Welcome to our new lecturers, Dr Scott Jones and Dr Cody Porter!

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We’re delighted to welcome Drs Jones and Porter to UWE and to PSRG – both have joined our Applied Cognition and Neuroscience theme.

Dr Scott Jones

Having received a First-class BSc (Hons) in Psychology from the University of the West of England, I then completed my PhD at Cardiff University. My PhD explored the potential applications of learning theory, and other engineering frameworks, to improve human identification of previous unfamiliar faces. 

Following the completion of my PhD, I held postdoctoral positions within the Brain and Cognition group at Anglia Ruskin University and within the Visual Experience Laboratory at the University of Birmingham. During these roles, I have been trained to use a variety of techniques including; eye tracking, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and EEG. My position at Birmingham was funded by the International Banknote Designers Association. This role involved collaborating with the central banks (e.g., the Bank of England, US Federal Reserve) and other stakeholders to design perception studies. The main focus of these studies was to investigate how individuals navigate and use the security features on banknotes.  

More recently, I have held the positions of Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer at Bath Spa University teaching and leading on a range of modules including: Introduction to Cognitive and Comparative Neuroscience and Advanced Biological and Cognitive Psychology. 

Broadly, my research interests focus on visual perception/attention and how our interpretation of the world can be influenced by prior experience, what we are viewing, and current internal state. I am interested in the basic mechanisms and associated brain areas that underpin learning through simple exposure (i.e., perceptual learning). In addition to applying this knowledge to investigate how we learn to identify previously unfamiliar faces and other frequently encountered objects.

Dr Cody Porter

Broadly, my research interests focus is on two strands of investigation (i) information elicitation and lie-detection, and (ii) mental health and offending behaviour.

After gaining a BSc (Hons) in Psychology from Bangor University I became interested in the forensic aspects of Psychology. I then completed an MSc Forensic Psychology from the University of Portsmouth. During this time, I started working in the NHS with offenders who had complex mental health disorders. I worked primarily with adult males but spent considerable time on the female ward. I then transferred to Bluebird House – the highest level of security in the UK for adolescents. I worked here for a year and trained in DBT for frontline staff.

My PhD research focused on ethical methods for encouraging suspects and eyewitness to say more during investigative interviewing. Providing more information creates greater deception cues. From this I developed a new interviewing protocol called the Asymmetric Information Management (AIM) technique.

My academic career started in the Psychology department in Portsmouth part time while working in the NHS. I then left the NHS to work full time in the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies where I supported the development of embedding well-being within the curriculum. I have taught on various psychology and criminology modules and have led a range of undergraduate modules such as Understanding Criminology, Essential Skills for Criminologists, and an optional practice-based Forensic Psychology and Mental Health module. I have also been module coordinator of the Masters dissertation module.

Most recently, I held the post of Principal Lecture at the University of Portsmouth, where I was the Programme Area Leader managing all distance learning Masters courses. Some examples include MSc Criminal Psychology, MSc Victimology, MSc Crime Science, MSc Counter Fraud and Counter Corruption, MSc International Criminal Justice.

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