set. These need to be in line with limiting global warming to within 1.5oC as this was not the case with the previous targets so it’s a critical moment to get these right. (You can see how countries are doing right now with the commitments they have in place already with this map of climate change targets.)

It’s widely acknowledged that this decade is key for making significant progress on climate change. This means the underlying support for change will also need to be in place – investment for new technologies and infrastructure, cooperation between countries and support for those most affected by climate change. After 12th November we’ll hopefully have commitments that can really set us on a path to a low or zero carbon future.

For more information on how UWE Bristol tackle sustainability as an organisation find out more here

UWE Bristol Academic Spotlight: Professor Chad Staddon

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Chad Staddon is Professor of Resource Economics and Policy at UWE Bristol. He is an internationally-recognised expert in the socio-economic dimensions of water and especially water services.

His more than 100 scientific publications present research on the water consumer experience, demand management policies, attitudes to the water environment, water security, resilience in on and off grid water systems and household water insecurity in low resource communities around the world.

He has also researched and published extensively on issues related to the social science and economics of forestry and the forest industry. He is currently Global Director of the International Water Security Network and Associate Head of Department for Research and Scholarship.

In the recent past he has been co-lead investigator on the EC-funded project “Sustainable Water Action Network” (SWAN), and Water Research Fellow at the University of North Carolina, USA.  Along the way he has also led externally-funded research projects in Canada, the USA, Latin America, the UK, Western and Eastern Europe and Africa.

The Household Water InSecurity Experiences (HWISE) Scale: development and validation of a household water insecurity measure for low-income and middle-income countries. Source: ResearchGate

Dr. Staddon serves as an executive committee member for the Household Water Insecurity Experiences (HWISE) – Research Coordination Network (RCN). The Household Water Insecurity Experiences (HWISE) Scale is a short survey instrument that has the potential to transform our understanding of household water insecurity and especially progress towards Sustainable Develoment Goal 6 “Clean Water and Sanitation for All”.  It has already been validated for use around the world and is being used by a variety of organisations including OxfamWater Witness InternationalUNESCO-IHP, UNICEF and WaterHarvest for research, planning and policy effectiveness review. The tool is designed to be easy to use and interpret. It has already been applied in more than three dozen countries around the world.

Read more about Professor Staddon’s Research into household water insecurity and the Covid-19 pandemic

For further information about Professor Staddon’s click here

UWE Bristol’s Launch Space Incubator cohort takes off!

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The University of the West of England‘s 2021 Launch Space incubator cohort gathered for their induction last week at Future Space – Bristol. The day was led by Mark Corderoy from UWE Bristol and Aimee Skinner from Oxford Innovation.

Launch Space is for aspiring entrepreneurs and early stage businesses and is home to high-tech, innovative start-ups with a strong focus on research and development. The residents receive free business support, incubation, and acceleration services.

The group started off the day with a welcome from Tracey John, Director of Research, Business and Innovation, before hearing first hand from Arthur Keeling of indus four about their journey from UWE Bristol, to Launch Space, and into their current office at Future Space.

Next up were talks from key members of UWE Bristol’s University Enterprise Zone, including Shaun Jordan from RIF Bristol, and David Attwood from the Health Tech Hub, as well as the chance to speak with Andy Johnson from the Centre for Print Research about the fascinating work going on in their new location at Frenchay campus. After lunch, the group were thrown in at the deep end, delivering 90 second pitches to each other!

There were some seriously exciting #ideas, #innovations, and #entrepreneurs in the room, and we’re looking forward to seeing how they progress over the coming months.

‘As founder of VisitMôr, I am really excited to be on the UWE Launch Space business accelerator. The expertly led programme offers access to unparalleled specialist, technical and business support. It’s perfect to nurture the development of our new interpretation and visitor experience products  — these will be designed to help the museum, heritage, and conservation sectors to tell their own stories. We are also thrilled to be sharing our Launch Space journey with a talented cohort of fellow business pioneers; it will be great to share ideas amongst peers.’

Beth Môrafon, Founder/Director VisitMôr Ltd and Launch Space Resident.

Beth Môrafon, founder and director of VisitMôr, a public realm and visitor experience consultancy

“Launch Space has been an excellent asset for myself and my business so far. The support from the mentors has been invaluable and the opportunity to learn from other entrepreneurs and share experiences with them has been amazing.”

Guy Thurlow, Co-Founder and Client Director, TargetStudent and Launch Space Resident.
Guy Thurlow, Co-Founder and Client Director Target Student, offering digital advertising platforms for business brands in student accommodation.

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