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Just showing posts from July 2012

Bio-Sensing Technology Series: Paramagnetic particle-based detection system 

Posted by Denise Hope | 5 comments
18Jul2012
Welcome to the second article in our Bio-Sensing Technology series, looking at a paramagnetic particle-based detection system. This technology is led by Professor Richard Luxton and Profesor Janice Kiely, directors of the Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology (IBST), and we ask them to tell us a bit more about their research.

So what is a paramagnetic particle-based detection system?
The paramagnetic particle-based detection system uses paramagnetic particles (PMPs) to detect biological interactions between two complementary binding partners such as antibodies and antigens (analytes) in an immunoassay.

This is a biosensor that can provide measurement of analyte concentration within a test sample in just few minutes. In this system, the test samples and PMP labels are added to a reaction vessel in the biosensor and are attracted to a reaction surface at the base of the vessel, using a magnet where specific binding takes place. Unlike other immunoassay systems no extra washing or processing procedures are required. The bound particles, and associated antigen are detected using a coil under the surface of the biosensor.

What are the benefits?
The use of paramagnetic particles as a label in an immunoassay has resulted in the development of a rapid and highly sensitive biosensing device. Substances in the part-per-trillion concentration range have been measured. The novel instrumentation is inexpensive and can be powered by standard, small batteries to be used as a handheld system for field testing.

What are the applications of the paramagnetic particle-based detection system?
This is a platform technology and has a wide range of applications in areas such as point of care diagnostics, environmental testing, bio-security and food quality.

Can you give us some examples of projects where the paramagnetic particle-based detection system has been used?
A number of projects have been funded to develop the technology for different applications to meet specific needs for companies. For example:

Diagnostic markers: Includes a range of projects to detect biomarkers of disease such as cardiac or cancer markers. There is also a project for the raid detection of bacteria such as clostridium difficile.

Environmental testing: Government funded projects, for explosive residue in the environment enable a highly sensitive and rapid assay to be developed. 

Food safety and quality: A number of projects in this sector have focused on the rapid detection of bacteria in food materials.

Lead researchers: Professor Richard Luxton and Profesor Janice Kiely

For more information about the paramagnetic particle-based detection system, please visit the Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology website.

Bristol Microbiology Forum 

Posted by Denise Hope | 1 comment
11Jul2012
Bristol Microbiology Forum

Around 60 delegates attended the Bristol Microbiology Forum from UWE, Bristol University and the University of Bath for an exciting and diverse selection of talks, highlighting some of the microbiology research currently being undertaken in each University.

The event was sponsored by the South West Biomedical iNet and UWE's Centre for Research in Biomedicine and provided both young and established researchers with a forum to present and discuss science.

Research highlights included batteries that are powered by bacteria fed with biological waste, deriving fungal medicines by understanding biochemical pathways, and public engagement in science (check out the online journal club for new students <http://microtwjc.wordpress.com>).

For further information contact Dr Victoria Davenport.