The Inclusive University

Time to Talk Day

Posted by Anna Houghton | 0 Comments
21Feb2017

Contributed by Sue Ollis, Student Support Adviser.

On Thursday 2nd February, once again the Mental Wellbeing Peer Support Staff Network marked national Time to Talk Day here at UWE.  As you can see, we offered free apples, free hugs and free conversation. 



Volunteers covered the stall from 11:00 until 14:00, during which time many hugs and positive conversations were exchanged with both students and staff.  Some staff also took the opportunity to join the Peer Support Staff Network.  You too can do so by e-mailing your interest to mentalwellbeing@uwe.ac.uk

This Time to Change national day is an opportunity to break the silence of mental health, to encourage people to speak about their mental ill health as they would physical ill health.  Working to raise awareness, reduce stigma and also reduce mental health discrimination, as UWE pledged to do following the signing of the Time to Change pledge in February 2013.  Since becoming a Time to Change Champion both in the workplace and beyond, I regularly speak out about my own experience during my own struggles with mental ill health during my fulltime working over the past 38 years.  On the morning of Time to Talk day, I was invited into Radio Bristol to highlight the need to talk.  You can listen to the show here (external link) between 2:02 and 02:15 hours in. (Available until 4th March).

On the day, there was also a positive message from the Prime Minister which you can see here (external link).

Since the signing of the pledge in 2013 and the subsequent organisational healthcheck, UWE have continued to address recommended actions including the launch of the Reasonable Adjustments Policy.  Further information can be found here.  Also, following a successful pilot scheme, we now have a Support Service for Disabled Staff.  This invaluable service can provide advice and support on a referral basis on disability-related matters, including – Reasonable adjustments, Access to Work and Mental Health.

The Director of Time to Change, Sue Baker (OBE) will be coming to UWE on Monday 3rd April and will be giving a lunchtime talk for interested staff and students.  More information will follow nearer the time, please check the events page for details.

Although much has been achieved, there is always room for improvement and much more to be done, to quote the PM, ‘not just in our hospitals, but in our classrooms, at work and in our communities’.

Protection VS Inclusion

Posted by Anna Houghton | 0 Comments
31Jan2017
Contributed by Sarah J. Davies, Social Work Placements Co-ordinator

Last month I found myself caught on the horns of a dilemma. I had been invited to a presentation about ‘Girl Talk/Women Talk’ in St Pauls, Bristol, both projects aimed at informing & empowering girls & women ages 11-19. Diversity and inclusion were the order of the day.

I arrived early evening and sat on the back row, excited to be acting in my new role as charity trustee. I set about tucking into my party bag of goodies and as instructed, did a spot of pre-presentation mingling.
‘you know, your face looks familiar’, said the first young professional I spoke to whose specialism was equalities and fair treatment. ‘I think I know you from UWE’, he said decisively. Sadly, my alternative identity had been blown.

The facts became clear. He had recognised me as the Social Work Placements Co-ordinator, having been a student some years before. This meant he had witnessed one of my unavoidably dull induction talks about the process of how undergraduate students would be matched to their long-term placements in Social Work offices or out in the community. 

 “At UWE,” he asked, “did you ever think about the appropriateness of placements in terms of a person’s racial background and were these considerations part of the placement matching process?”  We discussed the hypothetical situation of a car-less student, sent to a white working-class suburb for their placement and receiving racist abuse at a bus-stop. Would UWE send another student to the same placement again?

My new acquaintance made the hypothetical situation harder. What if this was the only available placement for a BME student, it matched their learning needs and there was no alternative? Conversationally, this was a tight corner, but somehow that corner seemed even tighter because the question was being asked by a black male and I, the white middle-class co-ordinator, so wanted to get it right. I fumbled my way through the answer:

‘Then that would be difficult and you’d have to balance this against your responsibilities under Duty of Care, but at the end of the day if you deprive the student of that placement then you are not giving them the same chance as any other student to pass the course. So in that situation, I’d have to talk to them about it.’

‘I’m glad you said that,’ he beamed.

“When I was in London, I was matched with a placement in Dagenham,” he said. He had gone on to do a further course in the field of Social Care.

“And I practically begged them not to send me there”, he said, “It had such a racist reputation”.

‘So what happened’? I asked.

“It was the best team I could ever have had. So I’m really glad they didn’t send me anywhere else.”

I had escaped the tight corner, but this got me thinking about the fear of losing face when it comes to inclusivity questions. We may have the best of intentions. But how do we know if we have made the right decision for a person when, by their own admission, they are capable of missing an opportunity for themselves?

Perhaps a commitment to honestly sharing experiences and ideas without fear of being reprimanded for ‘getting it wrong’ is more important than right answers. Because when it comes to inclusion, how else can we learn together?  

A Personal Experience - The Disabling Effects of Trauma

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 1 comment
22Dec2016

 

 

 

What happened to me

Earlier this year, I felt a sudden change within my physical and mental functioning. It started with night terrors and insomnia, but quickly turned into extreme depression, very high levels of anxiety in seemingly normal situations, regular panic attacks, unwelcome flashbacks, periods of disassociation, hearing and seeing things that did not exist, emotional numbness, demotivation, loss of self-confidence and self-esteem, heightened fear, body tremors, body pains, feverish sweating, loss of appetite and nausea.

I felt I could control or contain it until it started affecting my ability to speak and write. I could no longer access language the same way and this caused me to forget simple words. Sometimes, it brought on a stammering problem, and there were times where I would open my mouth and I could not get one word out.

My academic and professional life felt strenuous and tiring. I could no longer remember routes that I had walked a hundred times before and I started to lose balance in my body easily therefore socialising became more and more difficult. My personal life was painfully affected and I lost a lot of confidence very quickly. I isolated myself from my family, lost a lot of friends and lost the relationship I was in. The loss in every area of my life and inability to function felt like being trapped within my own body.

Seeking help and getting diagnosed with PTSD

It took me some time to accept that I needed help but once I did, I approached my GP at the UWE Health Centre, UWE Wellbeing, the NHS and various charitable organisations. After several assessments, I was diagnosed with severe Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

PTSD is a condition that sets in after a traumatic event where the event could not be processed properly at the time of occurrence. The memories are not stored in the brain in the same way and then start to re-surface later as though being played back in flashbacks with heightened reactions, triggered by the smallest of sensory reminders. This causes the physical and mental capabilities to feel overthrown.

For months, I had not understood what was causing these troubling symptoms that I could not control or contain, which felt even more disorientating - therefore finally having the PTSD diagnosis felt comforting. It helped me to understand that there was nothing wrong with me, I simply had a condition that was affecting my abilities.

Following the diagnosis, I did many new things to help me adjust and cope better:

    • I read available information to understand more about PTSD;
    • I was given medication specifically for PTSD;
    • I approached therapy that was targeted at PTSD including counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR);
    • I joined a specialist group to meet others who struggled with similar issues;
    • I discussed my diagnosis and circumstances with my Head of Department at UWE, my line manager, supervisors and colleagues that I worked very closely with;
    • I lived a crisis house in Bristol for a month to dedicate time for my recovery;
    • I mapped out my triggers and reactions to pinpoint what I find difficult to cope with;
    • I changed my lifestyle to be more accommodating and manageable;
    • I was kinder and less critical of myself;
    • I made time to do small replenishing things I had denied myself earlier in the year because I felt undeserving – I went for leisurely walks, listened to music, joined a choir, wrote in a journal, read books, cooked, went out for meals, travelled,got a kitten (whom I named Detective Bubbles) and even dyed my hair in colours that I liked; and
    • I spoke openly to my friends and family instead of putting on a pretence.

         

Almost a year has passed now since my diagnosis. Even with all the positive steps I have taken, it is an ongoing battle with symptoms that still surface and re-surface. Yet I am very grateful I reached out for help and receive the support I need.

Language as a barrier to healing

In terms of language, there were many labels and negative phrases people said to me: "you're weak," "move on from this," "you always act like a victim," "it's like you're 98%," "overreacting," "the past is the past," "you only think about yourself," "abusive," and "behaving like an abuser."

PTSD is a difficult condition to describe. I would personally describe it as living in a different world; one filled with fragments of a past traumatic event that flood your system, seize your senses and cease you from existing in the current world. The emotional and physical pains that come with it are terrifying mainly because you cannot stop or control them. The powerlessness, guilt and shame are heavy burdens to bear. It is difficult enough having the condition and made more difficult by negative connotations people attach to it.

Language is a two-edged sword. It can be used effectively to communicate messages and it can be used to entrap people. Nobody should have their personal circumstances dismissed or minimised, ignored or shamed. I consider Post Traumatic Stress a disabling condition for myself yet I describe myself as strong, as a survivor, and as 100%.

I hope this will give encouragement to be kinder to those around you because regardless of their appearance or behaviour, they may be going through difficulties that are both visible and invisible to the eye. I also hope that this blog post can help others come forward and seek the help they might need.

by Dharshana Navendren, Graduate Tutor, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, FET

Black History Month: BME Professional Careers Networking Event

Posted by Vicky Swinerd | 1 comment
21Nov2016


Contributed by Dr Zainab Khan

FBL celebrated Black History Month 2016 with a fantastic professional networking evening for BME students on 17th November.  Despite the stormy weather outside, over 50 Law and Business BME professionals and entrepreneurs from across Bristol joined us in order to share their personal career stories and advise our students.

Organisations in attendance included Elite Solicitors Ltd, Gregg Latchams, Albion Chambers, Bristol Pound CIC, GE Oil & Gas as well as the Black Police Association.

The evening included talks from finance experts and motivational coaches as well as successful UWE Bristol Alumni.

The event, the first of its kind at UWE Bristol, was a huge success and the inspirational speakers energised over 100 students in attendance, championing them to pursue their careers with even more enthusiasm and drive.  

The event was organised by Dr Zainab Khan (FBL) who would like to give advanced notice of Bristol Law School’s Annual Address: 9th February 2017 6pm Tunde Okewale MBE, the founder of the charity Urban Lawyers and recipient of numerous diversity awards, will be delivering his speech entitled 'No one Rises to Low Expectations.'  Registration for this event will be available online soon.

You can find more photos from the Networking Event on flickr.

UWE support for the Zero Tolerance campaign

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 0 Comments
07Jul2016
This article is taken from the Zero Tolerance campaign website and was originally published in April 2016 prior to the Bristol mayoral election:

The University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) have been involved in Bristol Zero Tolerance from the beginning and are championing the issue of addressing gender-based violence in Bristol with the University of Bristol and others.

We spoke to Professor Jane Harrington, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, to find out what has been implemented and what they are planning for the future:

 Professor Harrington, the Bristol Zero Tolerance initiative was needed because of the attitudes that she saw in students regarding gender-based violence: "I have been shocked by attitudes of students across the sector and was concerned that we had a specific policy to deal with this issue at UWE Bristol… In particular I have an interest in seeing that female students and staff have a safe working environment and that there are policies in place to ensure this. We obviously have a focus on students because this is a large issue, particularly around alcohol-related sexual violence and harassment. But it also translates to staff and it is important that staff also have a safe environment. Their home life can impact on the workplace, there is also the relationship of staff to students which needs to be appropriate, and it is also student to student. So we want to work on all of these aspects."

Professor Harrington is the Senior Lead for Gender at UWE and a member of the Bristol Women’s Commission and it was through this role that she was involved in setting up Bristol Zero Tolerance. "We felt it was the most pressing problem in the city and that we shouldn’t ignore it but should take a stance and not just sign the pledge but take actions, and this was an impetus for us to take action at UWE Bristol… I was the Chair of the Transport Sub-Group on the Women’s Commission and the biggest issue with transport is safety, likewise with housing, safety is a huge issue. So it impacts on so many areas. When we look at the percentage of sexual violence and domestic violence in society, it just has to be one of our main priorities, safety has to be a priority, because if we confront that and use it as a baseline then we can tackle the other issues of inequality against women and others."

‘Safety has to be a priority, because if we confront that and use it as a baseline then we can tackle the other issues of inequality against women and others.’ – Professor Harrington

For UWE Bristol, being involved in Bristol Zero Tolerance was important, as gender-based violence was an increasing concern and it was a priority to ensure the right response for students. For Professor Harrington it also "means that we can push in the direction that we were already going more quickly. It sends out a clear public message to students and staff about our values and the actions that we will take if they are not carried out."

UWE Bristol have also joined proactively with the University of Bristol and both student unions as well as with other agencies, such as the Police and Bristol Zero Tolerance, to create the Forum Against Sexual Violence and Harassment, which is a great example of joint working to create change on this issue. The Staff unions are also supportive and they are hoping to work with them further on this issue.

Externally, through the Intervention Initiative, they hope to help other universities and further education colleges implement this preventative work to tackle the problems of gender-based violence before they occur. As Professor Harrington notes, "if we can stop sexual violence before it happens, it is better than dealing with the consequences."

"If we can stop sexual violence before it happens, it is better than dealing with the consequences." – Professor Harrington



For Professor Harrington, a Zero Tolerance City would mean "that all aspects of sexual violence and harassment are tackled appropriately and people are empowered to take appropriate action and are confident that this action will be supported by the relevant bodies in the city, such as the Police, the universities and other services like The Bridge… I also want women to feel confident that if gender-based violence occurs or they are in fear of it occurring, that there is a place that they can seek help and be confident of this… My vision is that the percentage of domestic violence and sexual violence is diminished dramatically from where it is now and that this is not seen as a daily occurrence – that it rarely happens and is dealt with when it does… I want Bristol to feel a safer city to be a woman in."

She also has a message for the city leaders in Bristol: "I hope that whoever the elected mayor is after May 2016 that they commit to supporting this initiative and I hope that they see gender-based violence as unacceptable and want to address it, as well as recognising that this doesn’t happen without commitment
and funding!
"

We can’t disagree with that!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Lawrence Trust and UWE Bristol offer new bursary for young wildlife filmmaker

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 2 Comments
19Apr2016

Interview with Patrick Aryee on YouTube

The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust has partnered with the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) to offer a unique bursary for a young person wanting to study towards a prestigious MA in Wildlife Filmmaking.

The UWE Bristol / BBC Wildlife Filmmaking Master course is a practical, one year MA, featuring masterclasses from industry leaders, practitioners and experts in the field and craft of wildlife filmmaking.

This unique scholarship will not only provide world class teaching and practical experience to the student, but the successful applicant will also receive additional support in the form of bespoke mentoring throughout the course, and after graduation, from production staff at the BBC and Plimsoll Productions; an independent production company based in Bristol.

UWE Bristol's MA in Wildlife Filmmaking is now in its fourth year and has an employment rate of 90 - 100%, at any one time, for its graduates.

The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust has, historically, offered bursaries for young people studying towards a degree in architecture. More recently, bursaries have been offered to students studying law and journalism. With the announcement of this new scholarship the Trust continues to ensure that talented young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are able to access a variety of careers.

Sonia Watson, CEO at the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust says, "This is an exciting new venture for the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust. We have been working towards improving access to the media industry for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, but we have never ventured into the world of wildlife filmmaking. The work of the Trust is aimed at giving young people the opportunity to succeed in whatever field they choose, so we were delighted when we were approached by UWE Bristol and the BBC's Natural History Unit to develop a new scholarship aimed at increasing diversity in this field."

Alex Gilkison, Pro-vice Chancellor and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education, says, "UWE Bristol appreciates this opportunity to work in collaboration with the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust and the BBC to provide tangible opportunities for people from diverse backgrounds to enter the television industry at a professional level."

The Stephen Lawrence Trust & UWE Bristol Wildlife Filmmaking partnership bursary is open for applications. For further information and how to apply, please visit the course page.

 

 

 

 

We need to double number of young engineering students

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 0 Comments
18Apr2016

Catherine Hobbs, Head of Engineering, Design and Mathematics at UWE Bristol, reflecting on the latest report from Engineering UK.

Engineering is important to the nation, and we need more engineers. This message is certainly getting across loud and clear, from Government, from employers and from the professional bodies.

But what is the effect on the South West regional economy and where should effort be concentrated to address the need for more engineers? The latest Engineering UK report, launched on 10 February 2016, contains a wealth of data on the contribution of engineering to the economy and on the needs of employers.

For the first time, the data is broken down by region so we can see exactly how the South West is affected. The report tells us that over 27 per cent of the UK’s GDP comes from engineering and that this contribution is growing. In the South West alone almost 55,000 engineering-related enterprises were registered last year – up nearly 5 per cent on the previous year.
The annual turnover of engineering industry in 2014 in the South West was almost £78 billion, a growth of 11 per cent on 2013. However we are facing some severe skill shortages that will stifle further growth unless addressed now. It takes at least three years to produce a graduate engineer, and longer if you take on board that we need to start with children as young as 11 if we are to motivate them to consider an engineering career.

The evidence is that the 11-14 age group is critical and the Engineering UK report calls for employers to provide more high quality work experience and support for schools in the region to inspire this age group. More than 16,000 engineers will be required in the South West by 2022 which will mean doubling the number of young people doing engineering degrees and apprenticeships (including degree apprenticeships) over the next six years.

This is a possibility. At UWE Bristol we have doubled the number of engineering graduates over the past four years with very strong graduate employment outcomes (82 per cent of whom are in graduate employment at 6 months after graduation, and virtually 100 per cent of them employed at 3.5 years).

We have done this through stimulating demand with exciting outreach such as our involvement with Bloodhound SSC, and collaborative work with employers to develop and contribute to programmes that match their needs. The first degree apprentices from our innovative programme with Airbus, delivered jointly by UWE and City of Bristol College, rolled off the production line in November 2015 and will be followed by many more from a range of engineering employers.

Of course another aspect highlighted in the Engineering UK Report and acknowledged by Government, industry and education is that if we want to grow the number of graduates and apprentices we need to ensure that the whole population is represented. The under-representation of girls in engineering is not a new issue, but organisations like Tomorrow’s Engineers, who put on the Big Bang and Big Bang Near You shows, are starting to make a real difference to the perceptions of girls and their important influencers – parents and teachers – about engineering as an exciting and rewarding career for all.

This opinion piece appeared in the Bristol Post on 13 April 2016.

 

 

Princess Campbell paediatric suite opens at Glenside

Posted by Vicky Swinerd | 0 Comments
20Jan2016


The new Children's Focused Nursing Simulation Suite at Glenside was officially opened by Kath Evans, Experience of Care Lead – Maternity, Newborn, Children and Young People for NHS England.

The Suite, which includes a simulated children's ward and a sensory room, ensures student nurses develop skills and get the chance to practise them in a safe environment, improving their confidence and ability when they are on clinical placement.

The new facility is being dedicated to Princess Campbell MBE who was Bristol's first black ward sister, and who worked and studied at Glenside. Princess Campbell campaigned tirelessly for disadvantaged communities and sought to represent and give a voice to vulnerable people.

Transition Support Service for UWE Students

Posted by Vicky Swinerd | 0 Comments
10Sep2015

Contributed by Annabel Lee, Funds Administrator

The Money Advice and Funds Service (MAFS) is providing a new package of support in 2015/16 for students that have spent time in care homes or foster care. The Transition Support Service will help these students adjust to student life through pre-entry advice, online forums and the UWE/Care Leavers Bursary, for those eligible. We have also initiated a bespoke Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) scheme in which current care leavers mentor these new students in academic skills. Furthermore, students will be offered Financial Health Checks and receive ongoing support from a dedicated Student Support Adviser.

If you come into contact with an applicant who discloses time spent in care, please contact mafs@uwe.ac.uk FAO Annabel Lee (named contact for the Transition Support Service). We can then ensure the student is receiving all appropriate support.

Ron Ritchie: his thoughts on leaving UWE

Posted by Vicky Swinerd | 0 Comments
09Sep2015

Contributed by Ron Ritchie, Senior Diversity Champion

A retirement event for UWE's senior diversity champion, Prof Ron Ritchie, was held on 26 August in the Community Hub.
 
Ron was invited to reflect on his 40 year career in education in the greater Bristol area as a secondary school teacher, primary teacher and leader, local authority advisory teacher and HE teacher and leader.
 
He explained that he had very mixed feeling about leaving UWE having tried so hard to get here - first in the late 80s - before, several applications later,  he finally arrived here in 2001. He said that he had wanted to work here for a simple reason - it seemed like an institution that shared many of the values he held as important. It turned out to be a move that never disappointed him - he said he had always been immensely proud of the difference UWE makes to its students, its staff, local communities and the  local economy, culture and society. It had, he stated, been a genuine privilege to work here with many highly talented and committed individuals.
 
He emphasised the importance to him of values - what we hold as important as human beings - and noted that there's a big difference between espousing values and living them out. He said he had always tried to do the latter, not always successfully!
 
He explained his commitment to social justice and moral purpose was a result of experiencing the transforming power of education on his own life, being the first in his family to go to university. He had left school and started an apprenticeship in the aircraft industry which led to him studying aeronautics and astronautics at Southampton University. Whilst there he found life in student politics and the SU more stimulating and rewarding than his academic work. He spent a lot of time on campaigns such as those related to improving the opportunities for local youth and challenging negative attitudes towards mental health.
 
At this point, Ron reflected on choices we all have to become a 'prisoner, passenger or participant' in society - he had determined to become a participant and an activist!
 
He decided to complete his degree and train as a teacher. His experiences on a PGCE at Sussex University, especially in disadvantaged areas like the Moulscombe Estate, reinforced his commitment to fighting injustice and promoting equality. As a young teacher in a challenging Bristol comprehensive, his love of teaching developed and his activism led to him becoming the school's NUT rep.
 
He explained that his growing understanding and commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion was strengthened through living in Bristol and valuing the diversity of its population whilst feeling aggrieved about the inequality he saw. He also referred to his personal experience as a father and how this had informed his understanding of equality issues and increased his commitment to improve things, this included having a daughter who suffered from a serious mental health condition and another who is gay and now a university teacher.
 
Returning to other values that are important to him, Ron shared his belief in the importance of lifelong and life wide learning - saying he was always happy, even as a professor, to call himself first a foremost a learner. Indeed, he noted, his role as UWE's diversity champion had been a rich learning journey. He said how pleased he was to be supporting Bristol's ambition to be a Learning City as a consultant post his UWE retirement.
 
Ron stressed how much he had enjoyed teaching and believed that you should always strive for improvement given your responsibilities to learners, young or old. He reminded us that 'you don't have to be ill to get better'!
 
He talked about how he had always valued research and scholarship - his own PhD had been through action research; evidence-based and research-informed practice. He had written a number of education books, all including case studies of practice in real settings. Through his teaching and as a teacher educator, he had developed his understanding of the importance to professionals of reflection and reflexivity - being self critical and honest with yourself and recognising how who you are changes what happens around you and how others behave.
 
Later in his career, he had come to appreciate that successful leadership has to be authentic, distributed and person-centred. He stressed that to him 'leadership' was a more important concept than 'leaders' - he believes everyone in an organisation has the potential and should be given opportunities to contribute to leadership capacity.
 
Ron emphasised his belief in the benefits of collaboration and partnership based on various experiences in his career, for example in an advisory teacher team, in the Education Department (as part of the then S Block 'family' of academic and professional support staff) and more recently in the context of the Cabot Learning Federation.
 
He returned to leadership and organisations and said we should, perhaps, recognise more often the importance of people over processes. He said his aim had always been to empower others through reward and positive feedback. In that context, he thanked colleagues who had written in support of his National Diversity Champion nomination last year and said how moving and motivating he had found that public feedback.
 
Ron talked about the importance of significant others in our lives, both professional and personal and thanked those in the room and those unable to be here who had made unique and highly valued contributions to his time at UWE.
 
He concluded by reflecting on UWE's recent E&D successes and ongoing issues that remain work in progress …
 
The successes he celebrated included:
• Our ongoing commitments to activities related to widening participation and partnerships with schools in disadvantaged areas;
• The central and secure place of EDI in the UWE strategy, the successful Single Equality Scheme and senior staff commitment;
• The range and impact of staff and student networks;
• Stonewall Workplace index success;
• Athena SWAN success;
• The developing Disability Service for staff;
• Two Ticks accreditation;
• Time to Change commitment;
• Race Equality Charter Mark application;
• The outstanding contribution of HR and the E&D Unit.
 
Ongoing challenges for UWE that Ron recognised included:
 
• Further improving the diversity of staff;
• Maintaining inclusivity as a strategic goal, which includes promoting its benefits;
• Continue to probe the 'lived experience of staff' to ensure it is positive for all;
• Celebrate successes and promote role models;
• Find smart ways of measuring the impact of EDI work against the UWE Strategic Plan;
• Continue to build leadership capacity for the agenda;
• Foster more joint working (for example with unions and networks) and partnership with other organisations;
• Join things up to ensure efficacy, efficiency and maximising benefits;
• Develop efficient and constructive approaches to equality analysis;
• Ensure EDI doesn't suffer in the context of further inevitable change and uncertainty in the HE sector.
 
Ron finished by thanking colleagues for the support and friendship he had been given. He wished all well in continuing to make UWE the special place that it is and furthering the cause of equality, diversity and inclusivity.