The Inclusive University

Stephen Lawrence Trust and UWE Bristol offer new bursary for young wildlife filmmaker

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 2 Comments
19Apr2016

Interview with Patrick Aryee on YouTube

The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust has partnered with the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) to offer a unique bursary for a young person wanting to study towards a prestigious MA in Wildlife Filmmaking.

The UWE Bristol / BBC Wildlife Filmmaking Master course is a practical, one year MA, featuring masterclasses from industry leaders, practitioners and experts in the field and craft of wildlife filmmaking.

This unique scholarship will not only provide world class teaching and practical experience to the student, but the successful applicant will also receive additional support in the form of bespoke mentoring throughout the course, and after graduation, from production staff at the BBC and Plimsoll Productions; an independent production company based in Bristol.

UWE Bristol's MA in Wildlife Filmmaking is now in its fourth year and has an employment rate of 90 - 100%, at any one time, for its graduates.

The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust has, historically, offered bursaries for young people studying towards a degree in architecture. More recently, bursaries have been offered to students studying law and journalism. With the announcement of this new scholarship the Trust continues to ensure that talented young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are able to access a variety of careers.

Sonia Watson, CEO at the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust says, "This is an exciting new venture for the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust. We have been working towards improving access to the media industry for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, but we have never ventured into the world of wildlife filmmaking. The work of the Trust is aimed at giving young people the opportunity to succeed in whatever field they choose, so we were delighted when we were approached by UWE Bristol and the BBC's Natural History Unit to develop a new scholarship aimed at increasing diversity in this field."

Alex Gilkison, Pro-vice Chancellor and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education, says, "UWE Bristol appreciates this opportunity to work in collaboration with the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust and the BBC to provide tangible opportunities for people from diverse backgrounds to enter the television industry at a professional level."

The Stephen Lawrence Trust & UWE Bristol Wildlife Filmmaking partnership bursary is open for applications. For further information and how to apply, please visit the course page.

 

 

 

 

We need to double number of young engineering students

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 0 Comments
18Apr2016

Catherine Hobbs, Head of Engineering, Design and Mathematics at UWE Bristol, reflecting on the latest report from Engineering UK.

Engineering is important to the nation, and we need more engineers. This message is certainly getting across loud and clear, from Government, from employers and from the professional bodies.

But what is the effect on the South West regional economy and where should effort be concentrated to address the need for more engineers? The latest Engineering UK report, launched on 10 February 2016, contains a wealth of data on the contribution of engineering to the economy and on the needs of employers.

For the first time, the data is broken down by region so we can see exactly how the South West is affected. The report tells us that over 27 per cent of the UK’s GDP comes from engineering and that this contribution is growing. In the South West alone almost 55,000 engineering-related enterprises were registered last year – up nearly 5 per cent on the previous year.
The annual turnover of engineering industry in 2014 in the South West was almost £78 billion, a growth of 11 per cent on 2013. However we are facing some severe skill shortages that will stifle further growth unless addressed now. It takes at least three years to produce a graduate engineer, and longer if you take on board that we need to start with children as young as 11 if we are to motivate them to consider an engineering career.

The evidence is that the 11-14 age group is critical and the Engineering UK report calls for employers to provide more high quality work experience and support for schools in the region to inspire this age group. More than 16,000 engineers will be required in the South West by 2022 which will mean doubling the number of young people doing engineering degrees and apprenticeships (including degree apprenticeships) over the next six years.

This is a possibility. At UWE Bristol we have doubled the number of engineering graduates over the past four years with very strong graduate employment outcomes (82 per cent of whom are in graduate employment at 6 months after graduation, and virtually 100 per cent of them employed at 3.5 years).

We have done this through stimulating demand with exciting outreach such as our involvement with Bloodhound SSC, and collaborative work with employers to develop and contribute to programmes that match their needs. The first degree apprentices from our innovative programme with Airbus, delivered jointly by UWE and City of Bristol College, rolled off the production line in November 2015 and will be followed by many more from a range of engineering employers.

Of course another aspect highlighted in the Engineering UK Report and acknowledged by Government, industry and education is that if we want to grow the number of graduates and apprentices we need to ensure that the whole population is represented. The under-representation of girls in engineering is not a new issue, but organisations like Tomorrow’s Engineers, who put on the Big Bang and Big Bang Near You shows, are starting to make a real difference to the perceptions of girls and their important influencers – parents and teachers – about engineering as an exciting and rewarding career for all.

This opinion piece appeared in the Bristol Post on 13 April 2016.

 

 

Gender Equality in STEM subjects

Posted by Valerie Russell Emmott | 0 Comments
14Apr2016
Please see this interesting article, forwarded to the E&D Unit by John Albarran, the departmental lead for Athena SWAN (gender equality charter) from Nursing and Midwifery, based at Glenside.

 

Adjacent Government – Feb 2016

Profile: Women’s careers in STEM – What does it take?

01/02/16

Elena Makarova, Professor at the Centre for Teacher Education and at the Department of Education at the University of Vienna, outlines the obstacles young women have to overcome if they aspire to a career in the STEM fields, and how teachers can support their gender atypical career choice.

Makarova and her colleagues in Switzerland have conducted extensive research on the gender-atypical career choices of young women in secondary schools. The study “Gender-atypical career choice of young women” was funded by the Swiss National Research Foundation and was a part of the Swiss National Research Program (NRP60) on Gender Equality.

Makarova says: “Young women who aspire to a STEM career have to overcome a variety of hurdles and conquer gender stereotypes on their way to becoming a professional in a male dominated career field”. She further explains, what makes it difficult for young women to pursue a gender atypical career in Switzerland.

Perception of science as a male domain

Secondary school students not only have a stereotypical perception of both genders and personality traits associated with women and men, but also a gender stereotypical image of science. In the perception of female students women are labelled as being soft, dreamy, lenient or frail, whereas mathematics and physics are seen as being hard, sober, strict or robust. Thus, young women are strongly challenged in relating the masculine image of science to the self. This image of science not only endangers young women’s identification with this academic domain but in the long term also negatively affects young women’s interest in science, their academic self-concept in the science subjects and lastly their decision to choose a career in science-related fields.

Gender stereotypes in the science textbooks

In our study we analysed the textbooks for mathematics, physics and chemistry in secondary schools with respect to the numerical representation of female and male characters in the text and illustrations as well as the context in which both gender appear. It was obvious that male protagonists and the everyday experience of male students vastly dominated the representation of gender in the science textbooks. Moreover, persons of female and male gender were presented in highly stereotyped roles and activities. It can be assumed that the textbooks are less likely to appeal to young women and to encourage them to pursue science. Thus, issues of gender mainstreaming should be given more consideration by textbook editors and authorities who approve these teaching materials.

Prejudice towards women in STEM careers

Young women apprentices learning a STEM profession are at risk of experiencing discrimination during their vocational education and training. In order to adjust to a male dominated career field and to combat prejudice in the work place, young women need to outperform their male co-workers and need to be resilient towards gender stereotypical beliefs and attributes in the work place, or to assimilate within the gender atypical career field. Thus, training companies which provide apprenticeship programs in STEM fields should be strongly challenged to combat sexism and gender discrimination in order to create an inclusive working environment for young women in gender-atypical careers.

Makarova highlights further, that teachers can support young women’s interests in science and their career choice in STEM.

Fostering students’ motivation in science classes

As shown in our study, students’ learning motivation in science classes can be increased through the connection of science to different everyday experiences of female and male students, through providing individual instructional support for students, by using gender-neutral language, by giving information about STEM professions and by encouraging and supporting female students’ interests in STEM careers. Thus, science teachers can increase female and male students’ willingness to choose a career in science related occupational fields through conducting gender inclusive science classes.

A need for professional role models

Role models and mentors are highly important in the process of professional orientation and especially for the gender-atypical career choices of young women. A young woman who has chosen a career in the STEM fields highlighted the impact of male or female professional role models on their gender-atypical career choice. Consequently, parents, siblings, teachers and peers – regardless of gender – can function as a role model or a mentor by inspiring, supporting, encouraging and accompanying young women who opt for a career in the STEM fields.

A way to go

Gender segregation in career fields typically chosen by women or men constitutes a serious obstacle to gender equality. In this endeavour instructional design of science classes which increase students’ learning motivation emerges as a promising means to gaining more women and men for STEM occupations. In this endeavour teachers play a crucial role in helping students to overcome gender stereotypical beliefs and make their life choices independently of their gender.

 

Prof. Dr. Makarova Elena

University of Vienna, Centre for Teacher Education/Department of Education

Tel: +43 664 60277 60030

elena.makarova@univie.ac.at