Online Event: Down with Privacy, Long live Privacy

Posted on

Join us on Wednesday 14th October – 18:00 – 19:30

REGISTER HERE

This online webinar is hosted by Data Research, Access & Governance Network (DRAG*N) with presentations from Felix Ritchie (UWE Bristol) who will present on the newly formed DRAG*N Research Group and Darian Meacham (Maastricht University, Netherlands) who will present ‘Down with Privacy, Long Live Privacy’.

Privacy remains a central concern in deployment of data-sharing technologies. These concerns have been addressed in various ways, from glib “nothing to fear if nothing to hide” attitudes, to serious undertakings toward the development of privacy preserving technologies in federated learning environments (for example). Privacy is often understood in terms of a trade-off that citizens make in exchange for convenience or other forms of utility. In this presentation, I will look at the meaning of privacy in relation to informational asymmetry and governance. I argue that by examining this key concern through the lens of these related concepts, we can get a better grasp of what’s at stake in caring for privacy. 

More about the speaker:

Darian Meacham is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Maastricht University in the Netherlands and Principle Investigator for Ethics and Responsible Innovation at the Brightlands Institute for Smart Society (BISS). His research focuses on techno-political change: how technological developments transform our political world and the ideas that we use to describe it. He is editor of the Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology. 

All are welcome to this FREE Webinar, please click the link below to register your interest!

REGISTER HERE


Bringing Together Data to provide insights into Earnings & Employment

Posted on

The Wage and Employment Dynamics (WED) project aims to bring together data to provide insights into the dynamics of earnings and employment. The aim is to do this by integrating data across individuals across years, jobs, income sources and employers. This is a large project, with significant potential to improve our understanding of wage and employment issues from labour market entry, through job mobility and career progression to retirement decisions.

A team of researchers from UWE, University of London (CUL), UCL, and the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) will create a wage and employment spine to do just this. We will train users on the spine and generate research findings of direct interest to policy makers. 

This will entail analysis of:

  • Employment: focusing on the drivers of hourly wages, part- and full-time employment, self-employment, underemployment, and retirement decisions
  • Households: focusing on the structure of households and household resources and the way they affect participation in the labour market, including child care, retirement decisions, and the impact of Universal Credit (UC)
  • Employer perspectives: focusing on how workers achieve wage growth both within and across firms, and how employers react to changing labour market conditions, such as shifts in skills, demand, technology and minimum wages.

At the heart of the project is the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) and New Earnings Survey (NES). These survey datasets derive from a 1% sample of all employees in employment and will be developed to provide a truly longitudinal research resource. An ASHE/NES dataset which has longitudinal integrity across workers and jobs, with consistent referencing across data sets and time, will constitute a valuable research asset in its own right.

In addition, we aim to undertake six major linkage projects, in which we will create robust, documented linkages between the employee records contained in ASHE and data on:

  • enterprises and establishments – contained in the Interdepartmental Business Register, (IDBR);
  • personal and household characteristics – contained in the 2011 Census;
  • educational attainment – contained in HESA (Higher Education Student data);
  • benefit history – contained in DWP benefit records;
  • pay records – contained in HMRC PAYE data;
  • self-employment income – contained in HMRC Self Assessment (SA) records.

Through these various linking projects, we aim to create a core data set which allows integrated analysis of all forms of income across working lives, with the capacity to address a wide range of future analytical requirements. The end goal of the project is to turn this fully-linked dataset into a sustainable ‘wage and employment spine’ (WES), so that researchers no longer need to create new linkages each time. The linked data will be used for research purposes within the project itself, but the spine will form an ongoing resource for researchers. The intention is for the WES to form the basis for linked-data projects beyond 2022, both for academics and government agencies.

To find out more visit the WED website or sign up to their newsletter.

Online Event: Rules vs. Principles-based Regulation: What can we learn from different professions?

Posted on

Bristol Centre for Economics and Finance is hosting an online event on 28th May 2020: Rules vs. Principles-based Regulation: What can we learn from different professions?

There is an active debate in many disciplines about the most appropriate approach to regulation and enforcement. The workshop intends to bring together participants from different disciplines to provide an overview of the predominant approaches, along with the respective debates, experiences, and challenges. Common experiences and core issues can be identified.

The workshop aims to spark debate about regulation and whether we, across disciplines, could respond differently to the challenges we face and find novel ways to more efficient regulation.

Obtaining insight into other disciplines’ experiences shall enable us to rethink the predominant approaches. By learning from each other we can ask: Can we do better, both in our own disciplines and the common regulatory landscape? Might there be a better way?

The event is of interest to both public and private sector participants: Policy-makers, government enforcement agencies, academics, and industry professionals in the area of, and affected by, regulation, in various disciplines.

Sign up for this free event here

Workshop programme

13:00 – 13:05 Welcome Professor Felix Ritchie
  Cluster 1 Presentations: Data regulation in the public and private sector
13:05 – 13:15 Data in the public/private sector Design of incentive systems/evidence base Professor Felix Ritchie/Elizabeth Green
13:15 – 13:25 Data in the public sector Organisational trust Andrew Engeli – Office for National Statistics
13:25 – 13:35 Data in the private sector (I) Data Protection & Privacy Martin Hickley – Director Martin Hickley Data Solutions Limited
13:35 – 13:45 Data in the private sector (II) Data Analytics & Privacy Luk Arbuckle – Chief Methodologist Privacy Analytics
13:45 – 14:15 Cluster 1 Discussion
14:15 – 14:25 Break
  Cluster 2 Presentations: Financial markets and accounting
14:25 – 14:35 Rules vs principles in financial markets Financial Regulation & Compliance Expert witness Paul Keenan – Visiting Practitioner Professor in Financial Regulation in the Business and Law Faculty of the University of the West of England (UWE)
14:35 – 14:45 Rules vs principles in accounting (I) Practical accounting & Regulator Perspective Bryan Foss – Digital Non-Executive Director, Risk & Audit Chair, Visiting Professor and Board Readiness Coach
14:45 – 14:55 Rules vs principles in accounting (II) Auditing & Corporate Governance Ismail Adelopo/Florian Meier
14:55 – 15:25 Cluster 2 Discussion
15:25 – 15:35 Break
  Cluster 3 Presentations: Legal perspective and non-financial regulation
15:35 – 15:45 Legal perspective Financial crime Nicholas Ryder – Professor in Financial Crime
15:45 – 15:55 Non-financial regulation Modern slavery and other required reporting Jaya Chakrabarti – CEO Semantrica Ltd (tiscreport)
15:55 – 16:25 Cluster 3 Discussion
16:25 – 16:55 Summary and Closing remarks Nicholas Ryder Professor in Financial Crime

Business Models for Sustainability – A Workshop Collaboration

Posted on

The Future Economy Network (FEN) is a Bristol-based organisation born out of a need for sustainable business and better future thinking in response to the climate emergency. And in one of the most creative and environmentally conscious cities in the UK, what better place to meet the growing demand? All over the South West, FEN are seeing more and more active individuals and engaged businesses joining the network to learn about sustainability, meet like-minded others, and increase their sustainable business strength.

In response to the clear need for sustainable business growth, FEN are teaming up with UWE to create an engaging workshop titled “Business Models for Sustainability: The Barriers & Solutions”. There has been a significant growth in purpose before profit; businesses are increasingly seeing their customers demand social responsibility as an integrated part of the offer, not an afterthought or addition. With fantastic initiatives like B-Corp or Science Based Targets, businesses recognise that profit is no longer king, but the future of their growth (and survival) relies on the triple bottom line.

On 28th January, FEN and UWE will co-host a three-hour interactive workshop to better understand your business model. The session will start with two informative, introductory talks and then lead into personalised break out workshops.

What To Expect:

– Tools to develop business models for better understanding;

– Sustainable development and business models;

– Current and future business models.

One of the keynote speakers includes Peter Bradley, a leader in sustainable development at UWE. He is the principal investigator of the ‘Understanding and assessing business models for sustainability’ project, which researches the environmental and economic viability of business models that are intended for sustainable development. Alongside Peter, Ruth Smith from Sustainable Results Lab will be speaking on how Purpose beyond profit is the biggest movement in business right now. Ruth founded the Sustainable Results Lab to bring world class digital marketing to the environmental sector. Both speakers are members of FEN’s sustainability network.

The event will also include the usual elements of FEN’s weekly sustainable events programme that many have come to know and love, such as valuable networking, a friendly and motivational team, exciting 60 second pitches, and professional event delivery.

Grab your ticket here or pop into FEN’s new sustainability hub, Future Leap, to find out more about the diverse range of services available to those wishing to grow on their sustainability journey.

Update from Annie Tubadji, Senior Lecturer in Economics

Posted on

Senior Lecturer in Economics, Annie Tubadji is currently a Specially Appointed Lecturer at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan.

As part of her visiting scholar activities, Annie will deliver an undergraduate and postgraduate course on the “Economics of Happiness” at Center for Regional Economic and Business Networks (REBN) Summer School Institute.

As part of my Visiting Scholar activities, I will deliver here two courses (undergraduate and graduate ones) on economics of happiness at their Center for Regional Economic and Business Networks (REBN) Summer School Institute.

As part of her visit, Annie will also be delivering two specially invited lectures.

More on the Summer School Institute can be found here

Pro-environmental employee and consumer behaviour conference 2019

Posted on

The Bristol Centre for Economics and Finance’s first conference on Pro-environmental employee and consumer behaviour was held on the 29th of April 2019.

The day was a major success with around 80 registered participants and 14 presenters with many attending organisations and academics.   The event was highly energised, with many thought provoking questions for speakers and an atmosphere full of interest. 

Bristol Green Capital introduced the day,  the afternoon session was opened by the Future Economy Group and the closing of the conference was led by Dr Peter Bradley. We would like to thank again everyone who participated.  The event will run again next year.  The slides from the day, for those who are further interested in the conference and would like to find out more, can be found here.

Autonomy launch new policy report on a shorter working week

Posted on

BCEF member Dr Danielle Guizzo Archela is an associate researcher of Autonomy, an independent, progressive think tank which aims to address the uncertainty of work in the modern era.

Autonomy is comprised from a multidisciplinary array of researchers and experts in political economy and critical theory. On Friday 1st February 2019 Autonomy launched a new policy report on a shorter working week. “The shorter working week: a radical and pragmatic proposal” outlines the case for a shorter working week and shows that there is no positive correlation between productivity and the amount of hours worked per day. The report has received praise from a number of politicians and academics.

“This is a vital contribution to the growing debate around free time and reducing the working week. With millions saying they would like to work shorter hours, and millions of others without a job or wanting more hours, it’s essential that we consider how we address the problems in the labour market as well as preparing for the future challenges of automation.” John McDonnell, Labour Shadow Chancellor

Our conventional working week and the idea of a compromising work-life balance in the UK has been debated in the media for some time. Last year in New Zealand a landmark trial of a four-day working week concluded it an unmitigated success and the discussion on how a four-day work week could be implemented long-term was opened up.

The Autonomy report has already been making headlines, and the idea of working “part-time” being standard, rather than just an option for those who can afford it, has been very popular. Below are just a few of the recent articles on the report.

https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/economy/2019/02/how-idea-four-day-week-went-mainstream
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/01/bring-on-the-four-day-working-week-for-teachers
https://metro.co.uk/2019/02/01/boss-needs-know-productive-shorter-working-week-8423713/
https://www.redpepper.org.uk/less-work-more-play-a-solution-to-britains-economic-woes/

Autonomy have also produced a short YouTube video to accompany the report launch.

The Shorter Working Week launch video

Please see the Autonomy website to read more and to download the full report.

UWE Bristol Economics student briefs for the Bristol Festival of Economics

Posted on

The Festival of Economics 2018 will make Bristol a hub for debating and answering some of the key economic questions of our time.

The seventh running of the festival is programmed by Diane Coyle (University of Cambridge and Enlightenment Economics) and will take place at We The Curious. Economists and other key experts from around the world will be on hand to add their expertise to the programme.

The festival will feature keynote speakers and talks on unelected power (led by Paul Tucker), the rise and fall of higher education (chaired by Andy Westwood from the University of Manchester), growth in the Brexit era (Rain Newton-Smith), central banks in the past, present and future (Andy Haldane) and also sessions for schools.

The Festival of Economics 2018 is part of the Bristol Festival of Ideas. UWE Bristol have been actively involved with the Festival of Ideas throughout the year. In the run up to this week’s Festival of Economics events, UWE Bristol economics students have been working on briefs for the official events.

Thusday 8 November, 20:00-21:30

Does Economics Care About the Future?

With Chair Mirabelle Muûls (Imperial College/London School of Economics), Aditi Sahni (Vivid Economics), Alex Teytelboym (University of Oxford), Kees Vendrik (Triodos Bank), Dimitri Zenghelis (London School of Economics)

Brief written by the students of MSc Global Political Economy. 

This brief discusses whether economics, as an academic discipline and a profession, cares about the future. The essential question is whether the assumptions and methods of mainstream economics are fit for purpose.

Friday 9 November, 18:30-19:30

Andy Haldane: Central Banks, Past, Present and Future

The chief economist at the Bank of England in conversation with Festival of Economics director Diane Coyle.

Two briefs were written for this event:

Jamie Fallon, Shail Patel, Kieran Green,  and Reece Robertson (BA Economics) discuss the key issues as the trade-off between democratic accountability and effectiveness of monetary policy, geopolitical issues and growing pressure on banks to aid in the fight against climate change.

Jainni Patel & Luisana Toner (BA Economics) ask what were central banks thinking before the crisis? Was Quantitative Easing the best way for central banks to target inflation? And will machine learning save central banks from failing models?

 

Saturday 10 November, 16:00-17:30

Forecasts: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

With Chair Tom Clark, Jonathan Athow (ONS), Roger Farmer (University of Warwick), Rebecca Harding (Coriolis Technologies), Vicky Pryce, Andrew Sentance (PwC)

Brief written by Scott Angell, Iman Gaspard and Dominik Palejczuk (BA/BSc Economics) discusses whether economists should make predictions and forecasts. Economic forecasting is misunderstood by the public for a variety of reasons, including how those predictions are presented to the public. This brief weighs up probabilistic forecasting and the OBR’s productivity forecasts.

 

 

Pro-environmental employee and consumer behaviour conference with Dr Peter Bradley

Posted on

Current world population is just over seven billion and expected to reach nine billion before 2050. Increasing affluence in the developing and transition countries where population is growing most is now resulting in a wave of “new consumers”. This is important as in the developed world the main drivers for the level and growth of environmental pressures are said to be final consumption and affluence. Technology on its own will not adequately ensure that society stays within environmental limits. Therefore there is a need for serious consideration and research into consumer, employee and entrepreneur behaviours.

In this vain, the Bristol Centre for Economics and Finance (BCEF) is hosting a one day inter-disciplinary conference, organised by Dr Peter Bradley, leader of BCEF’s Sustainability Research Cluster and an expert in sustainability research. Peter’s research explores environmental and energy challenges and governance using empirical evidence based research as well as conceptual and theory based research. The “Pro-environmental employee and consumer behaviour conference” is taking place on 29 April 2019 and registration to attend is now open. Keynote speakers include Jes Rutter from JRP solutions and Dr Mark Everard (Associate Professor of Ecosystem Services, UWE Bristol). For more information and online registration, please see our event page.

 

Call for papers

We invite abstracts from PhD students, researchers and practitioners across the social and natural sciences to present on topics related to ‘pro-environmental consumer and employee behaviour’. Please send a 500 word abstract about your topic and contribution to bcef@uwe.ac.uk by Wednesday 19 December 2018 to be considered for presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

UWE Bristol Economics at the 9th IIPPE Annual Conference in Political Economy

Posted on

By Sara Stevano, Susan Newman and Lotta Takala-Greenish.

On 12-14th September 2018, the 9th IIPPE Annual Conference in Political Economy took place at Juraj Dobrila University of Pula, Croatia. Keeping up with recent years’ record, UWE Economics was very well represented at the conference! The conference was organised around the overarching theme of ‘The State of Capitalism and the State of Political Economy’ and over 300 scholars and activists from across the world discussed their political economy research, touching upon various facets of capitalist transformations and pushing the frontiers of political economy. The conference organisers reported that many participants thought that this was the best IIPPE conference so far!

Among the keynote speeches were a panel shared by Professor Lena Lavinas, Professor of Welfare Economics at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, and Professor Fiona Tregenna, University of Johannesburg South African Research Chair in Industrialisation stood out for their original content. Professor Lavinas highlighted the shifts in social programmes to increase financial inclusion. She commented on the contribution of social service programmes to GDP, 1.5% for developing and 2.7% of GDP for OECD countries, and connected these to the accumulation of debt among low-income households (see the excellent twitter feed by Ingrid H. Kvangraven). Professor Spread of income transfer programs across Global South have facilitated mass ‘financial inclusion’. The state and international financial institutions also play important role here. Result: Low-income households have accumulated huge amounts of debtSpread of income transfer programs across Global South have facilitated mass ‘financial inclusion’. The state and international financial institutions also play important role here. Result: Low-income households have accumulated huge amounts of debtTregenna focused on the need to unpack different forms of de-industrialisation and to explore the perspective that Marx’s analysis can offer to understanding industrialisation. In particular, her insights included an expanded focus on the heterogeneity within sectors and the inseparability of production and consumption (see also this blog post for further insights on the IIPPE2018 conference).

Spread of income transfer programs across Global South have facilitated mass ‘financial inclusion’. The state and international financial institutions also play important role here. Result: Low-income households have accumulated huge amounts of debtSpread of income transfer programs across Global South have facilitated mass ‘financial inclusion’. The state and international financial institutions also play important role here. Result: Low-income households have accumulated huge amounts of debtReflections on the state of capitalism are very relevant and timely in the context of shifting geographies of production, global relations of power and political discourse. Thus, it is all the more important to discuss how political economy research can help us understand and shape the economic, social and political transformations that mark our time. Critical political economy has an important role to play in transforming and revitalising economics, making it an inclusive and relevant area of study.

The three UWE Economics researchers who were in attendance this year intervened in panels on neoliberalism, the political economy of work, social reproduction and commodity studies. Dr Lotta Takala-Greenish presented her research on Exploring formal/informal work structures in South African waste collection (slides available here) in a panel that was described by the audience as one of the most interesting of the conference. This panel shared with Professor Stephanie Allais of the University of Witwatersrand, put forward important questions about the role of training and learning (both on and off the job) and the connections between education and labour markets. It also provided a forum to discuss and develop future collaborations with the South African Research Chair for Skills Development at the Centre for Researching Education and Labour. Dr Susan Newman presented her joint paper with Sam Ashman on New Patterns in Capital Flight from South Africa and discussed the preliminary findings of her joint paper with Dr Sara Stevano on The neoliberal restructuring of UK Overseas Development Assistance (slides available here), both papers were very appreciated by the audience who thought them revealing and timely. Sara Stevano presented her paper on Women’s work in Mozambique: Gender, social differentiation and social reproduction (slides available here) in a great all-women panel on social reproduction and the political economy of work.

Across several sessions, there was much discussion of the future of pluralist economics and education where UWE economics was highlighted as a leading institution. UWE Economics is now considered as an established centre for critical political economy, with possibly the largest concentration of critical political economists in a UK university. UWE’s recent recruitment of pluralist economists has been noted widely and was reflected in questions about future recruitment plans. Participation of UWE Economics in IIPPE continues to reaffirm the presence of our group in current political economy debates and generates opportunities for collaboration with colleagues in the UK and beyond. UWE Economics academics are involved with IIPPE in various capacities. Susan Newman oversees the content published on the IIPPE website and coordinates the working group on commodities studies; Sara Stevano coordinates the social reproduction working group with Hannah Bargawi (SOAS); Lotta Takala-Greenish set up and previously coordinated the working group on Minerals Energy Complex and Comparative Industrialisation.

One of the key aims of IIPPE is to provide a platform for early career researchers to interact with more established and senior scholars in political economy. The conference provided an opportunity benchmark and share information about postgraduate training in political economy. The UWE MSc in Global Political Economy was mentioned as one of only a handful degrees providing an interdisciplinary political economy approach housed within an economics department. The first intake of UWE’s MSc Global Political Economy students will be submitting their dissertations end of September and are being encouraged to submit their research to present at the next IIPPE conference in July 2019. We are also welcoming our new 2018-2019 MSc students who will no doubt contribute to the active research environment that we have here at UWE Bristol.